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3

Seems a duplicate of this: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/16756271/how-to-configure-nginx-to-serve-cached-content-only-when-backend-is-down-5xx-re In short, use proxy_cache_use_stale As an update, i tested this and it works fine. I did the test in my workstation where i have (for completeness): Fedora 23 nginx 1.8.1 configured as ssl terminator + ...


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Pretty much the same way. location /foo { rewrite ^/foo(.+)$ /$1 break; proxy_pass http://foo; } location /bar { rewrite ^/bar(.+)$ /$1 break; proxy_pass http://bar; }


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Unless I completely misread your question: You simply set up server blocks for each sub-domain and the define the correct reverse proxy for the root of that subdomain i.e. something along the lines of: server { server_name subdomain1.example.com; location / { proxy_pass http://hostname1:port1; } } server { ...


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To answer your question: "Why it shows upstream: "http://a.b.c.d:10062/"? Should not it show "wss://a.b.c.d:10062/"?" Nginx displays the URI that way because that's how it's provided in the configuration: proxy_pass http://a.b.c.d:10062; I don't think that detail is an indicator of your problem, since it seems you've followed the recommended syntax ...


2

You can forbid local forwarding in sshd_config, for example: Match User your_user AllowTcpForwarding no PermitOpen none It should not affect Dynamic forwarding/SOCKS proxy. Also I want the proxy to not proxy connections to anything in the server's internal network. This needs to be set up somewhere else then in ssh.


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As Jakuje mentioned, you can use options to forbid forwarding. Restricting Outbound Traffic by Owner Also I want the proxy to not proxy connections to anything in the server's internal network. You can you the iptables owner module to allow specific groups and users outbound in the OUTPUT rules to specific locations such as your ssh gateway server, ...


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To test whether Nginx is listening on port 80, on the same server, you can run: sudo netstat -nlp | grep nginx You should get back a result matching Nginx, reporting it listening on port 80. If that works, the next test is to access Nginx from inside the server via HTTP: curl http://127.0.0.1 If that works, the issue is a firewall or other networking ...


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Yes, if the proxy-server adds a HTTP header X-Forwarded-For, most of them do. Proxy can also add several other headers, depends of the actual software.


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You've two options: Use a separate IP address for the second server config. Note this could still be hosted on same server if you can configure two IP addresses on your network card or add another network card. The easier option, and to save an IP address, is to use a cert which works for both domains. More details here: Disabling SNI for specific ...


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I know this is an ancient post, but I think this answer will still be helpful: You can very easily do this through a SOCKS proxy with NetCat (nc). In your ~/.ssh/config you just add two lines, one that specifies which hosts you want to proxy, and a line to tell it how to connect via nc. Like so: ~/.ssh/config: (tested on OSX, should work on Linux too) ...


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I know this is a really old question, but all the answers I have seen require you to enter your NTLM credentials into some sort of python NTLM proxy handling code. These proxies are also prone to be buggy, in my experience. I created a solution for Windows, which automatically will detect corporate proxy system configurations and also automatically perform ...


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If the Squid is listening on port, let's say 3128, you can list all connected IP addresses to this port by using command like netstat in the server. For example: netstat -na | grep :3128 will display something like below: tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:3128 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN tcp 1 0 10.12.0.1:3128 ...



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