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16

You need (fanfare) RFC 1918 - Address Allocation for Private Internets Your private (IPv4) network MUST use one of the ranges allocated by this RFC: 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix) 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix) 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix) Anything else is Just Plain Wrong. And ...


11

Some things that are missing from the answers and comments posted so far: Manuel is from Sylt Island, which is an island in northern Germany. The address range 194.77.30.50 - 150 is part of a block allocated to Interoute Deutschland GmbH (which is an LIR) by RIPE NCC (RIR). It's completely possible (and probable) that Interoute Deutschland GmbH assigned ...


11

Linode are who I am with. They have very good pricing, good performance (google search "slicehost vs linode" for example) and a very active support community in the forums and IRC if you need help. Highly recommended!


7

By my understanding, you didn't even need to purchase it. If the site is intranet, you could just set up a DNS server to point LAN computers from any domain to any server. On my LAN, I can point http://google.com to my file share.


7

Before classless networks were invented, it was decided to make three ranges of private addressing space. These were: Class A: 10/8 (the old ARPA reservation) Class B: 172.16/12 (one of the first available class Bs) Class C: 192.168/16 (one of the first available class Cs) There are: 1 Class A private prefixes (16.7 million addresses) 16 Class B ...


5

It appears they where selected by IANA simply because they where unused. The earliest mention I can find in an RFC is 1597. Also see rfc 1627. Both rfc have been obsoleted by rfc 1918


5

No. If you could feasibly recreate the private key from a CSR, the whole concept of asymmetric cryptography would be rendered moot.


5

You do not have to use RFC 1918 space if your site is using public IP space. Check with your provider and see if that range is correct for your site. If it is, I suspect someone has a subnet mask incorrectly set


4

I forwarded the question to the internet-history mailing list and Craig Partridge, chief scientist at BBN, said: 10.0.0.0 is easy. For folks who needed LARGE private networks the only large space available by the early 1990s was the old ARPANET network number (the ARPANET was net 10 and was decommissioned around 1991).


4

no. SSH/SFTP is not using SSL certificates, but SSH certificates or keys (unless you have specially crated SSH server and clients supporting this). But you can configure this way FTPs server for sharing your data. Or you can store the SSH fingerprints to SSHFP DNS records to avoid prompt on the side of users (also depends on the client software, if it ...


3

In general you can point ANY host entry in a DNS configuration to ANY IP address. Specific, you an do it unless your host blocks it (for example by checking it in an editor), but that is not a DNS intrinsic limitation (and one that is arguable - makes possibly sense "unless user overrides it" to avoid stupid mistakes by users with less knowledge.


3

Of course you can point any domain name to a private IP address. It will only be accessible from the inside.


3

I need some information as to whether its necessary to get a business server and a Microsoft exchange server and a web server or just some. Yes. You need Microsoft Exchange. It does everything you want. You can have multiple users connected to the same exchange inbox from their own personal computers, and they can all see which messages have been ...


3

Your question as it is asked currently is kind of like asking "is a door secure ?". There is no real answer to that. If it's unlocked, it's useless. If it's a crappy lock, it's 90% useless and so on. If the database server is in a VLAN on it's own, it's pretty much useless as it cannot communicate with anyone else. If it is in a routed VLAN then it's ...


2

127.0.0.0/8 is a lookback subnet and thus cannot be used as a network spread around multiple machines. Similar applies to 128.x.x.x and other subnets which afaik are predefined by IANA to fall into the a, b, or c class of subnets based on their prefixes. This is probably the cause why 10.x.x.x, 192.168.x.x, etc are so wide spread - because they fall into ...


2

Have a look at OVH, they offer the RPS service which is essentially a diskless system connected to a large SAN. They also offer VPS style services as well.


2

There are many, SolarVPS is very good for me.


2

I use vpsFarm for one of my personal images. I chose it for the un-metered bandwidth.


2

VPSNet (vps dot net) I use Slicehost, tough, but a colleague of mine uses VPSNet and likes it.


2

Webbynode - cheaper but not better than Slicehost.


2

1) No. A LAN is typically refers to the physical network in a premises. A private network is an abstraction that may coincide with the LAN, but may also include other physical networks. Or it may be a subset of a given physical network. 2) A public network? 3) It tends to refer to separate physical networks that are logically connected across the public ...


2

Use DNS. If you're concerned about public access to names that resolve to private addresses, you can either run an internal DNS server that's publicly inaccessible that forwards to a more general-purpose DNS server, or use a DNS server that will restrict access to parts you don't want people to see.


2

Use a proxy server installed on either server 1 or 3, configured to allow connections to the sites in sources.list from the private network servers. As a bonus, if you go with a caching proxy like squid or approx you'll use less bandwidth for downloading packages common to the servers. For regular web proxies like squid, you can either set the $http_proxy ...


2

Leave the IP stack on the instances alone. The default gateway it picks up from DHCP is correct, and routing to the NAT instance is done by the VPC infrastructure. The security group on your NAT instance needs to be configured to accept all traffic from 172.16.0.0/16 (you can set it more restrictive if needed, but you first need to get it working). You ...


1

As the instructions for the web framework told you, you make the DocumentRoot the public directory.


1

From: http://blog.ine.com/2008/07/14/private-vlans-revisited/ If you need to configure an SVI on a switch to communicate with private VLAN members, you should add an interface corresponding to Primary VLAN only. Obviously that’s because all secondary VLANs are “subordinates” of primary. After an SVI has been created, you have to map the required ...


1

What would happen [...] The world is not going to explode, if this is what you mean. You should have done some basic research beforehand - there even is a Wikipedia article explaining your exact scenario: The following table shows the traffic which can flow between all these ports. I-Port P-Port C1-Port C2-Port Uplink I-Port Deny ...


1

Mail traffic (SMTP) does not flow via webpages. If you want to be able to receive mail on the mail server then it needs to be reachable via the internet. Same for sending mail to the outside world. If you only use it for internal mails then by all means, put it safely on the private net.


1

Am I understanding that the Linux machines have two NICs-- one connected to the Internet and using a public IP address and another connected to the LAN with the ASA? Assuming that's the case, it sounds like you just need a static route on all your Linux machines to route traffic sourced from the VPN subnet back to the ASA rather than to the default gateway. ...



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