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14

POP3 is an older protocol. It was designed to transfer messages to a client for reading; that client would be some other computer. Once the message was transferred, it would (usually) be deleted on the server, although there is an option to keep a copy on the server at all times. IMAP is a newer protocol. It was designed to allow one or more clients to ...


13

I'm currently using the free hMailServer for SMTP, POP3, and IMAP. It has been pretty solid in the couple years that I've been using it. I've run it on Windows 2003 R2 and Windows 2008 Standard and Enterprise. I'm using SquirrelMail for webmail. This is PHP, but it wasn't that hard to setup. This is free as well. The best commercial experience that I had ...


10

Mail Server Options If you can install and configure svn a web server and dns, you should not find it difficult at all to install your own mail server. Since you're going to go with Gnu Linux/Debian Lenny, I'd suggest using Postfix and Dovecot as your Mail Server Software. Postfix can handle your mail sending/recieving (smtp, tls etc.) Dovecot can manage ...


7

Can clarify what you mean by "handed" to an IMAP server? Are you trying to consolidate messages stored in several POP email accounts into one IMAP account? Is this a one time deal or ongoing? One-time deal: Use a desktop client like Thunderbird. Add each pop3 account in turn (you can give each one their own "inbox"), as well as the imap account. Download ...


6

We use stunnel for Gmail's POP3S service, works like a charm. Here's a sample config: # stunnel.conf [pop3s] accept = LOCALPORT connect = SECURESERVER:PORT Then you point your CRM the LOCALPORT you define.


5

POP3 is not part of postfix. Postfix is an MTA. I suggest you use dovecot as the pop3 server. There are plenty of guides on the internet http://rimuhosting.com/support/settingupemail.jsp?mta=postfix http://wiki.dovecot.org/HowTo/PostfixAndDovecotSASL


5

If she hasn't purged the items in the "recover deleted items" folder, you can still get them back there. You can get to that by (in outlook 2003) right clicking the deleted items folder in her mailbox and selecting "Recover Deleted Items...". Although, I believe for this to work with Hard-Deleted items, you would have had to previously enabled Recover ...


5

I'd seriously push for fighting the political battle to allow IMAP access to the Exchange system. IMAP and POP can be enabled on a per-account basis. Since this is a workflow item with a defined business application, there's definitely a purpose... I'd be more suspicious of a the long-term viability of a workaround solution or anything that adds more ...


5

Sure, you can do this -- Log in to each mailbox and scan for your competitor's names in the mail contents. You would probably be best off writing a script to do this (you don't tell us what OS or mail software you're using, but there are some good POP3 Perl modules you could use on pretty much any platform. Honestly you want to do this on the server rather ...


5

As shown in your graphic, no protocol that exists "between" SMTP and POP3. SMTP is responsible for moving the message from the sending computer to the recipient's mail server. If there are multiple servers involved in moving the message from the sender's server to the recipient's server, each one moves the message via the SMTP protocol. These in-between ...


4

Email Server management is the mind killer. Unless you have a need for privacy/secrecy then running a mail server is a PITA. Email is such a 99.99% required uptime service these days that losing email for one or more of your important accounts is potentialy catastrophic. That said, it's always worth having a spare domain name to use while learning new ...


4

I would use fetchmail to download the mail to a server every few minutes then use dovecot to serve it up as POP3 or IMAP Both are relatively easy to configure.


4

Consider your need for: shared calendaring shared meeting room/resources shared contacts Active Directory integration If these features appeal to you, you may with to consider moving to an Exchange setup. You don't have to purchase/license Exchange and all the servers, however. There are a handful of good Exchange hosts out there that can really help ...


4

Server 2008 does not include any built in features for POP or IMAP, the only mail component you get is the SMTP server available for IIS. There are a number of mail servers available for server 2008, unfortunately there aren't many that are open source. Free hMailServer - as you already said it does not offer a web mail interface, but you could use ...


4

It's not a one-liner, but you could copy chunks like this (in csh): foreach file (`ls | head -n 1000`) mv $file /tmp/new/dir end I'm not 100% sure that pipe will work with the number of files you've got, but it's worth a shot. Also, you might be able to do 500 at a time with this command, just change that 1000 to 500.


4

If you use a Unix/Linux solution (like Postfix/Dovecot), you could just use fetchmail or something like that to get the mails from the old server and inject it into the local mail system on the new one. All you would need is a list of usernames/passwords for the POP accounts on the old server.


4

my guess is that when you moved the messages the UIDL on the messages have changed. In POP what the client has seen is stored on the client, and it is done by UIDL. So if they have changed, then all of the clients are going to see the messages as new, and there isn't that much that you can do about it. (Save figure out how to make all the UIDLs of the ...


4

Does the new server have a different name and IP address? If so, then the clients don't believe it is the same server as before, and therefore, the email it contains aren't the same ones it already fetched. It is entirely up to the client whether to delete old mail from the server once it has fetched it, or to leave it on the server. If it is configured ...


4

No you should add the mail server to your SPF record. For example: mydomain.com. IN TXT "v=spf1 mx a a:mail.mydomain.com ?all" If mail.mydomain.com was an MX record for the domain, it would be covered by mx.


4

This behaviour depends on the mail client, not the server itself. There should be an option in your mail client to put a copy of sent e-mails in the "Sent" folder.


3

Even if the answer is already excepted, I'd like to mention IMAP. I don't understand why people still use POP3 these days. I think nowadays most people work on more then one machine (e.g. at home and at work) or read their mails on a mobile device or via a webinterface. Keeping the mails on the server is a good idea when you want to access them from ...


3

If the machines are all on one network, you're much better off doing it from a network tap. Why? Users can't delete the software Machines you don't know about are covered User can't delete the logs Disk crashes (on the clients) can't destroy your logs Reinstalls can't destroy your logs User's can't get by it with boot CDs or what-have-you Etc. Using ...


3

Thunderbird stores its mail folders as mbox files (see the Thunderbird FAQ). If you locate the file for the spam folder, you can train from it using the --mbox switch: sa-learn --spam --mbox /path/to/spam_mbox


3

It will depend entirely on the users and what they're using the e-mail accounts for. Your average soccer mom will have different needs than someone who is e-mailing 20MB CAD drawings all day long. Also, are they POPing mail out and removing it from the server, or are they using IMAP or webmail where the mail will stay stored on the server forever? I can ...


3

Google Apps has a free version http://www.google.com/apps/intl/en/group/index.html. Just make one of the domains your main one that you use to set up the Google Apps account, then add all the other domains as domain aliases. Then create accounts for abuse and postmaster etc, log into their mail accounts, and set up mail forwarding to whatever email account ...


3

If you just want to get the email that is sent to those accounts, you don't necessarily have to resort to IMAP and POP. I'd investigate giving each of those accounts a .forward file, changing the MAILTO variables in your cron scripts, or even creating sendmail aliases before trying to read things like root's mail through POP or IMAP.


3

If all that's needed is to monitor mail for root, what I did was add an entry in /etc/aliases to forward all emails to another email address. Don't forget to run newaliases to rebuild the database for mail alises.


3

You have to actually follow the POP3 protocol: Commands ... consist of a case-insensitive keyword, possibly followed by one or more arguments. All commands are terminated by a CRLF pair. Keywords and arguments consist of printable ASCII characters. Keywords and arguments are each separated by a single SPACE character. Keywords are ...


3

Yes, multiple accounts can coexist well in Outlook. Even accounts of differing types, like Exchange, IMAP and POP3. By default, recent versions of Outlook will show each account under its own folder structure in the left pane of the main Window. A quick look on my Mac's Outlook 2011 shows that there's an option to allow a unified mailbox that groups items ...


3

I do this myself. I have my work-exchange, my personal Google Apps and iCloud all syncing to the same Outlook on my Outlook - Work laptop, it works without any problems. This is how my calendar looks: I think you can consolidate them into one view, rather then x separate panels.



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