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0

Use pwdx , which should list the path to the executable


3

You can stop the process with ctrl-z. Then do whatever you want in the terminal. To continue the process use fg. Or from another terminal, use: kill -19 <pid> It sends SIGSTOP (signal number 19) to the process. This is not possible to catch for the process. To continue the process use: kill -18 <pid> This time it's SIGCONT that brings the ...


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I think you should be able to hit Ctrl+Z and it'll suspend the process. When you're ready to come back to it, just use fg command and your process will come back to life in the foreground. Or, you could issue a bg command and it'll resurrect your program in background (equivalent to /some/program &)


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I have faced the same issue earlier, netstat -a -n windows command gave me the list of open ports with process ID. From that i have picked up the port number which i wanted to close the connection and then i closed that connection using TCPView software. This worked for me.


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Yes, child processes inherit the access token of the parent process (from UAC Process and Interactions on TechNet): Each application that requires the administrator access token must prompt the administrator for consent. The one exception is the relationship that exists between parent and child processes. Child processes inherit the user access token ...


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Yes, it will execute with Administrator privileges. Simple test: You can test this by opening the app as an Administrator and opening notepad.exe from the app. Try saving a blank text file to C:\Windows. If it does not throw a permissions error, then you know the child process (Notepad) is running with elevated privileges.


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Yes, the child will be in admin mode. This is why running cmd.exe as admin allows you to start other programs in admin mode.


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You might run the process with a specific user and match the packets with the iptable's owner extension. Once matched, you can mark it and use it with another routing table, use POSTROUTING or whatever solution you might like. This post better explains packet matching with owner.


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My first question is: What the reason that the swap memory is increasing – because high level of RAM usage or something else? You dont have high level of ram usage. read this You can check by typing free -h or free -m and look at the line with -/+ buffers/cache: The reason for increasing swap usage is because you only have 2GB of ram and ...


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What the reason that the swap memory is increasing – because high level of RAM usage or something else? Yes, High level of RAM usage Second - is it possible to verify how much memory a process holds? Most of the methods are indicative to find out how much memory a process holds. There is no accurate way of measuring this as lot of factors add ...


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in the newer linux kernel you see in which kernel function your process is stuck cat /proc/<pid_numer>/stack


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Man page for ps has this info, "-" means the process is running. WCHAN name of the kernel function in which the process is sleeping, a "-" if the process is running, or a "*" if the process is multi-threaded and ps is not displaying threads.


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If a significant amount of swap is in use (more than just a few MB) then the system is indeed in a memory crunch - your example shows such case - the system typically becomes sluggish in such conditions. A small amount may be normal, typically indicating memory pages swapped out (during a memory crunch which happened sometimes in the past) which weren't ...


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If the in the *nux env, you can refer to the supervisor for help http://supervisord.org/. As as for the win system, try write the windows service.


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So you need a script or program that can: Search for running processes with a certain start command line Start a new process with a certain command line Manage a list of programs and their parameters to monitor periodically perform step one, (wait a little, then check again) run in the background Pretty much every programming/script language available ...


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To check what particular apache2 process is doing, use strace. # strace -p <pid> Look at systemcalls and make your way.



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