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Since you primarily seem to be focused on having an encrypted telnet session, my suggestion for a alternative would be to use a tool like stunnel. Stunnel is a TLS proxy that allows you to add TLS/SSL on top of simple tcp protocols (like telnet). You get all the benefits of encryption, and authentication provided by certificates. The challenge with ...


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I've been working on this same problem for a while now. The solution that seems to work for me (at least when I demoed it using VMs) wound up looking significantly different than what you have posted here. Real quick, here are my configurations: iptables -L: Chain INPUT (policy DROP) target prot opt source destination ACCEPT ...


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This turned out to be an issue with the device. It did not respond properly to outside connections when configured with a static ip.


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screen does a very good job of this. Ssh into the remote box and screen /dev/ttyWhatever baudrate


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Make sure your server is running. Double check by port testing the server via telnet. Execute the following on the server: > telnet 192.168.1.50 25565 And i can't ping using external ip Sounds like a firewall that blocks ICMP protocol which is used by ping. Make sure to disable the Windows built-in firewall as well. i can ping with internal ...


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for iptables redirect you can do like this : iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 80 -j REDIRECT --to-port 8080


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1) Obtain your public IP address by requesting a static one or using a site like https://www.whatismyip.com/ 2) Do a port forward from your modem/router to the internal IP of your raspberry pi on port 22 3) While not on your LAN, connect to your public IP address on port 22 and you should connect. Each modem/router is going to handle that forwarding ...


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I have managed to diagnose my own problem. The IPtables are fine. The problem was my understanding that I could not (as configured) test port forwarding of port 7022 on the external IP from the internal network. The issue is covered quite well in the canonical answer to "hairpin NAT" which explains how to route an internal client through the FORWARD ...


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Why to use NAT? In this scenario, you can directly router between the two LANs, without port forwarding at all. Anyway, if you really want to use NAT, port 5060 should be sufficient if your clients are standard SIP ones. If they are mixed/custom protocol clients (eg: Cisco H323 and/or SCTP/SCCP implementation) you will need to open additional port ranges. ...


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You need to allow destination port 22 on the input chain, it's only on the forward chain.


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Unfortunately I cannot comment because of low reputation, so please do not downvote if I'm not correct. I've googled around a d found this networking guide for "LXC", but it mostly seems to apply also to "LXD": http://www.flockport.com/lxc-networking-guide/ Within this article there is part "Deploy containers in cloud KVMs". Portforwarding is explained ...


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I think that you dont need redirect any. Can edit server.xml to create 2 connectors.... fe. <Connector port="8080" protocol="HTTP/1.1" connectionTimeout="20000" redirectPort="8443" URIEncoding="UTF-8" /> <Connector port="80" protocol="HTTP/1.1" connectionTimeout="20000" ...


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You have a routing problem. Consider this: your RPI (192.168.0.x) does know nothing about the existence of another LAN (192.168.1.x). How can you inform it that another LAN exists right next to it? Answer: by using a route, which is a very specific piece of information stating how a particular subnet/host can be reached. In your example, your LAN ...



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