Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/23530820/php-connection-aborted-does-not-always-works/29401757#29401757 TCP requires that ALL sent packets be acknowledged by the client and therefore the server should detect this as a send timeout at the very least... set_time_limit(10);//to force the detection of a disconnected client session_write_close();//to make ...


0

I had luck identifying culprits with the Linux auditing subsystem. Linux audit files to see who made changes to a file linux - Monitoring system calls - Information Security Stack Exchange


3

Start by investigating the relations between parent/child processes using a command such as ps -AF --forest. The Parent Process ID (PPID) will either be the process that spawned the process in question, or 1 if it forked or became orphaned. The --forest switch to PS displays a graphical representation of this relationship. Deamons are usually started with ...


0

In this case, you can just type: fg, then hit ctrl-C. In case you want to directly kill your remaining process, under bash, you can easily issue a: kill %1 Which will kill the first process in background, as identified by jobs.


0

Ok the core problem has not really to do with docker. Its more on general linux-user-permissions. I have to set the right permissions for a specific user and then i could use this user inside the docker-container.


1

The most direct Solaris equivalent is /proc/<pid>/path/a.out For example: % ls -l /proc/$$/path/a.out lrwxrwxrwx 1 alanc staff 0 Mar 13 21:16 /proc/2892/path/a.out -> /usr/bin/tcsh*


3

Here's one way of doing it. In Solaris you would use the pargs -ae <pid> command for this. The line that says argv[0]: will tell you what executable is running. This is however not enough as you do not know the current directory of that process when it was started so if arg0 is not fully qualified then you don't have the full path to the running ...


1

I think your console window is trucating the output. Try ps -ef ww, as suggested here


0

This one-liner worked for me: /bin/bash -c '/usr/bin/killall -q process_name; exit 0'



Top 50 recent answers are included