New answers tagged

0

You need to remember that an ARP request is a broadcast, and it will go to every host on the broadcast domain. Both PCs, connected to a hub, are on the same broadcast domain. When PC1 has a gateway, and you try to send something (ping) off its network (to PC2), the ping will go to the gateway; PC1 will ARP to find the gateway address (not the PC2 address) ...


4

The first reply you get is from the device you are pinging from and is probably because of an ARP lookup going on which makes the first ping timeout.


2

The first icmp packet is fail because host sends ARP request. If the destination host MAC is already in ARP cahce the device is not send this request.


0

Since you are testing against a publicly-available web site, the aptly-named down for everyone or just me web service is very helpful. Just put the address of the site in question into their web form, and they will ping the address from a few locations. I've yet to run into a situation in which a server was up but they were not able to reach it, even in some ...


9

Now the problem is apparent. Your network interface has the wrong prefix set. It is set to /8 (or in the old netmask notation, 255.0.0.0), which tells your operating system that every address in the 104.0.0.0 through 104.255.255.255 inclusive is on the same LAN as your VPS. This obviously is not the case. Most of this range is subdivided into very small ...


0

Service ping is part of SoftLayer basic monitoring (stuff you get for free) It essentially pings the server with set interval and generates warnings if server is not responding to ping. For start turn on the Nimsoft monitoring for hardware resources. This will tell you what is happening with actual host. If you are ready to spend few dollars (I think its ...


0

Packets sent to localhost don't go over any hops so the ttl shown will be the starting value. Windows 10 C:\>ping -4 localhost Pinging Win10Main [127.0.0.1] with 32 bytes of data: Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128 .... OpenWrt 15.05 root@OpenWrt:~# ping localhost PING localhost (127.0.0.1): 56 data bytes 64 bytes from 127.0.0.1: ...


2

Your example is really confusing, but in the general case it's not reliably possible to determine the originating IP of someone initiating a DNS query. The reason for this is the existence of DNS recursion. If I happen to make a DNS query to my DNS server, it usually will take it upon itself (or delegate it itself) to get the data and send it back to me. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included