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If nothing is listening on the server already, then I usually simply start a service on the port. Modern firewalls may use packet inspection though, so it's no guarantee that what you aim to have listening on the port is going to work. You can do this with nc like (for example for TCP on port 6667) nc -l 6667 Then try telnet or nc on the sending end. If ...


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finally - after some further trial and error - we uninstalled Symantec Protection Tools from the physical host, and after that all services were accessible again. (deactivation was not enough) thanks for your efforts.


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This is difficult (if not impossible) to do depending on your access to resources. If its a Unix based server I'd run tcpdump on the server (in such a way that it only listens to the traffic on the port you are interested in), and then try and connect to it via Telnet. Telnet will, of-course fail, but at least you should see the incoming server attempt ...


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What you are seeing from telnet is correct, you can't do what you want to do. To have an open port, you have to have something listening on the relevant IP:Port and nothing actively blocking it upstream (e.g a firewall).


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The NAT entry you added looks correct, now you need to allow that traffic through your INBOUND ACL. Since it is an extended ACL you can edit it directly: ip access-list extended INBOUND permit tcp any host 212.9.28.216 eq 110


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you don't have to use route-map. you have to mark your interfaces ip inside and ip outside accordingly, create a ip access-list for NAT and modify the ip nat statement.


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For CentOS 7: firewall-cmd --permanent --add-port=8080/tcp firewall-cmd --reload


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Basically, you don't need to forward any ports on openvpn, as openvpn works just fine behind a nat. If you need to establish a connectivity between the subnets, you need to configure routing information exchange in openvpn. Or, depending on your setup scheme, you're just using openvpn from the wrong machine - perhaps you just need to use it from this ...


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# record what tcp_max_orphans's current value #set the tcp_max_orphans to 0 temporarily echo 0 > /sys/proc/net/ipv4/tcp_max_orphans # watch /var/log/messages # it will split out "kernel: TCP: too many of orphaned sockets" # it won't take long for the connections to be killed # restore the value of tcp_max_orphans whatever it was before. echo ...


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It turns out on CentOS 7 in order to turn off the iptables service, you need the following: sudo systemctl stop firewalld I had just run the command to turn off iptables the old way, and didn't notice the error. Now I can test, and if it works, will put back the iptables rule in my final machine build. Thank You!


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Verify Cassandra is configured to listen on the correct IP address (via cassandra.yaml). By default it is probably only listening on 127.0.0.1.


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Are you running the program as root? If you are not running as root, you cannot bind any program to ports bellow 1024. They are considered privileged ports, and only root can use them. If you want to run as root, don't. Running as root can create problems if someone exploits your program and gets a shell, and discovers it's a root shell. Run as an ...


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Yes it is possible! However it depends on the WebSphere Version you are using. With WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment simply create a new JVM (aka "WebSphere Application Server") by navigation to "Servers > Server Types > WebSphere application servers > New ..." Each dedicated JVM has its own https ports (Servers > Server Types > WebSphere ...


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If you want something to run on port 80, it's usually better to use port forwarding to handle relaying port 80 to it's standard port. Port 80 is a "reserved port" as well as a "low port." Many programs will refuse to run on it unless they have proper permissions, which you likely don't want to give them. Instead, once you have Confluence working on ...


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Have you edited the listen ports in your server.xml? Check this out: Change listen port for Confluence


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On ubuntu 12.04 you had to add the IP there (httpd.conf is empty) to NameVirtualHost xx.xx.xx.xx:80 (if you have more than one domain on website) Listen xx.xx.xx.xx:80


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Don't remove the SMTP default configuration, just add the port you want Postfix to listen to perform the appropriate SMTPd action: smtp inet n - - - - smtpd 465 inet n - - - - smtpd #smtp inet n - - - 1 postscreen #smtpd pass - - - - ...


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This question is three years old but I feel it should be answered: they aren't open in the default installation; at least, not anymore. A port scan on a base installation of OpenBSD 5.5 only shows ssh: Port Scan has started… Port Scanning host: 192.168.1.29 Open TCP Port: 22 ssh Port Scan has completed… Enabling httpd and disabling pf ...


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Set up port_in_redirect off; in your server configuration.


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The problem was the windows firewall (Server 08). For some reason he was locking door 3128 by internal NIC. I created an inbound rule and resolved.


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Port based NAP isn't about TCP/IP ports. It's about physical switch ports. The things we plug the ethernet cables into. You need a switch which supports it. Port numbers do come into play when setting up noncompliance network policy - you define which IP addresses and which ports the computer is allowed to communicate on when it is not compliant and not ...



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