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You have a routing problem. Consider this: your RPI (192.168.0.x) does know nothing about the existence of another LAN (192.168.1.x). How can you inform it that another LAN exists right next to it? Answer: by using a route, which is a very specific piece of information stating how a particular subnet/host can be reached. In your example, your LAN ...


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You have at least three possible solutions. Setting up policy based routing on your private PC. (hard to setup, more permanent, pretty) http://lartc.org/howto/lartc.rpdb.multiple-links.html Set up ssh port forwarding. (easy, junky solution) https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SSH/OpenSSH/PortForwarding Set up destination NAT (PAT) and source NAT @ VPS. ...


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The short answer is no. The long answer, your java app see just the xinetd server from localhost. This cannot be done by xinetd alone. Use a proxy server to get the full features of headers and etc. Apparently is the same problem: tomcat6 behind xinetd - real client ip


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This cannot be done using DNS directly. A domain name always resolves to a single IP address, the port isn't related to DNS records at all. However, you can set up a reverse proxy on your web server that is listening on port 443. You would set up virtual hosts server.machine.com and other.machine.com on the www.machine.com web server, which would then ...


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Although traffic can flow in both directions when NAT is in place, the important distinction is that without port forwarding, a server cannot "listen" for new connections on a specific port from hosts outside that network. Take the example of when one browses a web page. The important point here is that your browser is the client; it's reaching out to ...


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Connection tracking. If the device connects from inside the NAT to outside, then related packets from the outside system are permitted in. This can be done with both TCP and UDP in some cases.


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Run netstat -lpn and verify that the web server port you want to use is in deed running on 0.0.0.0 instead of localhost. If it's not then we need to edit the configs to listen on "*" and then restart the web server daemon. If you have a firewall on your machine, just for a few minutes here to troubleshoot, turn it completely off so that we can eliminate it ...


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Yes, windows does have a iptables equivalent, it is via the tool netsh and the portproxy interface. The command to do what you want would be netsh interface portproxy add v4tov4 listenport=8080 connectport=80 Note, that this will only do IPv4 connections, if you also want to forward IPv6 connections you would also need to do netsh interface portproxy ...



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