Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

I'm not a C programmer either, but it doesn't take much to see in the code http://doxygen.postgresql.org/pg__archivecleanup_8c_source.html that return code 2 is used for many different failures. Search for exit(2). It looks like all of them print error messages to stderr.


2

At time of writing no, you can't. See: http://dba.stackexchange.com/q/61305/7788 http://dba.stackexchange.com/q/66372/7788 Please nag them, both on the forums: https://forums.aws.amazon.com/message.jspa?messageID=547192#547192 and via any AWS sales/support contacts you may have.


2

The permissions are correct as you want all of the data files and other associated stuff to be owned by the postgres user. I think the issue here is that the postgres daemon is not running as the postgres user. Make sure that as root, you are running: sudo -u postgres pg_ctl -D /Library/PostgreSQL/9.3/data start Adjust the necessary paths for pg_ctl and ...


2

Many perl modules will be available within the usual package hierarchy. For Ubuntu, I believe the package you want is called libdbd-pg-perl - so try installing that. For packages not included within the package hierarchy, you can use the perl module CPAN to install them. As root, run perl -MCPAN -eshell and follow the instructions to configure what ...


2

rsync will be much faster than FTP for synchronising files repeatedly - it simply checks the file size and timestamp on the receiver to find out whether it should overwrite the file, thereby minimising the amount of data transferred for each synchronisation. If there is a lot of files you may want to consider creating a tarball automatically (using for ...


1

Yes, you can do it the other way around. Just set it up like a normal synchronous cluster, but set synchronous_commit = off in postgresql.conf. Then: SET LOCAL synchronous_commit TO ON in transactions you want to commit synchronously. Keep in mind, though, that a synchronous commit will force prior commits to flush before it can commit. So if you do ...


1

If I had to guess, I'd say the server is running out of RAM and swapping heavily, so it's not servicing requests properly. It may also explain why the inserts are taking so long. Can you ssh into the server? Does top show significant swap use? There isn't really enough info in the question to really say, beyond pointing you in that direction.


1

My first guess would be that you've upgraded to a new PostgreSQL or installed a patched one by hand, and your new version isn't set to autostart. So the old version started up with the old data in it. Check to see if there's a newer datadir elsewhere. Failing that, as @yoonix suggests, perhaps you moved the datadir and mounted the new volume over the old ...


1

You haven't set the auth type to sspi in pg_hba.conf for the user/host/database combo you're using.


1

Replication between RDS and servers outside RDS is not currently supported by AWS. See: How can I set up an Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL database to act as a replica to a non-RDS PostgreSQL database? http://dba.stackexchange.com/q/61305/7788 http://dba.stackexchange.com/q/66372/7788 https://forums.aws.amazon.com/message.jspa?messageID=547192#547192


1

Your script works fine. I just executed it on clean debian wheezy and it worked fine. So the problem is not your script but that your SQL database is not running so you cannot make any query. psql: could not connect to server: No such file or directory Error about "no such file" is because you are sudoing in the root catalog to user which doesn't have ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible