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6

The public folder replicas and the default public folder database for a mailbox server are two different things. The public folder tree is an organization-level entity, unrelated to any physical database; each folder can have one or more replicas, residing on various mailbox servers. When a user needs to actually access a PF, Outlook connects to the ...


6

Massimo, I had actually wondered the same thing while attending an online "lunch and learn" a while back and was pointed here: http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2012/11/08/public-folders-in-the-new-office.aspx The basic premise from what the guy told me (and the article confirmed) is: Each public folder mailbox created contains info on the ...


4

Microsoft has docs describing the procedure in both the GUI and from PowerShell. This assumes you're using Exchange 2010 SP1 (which you really should be). You'll need a public folder database on the E2K10 server to replicate into, obviously. You can background about creating one from Microsoft, too. Once you've got the database created and configured ...


3

Use this Powershell script from the source PF Server C:\Get-PublicFolder -Recurse | Set-PublicFolder -Replicas 'Replica1','Replica2','Replica3' Where Replica1 and so on are your PF Database Names.


3

Exchange 2003 really does use Public Folders for things. Specifically, the Offline Address Book and Free/Busy information storage. However, you CAN nuke all user-generated data in there. That's probably a majority of the consumed space. The System store is in a different public folder root than the one the users see (IIRC, I'm on 2007 so may be ...


3

The short answer is that you have to have execute permission or higher (5) on a directory to list the contents of that directory. You can access files in a directory if you have read permission (4) but you have to know the name of the file because you can't list the contents of the directory. So, the user you are using to access the directory is not the ...


3

Are you serving it from a Mac OS X Server? I use it to serve a shared folder so that all members of a group have full control of it and everything in it, both from Mac clients connecting over AFP, and linux clients connecting over NFS. I don't have any SMB clients, so I can't comment on whether it works there. My hunch would be that it would, because the ...


3

Now that iPhones (iOS4?) support multiple exchange accounts and Outlook 2010 shows other users folders in exactly the same way as public folders you have another option which does not rely on 3rd party software. Create a dummy mailbox called Shared and give all your users full permissions to use access it using the "Manage Full Access Permission..." tool in ...


3

Using the GAL requires creating contact objects in Active Directory for each contact; this can't normally be done by standard users without custom delegations, and it requires special tools (ADUC, EMC). The main benefit is full integration with Outlook address book(s): if something is in the GAL, you automatically can see it in Outlook. With a public ...


3

Outlook can do that. Exchange on its own can't. There probably are third-party utilities around that can help, but using Outlook is probably the easiest approach. Just open Outlook, create a PST file, right-click on the PF you want to export, select "Copy Folder" and place it in the PST archive. Oh, and don't try to put all of that data into a single PST ...


3

I've run into this a number of times and it's been frustrating. More often than not, I wind up harassing a user who connects to that folder in order to get the full path from them. Once or twice I've just let it go and said "I can't do it without the full path". But it turns out that get-recipient does not require the full path in order to return a result. ...


2

I doubt you have "way too much data" in public folders. Public folders are stored using the same ESE engine that stores mailboxes, and I've seen Exchange 2003 installations with upwards of 100GB mailbox databases (though, arguably, they performed very badly compared to newer versions of Exchange, they did work fine). Diagnosing your "replication issues" is ...


2

I think that if you facing similar type of situation you should directly use a third party tool instead of running the script which might be sometimes wrong to perform. These tools has the ability to solve this problem of migrating more than 7 GB public folders data to the new exchange server 2010. Thanks


2

Public Folders use Roles to grant permissions "sets" to the PF tree. The default settings (at the root and for all new PF's) is for Anonymous users to have the "Create Items" permission and for Default users to have the Author role (Create items, Read items, Edit own items, Delete own items). The user who creates the PF (excluding the root of the PF tree) is ...


2

Yes, it's possible. You need to mail enable the PF in ESM. The PF will be assigned an email address based on your Default Recipient Policy, but the email address can be changed if needed. You'll need to make sure the Anonymous and Default entities have the Contributor role on the PF in order to recieve email to the PF.


2

You could just create a Shared Mailbox, and have the users add it to their outlook profile. My suggestion however is this: Install SharePoint Foundation 2010 and configure incoming e-mail. This way, you can enable the users to send their "team-related" information directly from Outlook and have it published in a document library on a sharepoint site which ...


2

I have resolved the issue, to solve this, we have to go into Active Directory Users and Computers. Under View, select Advanced Features. Now, under the /Microsoft Exchange System Objects folder, manually delete the Correspondance 81807753 object. To prevent this, you have to mail-disable the public folder before deleting it from the public folders.


2

Even if nobody touches those files for 6 months, I still wouldn't let them disappear for a while. You'll save yourself a lot of potential headaches by replicating these PFs to the 2010 box and simply not making them accessible to the users, if you truly want to phase them out (I bet you can create the PF DB, replicate, then take it offline and get it off ...


2

You may have luck examining the PR_CREATOR_NAME and PR_LAST_MODIFIER_NAME MAPI properties on the items. You can use the MDBVU32 utility to view these properties (background on doing that is available in KB253291). On my test machine (a Customer's E2K3 server I had close at-hand), though, I found that items I copied from my "Inbox" folder to a public folder ...


2

Here is a posting from technet detailing this exact issue http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en/exchangesvrgeneral/thread/46124982-7161-4241-b6e0-093cedeeda76 Looks like using ADSI Edit to delete out the public folders was the final step needed


2

I ended up installing the Exchange 2003 administrative tools on a Windows Server 2003 computer and moving the container using Exchange 2003's System Manager, as would be the case in a standard 2003-2007 transition.


1

Here you go: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa997560(EXCHG.80).aspx


1

We have used Public Folder contact lists as distribution lists (bad practice, I know), but this worked for me. Open the contact list. Save as a text file. Open the text file with excel. The contact name and the email address will be in two different columns.


1

Looks like ADSIedit is the only way to get rid of this one.


1

The settings are not recursive. See http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa997966.aspx for a list of scripts that are supplied with Exchange 2010 to help with what you want to do. You will probably want to run AddReplicaToPFRecursive.ps1


1

If it came be done, it would be located by going to Exchange System Manager > Expand Servers > Right click on your server and go to Properties > Diagnostics Logging tab > MSExchangeIS > Public Folders. I don't recall which one does it, either General or Access Control, maybe Views. Unfortunately it doesn't put it into a log file. It shows up in the ...


1

Yes, you want to install PFDAVDadmin from Microsoft. It allows all kinds of access/insight into the murky depths of Exchange. Among other things, it will allow you to export permissions of your public folders (but it does so much more...) It's ugly and a little obtuse. Read the instructions (link to the FM on the linked download page.)


1

Turned out it was a setting buried in our spam filter. Problem resolved.



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