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22

What you're asking is "Can I run a single threaded application on a multi-core machine and take full advantage of all the cores?" The answer is : no A single threaded application can only run on one core and will never be able to use more resources than that single core can provide.


14

The command psrinfo -pv is the command you are looking for. It gives you the number of physical cpus plus the count of virtual processor per physical processor. For example on a V880 it looks like this: The physical processor has 1 virtual processor (0) UltraSPARC-III+ (portid 0 impl 0x15 ver 0x23 clock 900 MHz) The physical processor has 1 virtual ...


14

dmidecode or preferably cat /proc/cpuinfo dmidecode will give you a lot more info than just what processor, thou /proc/cpuinfo provides more info about the processor itself


13

Should be very little difference in performance between two dual core CPUs and a single quad core CPU, if you are using current Intel Xeons. However, you might expect to see slightly better performance from the quad-core CPU if it is a "true" Quad core design, ala the new AMD Opterons or the new Xeon W5xxx (aka the Core i7 / Nehalem) series. ...


13

From what I've seen, there are three things to be aware of for i-series processors vs Xeon series processors: Xeon processors can typically be used in multi-cpu motherboards; i-Series processors cannot (just like the sales guy told you). This is by far the largest difference between between the processors themselves. Certainly a good i7 processor has the ...


11

There's no danger (when using server-class hardware). I've run hundreds of HFT systems where we'd designate a CPU core to run a spinlock thread (to reduce interrupts) or have strategies pegged to specific CPU cores for the duration of the trading day. This is what the CPUs were designed for. I can say that I've never had a processor fail in this context. ...


9

the 1400 means that at which speed the processor is running RIGHT now. 3000 is the Max cpu speed.


8

ARM chips are RISC processors that were created by Acorn and the design is now owned by ARM Limited. They license the design out to manufactures to add on to their own chips to create “systems on a chip” that contain many feature on one chip, and with the ARM design are able to include the CPU as well. The ARM is very prevalent in low power embedded ...


8

Under Windows you might want to try CPU-Z. Under linux, you can try cat /proc/cpuinfo.


8

As i recall, most OEM heatsinks come with a thermal pad, and that should usually be sufficient. Some heatsinks come with thermal paste with a plastic covering which may need to be removed. IF there's already a thermal solution, DO NOT use that at the same time as your own thermal paste. I'd suggest using whatever the heatsink comes with first (its probably ...


8

Broadly speaking: You don't care. What you probably care about when designing a server is speed (GHz), parallelism (number of cores), and bus speed, combined with the total heat load (usually expressed in BTU/hr) the machine is going to put on your cooling system. How you prioritize these depends on your use case. If you care anyway: Wattage (more ...


7

The highest-clocked CPU I've ever seen installed in that model of server is the Intel X5470 (3.33GHz). The firmware or motherboard may not allow for the CPU that you're trying to use. Check the firmware release notes for more information. The X5482 (3.20GHz) is a 1600MHz front side bus CPU. The G5 ProLiants use the Intel 5000P chipset, which only supports ...


7

It depends on the model of server. However, each HP server model has option and upgrade parts available. For instance, if you had an HP ProLiant DL380 G6, you'd be able to install any of the processors listed in the option parts list. I've done this in the past where I'd have a 4-core CPU and needed to move to dual 6-core CPUs. It's entirely supported. ...


7

If there are any core-to-core communications then you'll find that generally a quad-core will be faster, sometimes significantly so, than two dual-cores. The reason is that the bandwidth and/or latency between cores on the same die can often be very much faster than any external connections. That said you don't mention specific processors so you could be ...


6

In general, no, though what you should be looking at is load, but temperatures. You might want to simulate the load (perhaps with superpi on windows, prime95 on linux and windows or some other stress test application, or your actual application) and run the process until the temperature stabilises -similar to what an overclocker would do. You want this ...


6

The term architecture covers a lot more than just the processor. There is a lot of other hardware components that are crucial to an OS kernel. The first example that comes to my mind is the interrupt controller, which is separate from the processor, but depending on actual model may be put inside the same chip as the processor. This entire collection of ...


5

Sorry for the delay spotting this question. There is a huge difference in performance between a dual-processor, dual-core setup and a single-processor, quad-core setup - the latter will be much quicker whichever make and model you go for, the main reason is because everything happens 'on-die' (although there's an argument to be had if you really want to get ...


5

Check the max memory you can put in each system - it's possible that you may be able to stuff more RAM into a 2xdualcore box than you can into a 1xquadcore box. And more RAM will likely help.


5

If its an OLTP server, and you are actually worried that it's going to CPU bottleneck maybe the app's really not an OLTP app. The way I spec out an OLTP server (in general) is: get a budget, if the answer is tell me how much it's going to cost, I usually say it'll cost every dime you give me, and we can always spend more- so how much are you going to ...


5

Thousands of scientific clusters worldwide consider it a suboptimal (or bad) situation when there are cores that are not at 100% CPU load. Real servers with proper server grade hardware are designed for this.


4

Are you saying that with say a 4 core 3Ghz CPU you want the OS to see it as a single core 12Ghz CPU? If that's the case, then no, you can't do that. Unless the application is specifically written to require access to CPU0 (and I'm not even sure if that's a possibility) it shouldn't matter. Toms hardware has a utility for having an application have ...


4

None. There is NO (!) sense today to install a 32 bit server. 32 bit will lock you into a total reinstall if you need more memory etc. - applications are another thing (makes quite often sense to run them 32 bit), but the OS should never be 32 bit.


4

That's a Xeon 5050. The cache size is 2x2MB ( i suspect whatever tool reported that 2MB was reporting per core) not 4MB as indicated on the Intel site http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=27210. It's not hard to figure this out. The socket for 5000P is LGA 771. You now go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Xeon_microprocessors search for 3000 MHz ...


4

I can't say that I've seen MTBF numbers on any CPU as you would on, say, storage hardware. Nor can I say that I've ever seen a CPU failure (other than dead-on-arrival chips) that I didn't suspect was caused by external forces. Heat, power issues, and (most often) human handling kill CPUs much more often than CPUs die on their own; that's the nature of it ...


4

The correct answer is "it really depends." vCPU sizing isn't just a case of "more cores = better than"; you need to keep in mind that relaxed co-scheduling can cause your system to run significantly more slowly in cases where you have multiple CPUs but are only stressing some of them. It's essentially the same shoe-shining problem that you might have seen if ...


4

nm is actually more of a reference to the generation of manufacturing process; a chip made with a 22 nm process will be more modern than a chip made using a 32 nm process. Wattage is especially important in servers that serve more than one cpu on the motherboard; if you're sporting a 64 cpus, you'll only have so many watts available to each core, depending ...


4

I think that will depend on so many different things that the only reasonable answer is "try it". Some things that could make a difference: Is the branch prediction significantly better in one of them? Is the layout of the pipeline different? Is the size of the L1 cache the same? Do various internal paths and paths to buses differ? Does the OS do power ...


4

Even within batches of the same processor, there will be differences in power load. In the overclocking community it's widely known that you can get "good" CPUs and "bad" CPUs. The bad ones generate a lot more heat under load (even at stock speeds) and thus will fail more quickly, thus limiting how much you can overclock them. This is generic, standard ...


3

You really need to know the model numbers for the two processors, then you will be able to learn more. There is a good comparison of Intel processors on wikipedia



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