Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Recent versions of xinetd can also listen on IPv6 and then forward the connection to an IPv4 address. A sample configuration which listens for IPv6 connections on port 3389 and forwards them to port 3389 of an internal IPv4 address: service rdp_port_forward { flags = IPv6 disable = no type = UNLISTED socket_type ...


1

As noted in the comments on your question, NAT64 is far from being ready, even 3 years later. You could, however, try 6tunnel, as suggested by puzzlement. Fortunately, it is present in the Debian and Ubuntu repositories, so you can install it very easily using sudo apt-get install 6tunnel. If you are using another system, you'll have to build it from ...


1

Mulaz did come up with the right keyword: http://wiki.mikrotik.com/wiki/Hairpin_NAT Nat settings conflicts with my port forwarding settings on my router so sometimes a local dns server on a linux server may be required. Your mileage may vary.


0

Iptables are wonderful, but if you keep everything in nginx, then it can do the job it was designed for. It's possible to do other advanced tricks with iptables like logging and packet marking, but if you don't have a reason to do it outside of nginx, you should go through nginx. That way if you move to a different system like (Ugly)windows server or ...


0

The Ubiquiti EdgeRouter devices are Linux-based and use a fork of the Vyatta router distribution (version 6.3). The Vyatta 6.3 documentation is pretty good and very in-depth. The Ubiquiti documentation isn't bad either, but it's not as in-depth as the Vyatta documentation. Assuming you're familiar with the networking concepts you're working with the ...


0

Simple setup like this: In sip.conf set bind=192.168.254.1 Add route to your voip provider via eth2 All other setup require checks of how your packets really go and what asterisk send in sip packets. Not think you can get answer on that in stackoverflow format.


0

It seems that you cannot do this on ASA. The feature to support this is called "Policy Based Routing". But according to the following link, Cisco support this feature only on routers, but not on ASA-Devices: https://supportforums.cisco.com/discussion/11215831/source-routingroute-maps-asa


-1

I am pretty sure you need only adjust the mynetworks key in your postfix config. Change it to use the catch all addresses instead of only the local host ones. So: mynetworks = 0.0.0.0/32 [::]/128


0

The problem was in my destination, different from cisco router. To check if your cisco router is making port forwarding you do: Router#sh ip nat trans | i 80 Then check if there is an entrance similar to this: tcp 186.67.181.203:80 192.168.1.20:80 85.72.43.64:51720 85.72.43.64:51720 If it's there, it's making the port forwarding.



Top 50 recent answers are included