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10

It's an unsupported scenario because of the way PST files work: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/297019 Have you looked in Computer Management | Shared Folders yet? It might help identifying the culprit.


9

Microsoft says pst files should not be stored on network drives, so the long term fix is move them off the network drives. In the sort term, you can configure a mirror port on your switch, and then run wireshark on a computer attached to that port for a packet analysis. The switch might also be able to show bandwidth usage per port on a web interface ...


8

You can use Computer Management to see who has the file open. On the server with the PST files, right click My Computer, Click Manage. Under Shared Files select Open Files. Quick and easy


6

I am guessing the answer is no, but can multiple outlook users use the same PST file at the same time from a file server? Fortunately or unfortunately the answer is no - Outlook does an exclusive lock on the PST - even if its marked as read-only. The idea being to get some old stuff off of the Exchange server that a couple people would ...


6

It's not merely that MS is aware of the problem, they have KB articles that explain why you're not supposed to do this. Solving the problem can involve some or any of these approaches: Giving the users large enough Exchange quotas, which may also involve training them not to use email to store large PPT and other media files. If there's room on the ...


6

PSTs are not encrypted the way you would think. They do not use a standard encryption scheme, but a custom one. From the PST specification. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff385210%28office.12%29.aspx 4.1 Strength of Encoded PST Data Blocks This protocol uses two keyless cipher algorithms to encode the data blocks in the PST. These ...


6

As of Exchange 2007, you've been able to do this via powershell commands, e.g. Export-Mailbox and as of 2010 that's been your only (built in, at least) option.. Microsoft changed the powershell commands for Exchange 2010 SP1, and you should now use New-MailboxExportRequest to export data from a mailbox to a .pst file. I've given an example below. Rather ...


4

Scan OST is only useful if the user in question is not able to come into the office. Simply deleting the OST file (while outlook is shutdown) and restarting outlook will cause it to recreate the file. If a user is working offline and has an issue scan OST will recover the offline mail. I would say that the first time there is an issue with a users OST ...


4

To answer the question, go into computer management, click on Shared Folders, then Open Files.


4

There are projects like libpst allowing access to PST files from within Linux, but I doubt that anything aside from Microsoft's tools themselves will give you a "clean" PST output. I cannot see though why you could not connect to the IMAP server using Outlook from your machine and simply copy the messages to one or more PST stores mounted in Outlook - this ...


4

If Microsoft consider 5GB a large pst size what is their definition of 50GB of pst files? Likely among the line of "Idiotic". What is the actual limit of pst files that outlook can handle but remain stable? You will find that depending a lot on Hardware, too. Larger than 5gb lower than 50gb These days. Why does pst corruption occur? Memory ...


3

We have everyone store their .pst files on a network drive. The drive is mapped automatically with a logon script. We run an incremental backup on the drive each night and a full each month. It is an easy solution because it does not require any extra software to be installed on the users's computer. The nice part is you only have to worry about backing ...


3

Putting PST files on file servers is also a baaaaaad idea: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/297019


3

You are correct, the answer is no. Outlook locks the .pst file. You could export (via Outlook) it to something sharable. Access is an option, albeit not my favorite thing in the world.


3

Outlook can do that. Exchange on its own can't. There probably are third-party utilities around that can help, but using Outlook is probably the easiest approach. Just open Outlook, create a PST file, right-click on the PF you want to export, select "Copy Folder" and place it in the PST archive. Oh, and don't try to put all of that data into a single PST ...


2

You're not going to like this answer, but I would keep the messages on the server and improve your storage/backup options. When you export the messages you lose the advantages of single instance storage and you will only add complexity to the system. If you're using a hosted solution and they can't expand your storage I would consider moving to someone who ...


2

If your are using MS Exchange 2007, then you could use Managed Folders. With Managed Folders you can make custom rules for archiving/deleting old emails in client mailboxes. MS Exchange 2010 will include builtin email archiving. From users perspective, Outlook 2007/2003/2002 Add-in: Personal Folders Backup is pretty handy.


2

The Inbox Repair tool ScanPST.exe works on Microsoft Outlook 97-2002 Personal Folders File (.pst) and the Office Outlook Personal Folders File (.pst) data files in Microsoft Office Outlook 2003 and Microsoft Office Outlook 2007. The OST Integrity Check tool ScanOST.exe runs only on .ost files, which are Outlook Offline Folder files (synchronized offline ...


2

One other option (in addition to GFI MailArchiver) is Redgate's Exchange Server Archiver which seems to do everything you are looking for. I haven't used it myself, but they do have a free trial: http://www.red-gate.com/products/Exchange/index.htm


2

See the similar questions here for better answers: http://serverfault.com/questions/17958/e-mail-archiving-in-an-exchange-environment And I copy my answer again below, I always recommend GFI MailArchiver (http://www.gfi.com/mailarchiver/). I have been using it since 2006. Couldn't be happier. To be honest, it's a dream to whoever needs to manage the ...


2

PST files cannot be shared in the way you describe. When Outlook locks the PST file, nothing else can open the file at all. This is often noticed if backup software attempts to back up an open PST file. The suggestions for placing it in a read-only location are guaranteed to fail. Outlook will report a lack of permissions if it is unable to acquire a ...


2

In the past, I've used the Personal Folders Backup addin, but it only backs up when you close Outlook because the database needs to be closed. IMHO, the only fool-proof method is to run Exchange Server and back that up instead.


2

I just went through this, and you are entering a world of pain. Microsoft says not to put them on a network drive, ntbackup sucks (You will need admin rights to use volume shadow copy, there is a backup users group, but that doesn't actually work), there is an outlook plugin but then the users have to close outlook for it to work. In the end, I just stuck ...


2

Through the use of GPOs, you can manage what happens to .pst files. We auto-archive ours to the network where they're backed up regularly and it's easy enough to bypass them being saved to the local disk. Archiving email is no panacea for problems endemic to users. That is their need to save everything. You have to practically beat it into their heads ...


2

If you have Exchange the exmerge tool can do it. Not sure if it is any faster than Outlook, but it can deal with duplicates and will deal with multiple PSTs at a time. Exmerge is provided with Exchange 2003, but it apparently works with Exchange 2007. If you have a bunch of mailboxes to do and aren't using Exchange, it might be worth setting up Exchange ...


2

The Exchange Migration Wizard will do what you want; it became the Online Services Migration Tool a version or two ago. The simplest alternative is probably to set up a (physical or virtual) machine with 30 IMAP profiles in Outlook, each pointed to a different PST. Secure it appropriately and voila. Instant backup mechanism.


2

I think you might be out of luck. Microsoft actually has an official stance on this.


2

It turns out I needed to have both Outlook 64bit, 32bit will not work. I also needed to assign a role to my user: New-ManagementRoleAssignment –Role “Mailbox Import Export” –User “USER” I found the solution here.


2

Yes you're out of luck if your hosting provider won't help you out. Exchange discovery is ALWAYS done on the server (I've never even attempted it otherwise). If you give them the proper export-mailbox commands, will they run them for you and ship you the PST? Or better yet, if you're on Exchange 2010, will they run a mailbox discovery and give that to you? ...


2

You'll need admin rights depending on how Symantec is managed, but if you disable Symantec it should allow you to run whatever you want to run. Click HERE for a great post on how to disable most common AV/Security applications. I shouldn't have to note this, but I will anyway: Disabling Symantec is typically not a good idea. It's better to disconnect ...



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