Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

SSLv2 and SSLv3 are completely different (and both are now considered insecure). SSLv3 and TLSv1.0 are very similar, but have a few differences. You could consider TLSv1.0 as SSLv3.1 (in fact that's what happens within the records exchanged). It's just easier to compare the TLSv1.0 with TLSv1.1 and TLSv1.2 because they've all been edited within IETF and ...


7

From the research I've done, there is no current module for SPDY Draft 3. It appears development has basically stalled. You're out of luck unless you code your own module unfortunately.


6

git+ssh is git over the ssh client. As such it uses the SSH port (22) and not the git port.


5

Versions of Exchange newer than Exchange 2000 Server all use SMTP exclusively to transfer messages between servers in the same Exchange Organization. Prior versions of Exchange allowed for proprietary message transfer protocols. There were other protocol options available in 2000 and newer versions of Exchange, though. Exchange 2003 looks to be the last ...


5

You're confusing protocol with infrastructure. The DNS protocol is stateless, in that it determines that right now this name resolves to this IP address, and doesn't make assumptions about how long this will be. Higher level handlers deal with maintaining name resolution state, which is why the OS may cache DNS resolutions and deal with the cache based on ...


5

From my understanding, "Cisco IPSec" is just marketing speak for IPSec with some pre-defined settings for AH/ESP, tunnel/transport mode, etc. pp. When you read the RFCs, you see that they deliberately leave room for implementations...you, as the network admin setting up the IPSec connection have quite a lot of options to choose from for the protocol (and ...


4

My guess is they are some sort of encapsulated IP packet. 0x0800 == the Ethernet type for IP 0x45 == IPv4 with 5*4=20 byte header 0x00 == Type of Service 0x00d0 == length 0x4d58 == ID 0x0000 == offset 0x40 == TTL (64) 0x06 == protocol (TCP) Interesting links: NetBSD's ip.h header NetBSD's tcp.h header NetBSD's udp.h header btw, I don't suppose ...


3

You may want to read explanation on why spdy/2 is OK (and even better) for now: https://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/4407760#1084091


3

I will just echo the other answers but perhaps with a slightly different emphasis. There was a secure sockets protocol which was "owned" by Netscape which was called SSL version 2. A new version with a different record structure and security improvements also "owned" by Netscape was released and called SSL version 3. Inside the protocol in several places is ...


3

It looks like a series of TCP ACKs to ports 1030 and 1032. After reformatting the dump into a format that text2pcap can handle, e.g. 0000 00 24 c4 b8 7b 1a 00 90 7f 43 0f a1 08 00 45 00 ................ 0010 01 10 f4 4e 00 00 40 06 2f 13 cb 7a 9d e9 7b d0 ................ 0020 71 52 7a ed 04 06 8c 61 5d a9 01 f7 0c eb 50 10 ................ 0030 ff ff 58 b9 ...


3

Fundamentally, it is a nothing but a name change for a newer version of the protocol. I believe the main reason for that was to differentiate it from the older, informal standard mainly designed by Netscape after it became an official IETF standards track protocol. As was said in the answers to your earlier question, this doesn't mean SSLv3 and TLSv1.0 are ...


2

Topic firewalls only do blocking based on port number. However, application layer firewalls (17 filter, wfilter enterprise) do blocking based on protocol patterns. So if your firewall is an application layer firewall, your chatting program will not work.


2

You might consider using IPSEC. It a bit of an off-the-wall suggestion, I know, but assuming your server has a static IP address it would be fairly simple to setup a pre-shared key in your client's IPSEC policy that would encrypt all communication to the server transparently. At that point you don't really need to worry about what file transfer mechanisms ...


2

There is still no SFTP build in but there is "FTP Publishing Service" for IIS 7 which can do it.


2

Well, what do you mean by "syslog event"? In case you refer to syslog messages, RFC5424 unambiguously defines the syslog message syntax in its section 6, as how it is to be transmitted from one syslog application to another. In case you are referring to how they are stored in the log files by the receiving syslog application, typical syslog implementations ...


2

It's almost certainly HTTPS. If you want to offer android apps for download, you can just put the .apk file on your site and link to it. Mind you, only people who've ticked the option for "Allow unauthorised sources" will be able to download it. Why don't you just submit it to the Google Play store?


2

As you noted, AFP supports server side copies. The latest unreleased version of gvfs contains a number of improvements to gvfsd-afp to make it more reliable and faster. In my tests, it is able to get about 70MB/s for a large transfer on 1GBE and is able to duplicate a directory of 10000 files in 11 seconds which is not too bad. If server side copies are ...


2

Does a DNS resolver somehow know what protocol I'm using? No, but it can guess. I mean, a www. starting url is quite likely a web server. But that is totally not needed. THe provider ust rewrites the http requestas as they go through what is called a transparent proxy. And there they get the target IP and the name of the requested domain.


2

HTTP is NOT a secure protocol, it never has been, and is not meant to be. HTTPS IS the same protocol over a secure channel, though only if you use TLS 1.0 or newer (TLS 1.2 is highly recommended as 1.0 and 1.1 have known issues).


1

If you can't imagine what to use it for, you don't need it. It can be used for a lot of things, however. Central user database for multiple systems. This is the most-often used scenario. Keeping user settings Address books Storing configuration data (like puppet manifests) Arbitrary databases for tree-organized data and countless other possibilities.


1

I suggest you to do a tiny research before posting here. ;) Protocols have two kinds of interfaces: Peer to peer interface Service interface. Take IP for example. In a network or otherwisely host, it's service interface is what it provides for higher leveled protocols. But also IP can send data to the IPs in another host. So it uses its peer to peer ...


1

I found that I had to include the following in the registry for ie [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ProtocolExecute\callto] "WarnOnOpen"=dword:00000000 Not sure about firefox as of yet


1

My experience has been that IMAP puts orders of magnitude more load on a server than POP. POP basically gives all the emails a number you asked to retrieve or delete a message based on it's number, not much going on. IMAP on the other hand is a much more complex protocol, most significantly clients can perform server side searches of their mail. It's not ...


1

All the key factors in sizing an email server relate to volume. The fact that you're using IMAP means that you'll have a server-side storage need that differs greatly from POP3 but, beyond that, there's really not much about the protocol that radically changes the server's performance. You need to know about the incoming / outgoing message counts and ...


1

No one mentioned filezilla ftp server. It supports FTP over SSL/TLS. You can encrypt both auth phase and/or data transfers. Filezilla server creates self-signed certificates, making it ready to be used in a couple of minutes after installing it. Read its features list.


1

Postfix is an error resistant software. It tries to recover from internal errors and normally the master itself won't die. So a single error/warning is not considered as a termination trigger and Postfix will continue running instead. If you want to terminate Postfix on the first error/warning, you have to do it outside of Postfix. Watch the logfile for a ...


1

As a bit of clarification, I am mainly concerned with the typical home firewalls that most people might have, not a high-end corporate firewall. Most typical home firewalls don't block outbound connections by default. In fact most home based equipment do not even have a firewall, they just rely on NAT to prevent inbound connections. So personally I ...


1

You've given us very little information to work with here so I have to say that it depends on your setup - but typically you'd do this with via static entries in your routing table.


1

I think you need to look a little closer at what performance you are trying to measure. Are you trying to measure the performance of routing protocol convergence time, network throughput or something else? I suppose one project would be looking at the time it may take for a router to choose another path when the current path goes down. You could look at ...


1

VoiceXML is just a control structure for IVR's (and possibly other applications, but i have never seen it used outside of IVR's). It allows you to standardize your prompts, playback, call flow, etc. VXML isn't really designed for what you are looking to do with it. It was developed for IVR applications. To answer you questions: 1- No. 1a - You would need ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible