Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

In FreeBSD the firewalls (IPF, IPFW, and PF) sit between the Device Driver and the IP Stack. Routing is part of the IP Stack.


4

its because its specifying a single ip, you need to write it with the subnet: pass in from 111.111.0.0/16 man pf.conf should list a few methods of defining ranges and blocks. A side note, take care to ensure there are no drop quick kind of rules above your pass, and no rules below that could accidently match and block your packets.


3

pfsense is a firewall OS and is based on FreeBSD And PF and would offer you a fully web based GUI. for more information check out http://www.pfsense.org


1

Officially you can't mix them. Unofficially various incantations and sacrifices might lead to a working, though precarious, configuration. In any case it's simply not recommended. Also, why not just use one or the other? I assume you're wanting dummynet to do some per-endpoint bandwidth limiting, if not PF might be all you need. Similarly, IPFW can do ...


1

You have to quote the subnet mask addresses again (with single quotes) when defining: subnet1 = "'192.168.1.0/24'" subnet2 = "'10.0.0.0/8'" subnets = "{" $subnet1 $subnet2 "}" Sadly this doesn’t appear to be documented anywhere.


1

I too was facing this issue and it took quiet a bit of testing and tcpdump to figure it all out. To answer your first question, which one the rule 7/0(match) is: It is the "Generic_blocks_(IPv4)" rule automatically added by IceFloor to block and log all non-explicitly authorized traffic. You can confirm that rule's number by running pfctl -gsr as root. On ...


1

This is because you don't block outgoing traffic by default on your localnet. Try using something along those lines: block out from $localnet to any pass inet proto tcp from $localnet to port $client_out_tcp pass inet proto tcp from $localnet to port $client_out_udp



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible