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This is a bit of a hack-y answer and won't likely work for most people. It's also a huge security risk methinks, so don't do it unless you're sure you'll be safe and the inputs are sanitized and...well, you get the idea. Compile the little C program here into a binary called start (or whatever you want), then run your program as ./start your-program-here ...


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Probably not very efficient, but it seems to work: $all_Processes = gwmi win32_process -ComputerName . | select ProcessID,ParentProcessID,Description,@{l="Username";e={$_.getowner().user}} | where{$_.Username -like $env:username} $all_processIDs = $all_Processes.Processid #ARRAY1 $parent_processIDs = $all_Processes.ParentProcessId #ARRAY2 # create a new ...


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I found another thread at U&L: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/31824/how-to-attach-terminal-to-detached-process perhaps the answer does work for your problem.


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according to the man page, in the FILES section: /etc/atoprc Configuration file containing system-wide default values. So I guess you should look there. You also have a ~/.atoprc file with your personal preferences. Maybe interesting to note, the /etc/atoprc file is not automatically created. If you install atop from EPEL repo, it does not add the atoprc ...


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This command works on my system to kill vi processes with the state "S". Change S to S1 and the process name regex pattern to whatever to get what you need. ps ah -o pid,state,command | egrep "^.+\ S\ vi$" | cut -f1 -d' ' | xargs kill -KILL Crontab: 00 01 * * * ps ah -o pid,state,command | egrep "^.+\ S\ vi$" | cut -f1 -d' ' | xargs kill -KILL I ...



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