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1

RTSP is just another application layer protocol layered on top of TCP or UDP, like HTTP or FTP. As Wikipedia puts it The default transport layer port number is 554 for both TCP and UDP, the latter being rarely used for the control requests. If you open up TCP and UDP, you should be fine.


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This really depends on SSSD configuration, in particular auth_provider. auth_provider=ldap requires either port 389 (with TLS) or 636 (ldaps). auth_provider=krb5 requires port 88. ipa and AD providers require both actually, because even identity data is encrypted with GSSAPI, so you need port 88 to prime the ccache to do a GSSAPI LDAP bind, then port 389 to ...


8

You should use TCP ports 389 and/or 636. Port 636 is for LDAPS, which is LDAP over SSL. Encryption on port 389 is also possible using the STARTTLS mechanism, but in that case you should explicitly verify that encryption is being done. Microsoft's KB article says: Start TLS extended request LDAPS communication occurs over port TCP 636. LDAPS ...


3

As long as it LDAP auth only (and not AD/Kerberos etc.), 389 should be sufficient.


1

Run netstat -lpn and verify that the web server port you want to use is in deed running on 0.0.0.0 instead of localhost. If it's not then we need to edit the configs to listen on "*" and then restart the web server daemon. If you have a firewall on your machine, just for a few minutes here to troubleshoot, turn it completely off so that we can eliminate it ...


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In Windows 7 there is a ssh.exe Here is what worked for me: 1. create identity (on windows) c:\>ssh-keygen That created an identity file in the home directory. I changed the name of the public key to "id_rsa" 2. copy the file to the target linux system using the ssh Credits to http://serverfault.com/users/984/zoredache for his answer c:\>ssh ...


0

In addition to SNAT, a MASQUERADE should also do and will make it a little easier. MASQUERADE is SNAT except instead of specifying an IP address you are specifying an interface; this means that you won't need to add POSTROUTING rules if for example you add more port forwards. iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $out_interface -j MASQUERADE In theory there ...


2

As it seems that all machines are on the same subnet, the Windows computer will try to answer directly to the client without passing through the NAT box (layer 2). You should SNAT reply packets also, adding : iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s 10.10.10.7 -p tcp --sport 3389 -j SNAT --to 10.10.10.5


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Mac OSX is based on BSD so the netstat under Mac OSX will not be able to show you the pid/process name. As you already figured out, lsof is the right choice.


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Edit: The version of Netstat that is included with Mac OSX does not interpret the -p flag as it does in other distributions (protocol instead of program), so while Netstat likely did not work for the reasons outlined below, lsof was still the correct way to go for the answer. Netstat by default uses friendly names/definitions for ports (e.g., ssh instead of ...


0

Because you are NATing from G0/0 to G0/1 you cannot use an access-list to allow traffic. NAT acts as a firewall so you need to use a Port-Address Translation rule. For the single port, that would look like this: ip nat inside source static udp x.x.x.x 5060 interface g0/0 5060 The port range is a bit more tricky, as IOS doesn't usually deal with port ...


3

Yes, it's called a load balancer.


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Turned out that the corporate network which the client was sending out UDP packets on had it's ports blocked.


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Running netcat -zv publicIP 1-80 will show you only the open ports for TCP, not UDP. As testing for open UDP ports using netcat or nmap is tricky, i would recommend trying the following steps to confirm that your server is listening on specific UDP port and it can accept connections to that UDP port remotely. Stop the service listening on the specific port ...


0

I used following command .It gave output what I wanted. nmap -A IPAddressOfRemoteSystem -p portNumber ex : nmap -A 192.168.1.87 -p 8080 (or) we can check the local ports also before that first check what are the ports are open/listen mode by using following command. netstat -ntlp | grep LISTEN after that nmap -A localhost -p portNumber and close any ...


0

If using iptables as a firewall, you could try temporarily disabling it to rule out any firewall cause: /etc/init.d/iptables save /etc/init.d/iptables stop Then check if you can connect. If so, it's a firewall issue. Be sure to re-enable the firewall when you're done: /etc/init.d/iptables start Of course if this is a super high security server you ...


0

Is httpd listening on the port? netstat -apn | grep 6060 or netstat -apn | grep httpd If httpd is listening on the port, perhaps a firewall is blocking inbound connections on the port. If you're using a distribution with systemd/firewalld, you can use the following instructions to add a port to the zone in use: firewall-cmd --get-active-zones ...


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The problem was that I used the IP address when trying to connect, while the certificate was issued for a DNS name. Now it works.


1

I was trying to run server using node server.js. It didn't show up any error. Also, lsof -t -i:80 not listed any processes. The problem was I tried to bind as a non-privileged user. It got worked when I tried: sudo node server.js So simple, but, sometimes you may forgot it and you will start running behind other server processes when you have multiple ...


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Is it possible that the server actually supplied a value other than that recorded? Usually the IP and port provided in the response to PASV are local to the server. But since FTP is protocol which causes lots of trouble when used with NAT routes, firewalls etc sometimes the IP you see in the response is not the IP of the server: Some servers have the ...



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