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In short, the ssh -i option should point to the private key file (usually "id_rsa"). man ssh ... -i identity_file Selects a file from which the identity (private key) for RSA or DSA authentication is read. The default is ~/.ssh/identity for protocol version 1, and ~/.ssh/id_rsa and ~/.ssh/id_dsa for protocol version 2. Identity files may ...


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SSH authorization is basicly in 3 files for each user id_rsa - private key used to authorize id_rsa.pub - public key authorized_keys - file which contains public keys used to login. Put your X user public key on C server in authorized_keys that belong to Y user. Remember about correct permissions! For access without password for all users you ...


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This is becoming an increasingly common misconception around ssh authorisation. Merely having a public keyfile on a remote server doesn't give anyone the ability to authenticate using the corresponding private key. Do a man sshd and search for information about the authorized_keys file. This file, remoteserver:~remoteuser/.ssh/authorized_keys, is what ...


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It's would be best to have them create their own rsa/dsa keys (or you can do it for them and sent the keys to them), and add the pub key to the authorized_keys file. i.e. cat new_rsa_id.pub >> authorized_keys. Each line in the authorized keys relates to a id_rsa key. Also, the passphrase is optional. I always find it to be an annoyance unless company ...


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You can use the public key for as many clients as you want. Adding the file to the remote host is easy with ssh-copy-id: ssh-copy-id -i /path/to/id_rsa.pub user@host Edit: Should you mean that you want to access the remote host from another computer, you would have to copy the private key file to this machine (but never to the remote machine you want ...


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Uhm... this is not a good idea, why would you use your pass phrase as comment (-C option)? Just use ssh-keygen -b 2048 -t rsa. You don't need to set any permissions by default. You create the key as the user you want to have login on the remote machine and then: cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh user@server 'cat - >> ~/.ssh/authorized_keys' To get the ...


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You can't connect with the public key. The public key (id_rsa.pub) shall be located on the server side while the private key (id_rsa) should be located on the client side. To install the key on Machine 2: cat id_rsa.pub >> /home/vfx_30/.ssh/authorized_keys # sometimes this file is called authorized_keys2 And connecting from Machine 1: ssh -i ...


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You are trying to use the key backwards. You created a key pair, which could be used to make ssh connections from machine 2. Next you are trying to establish a connection from machine 1, which has no key pair at all. To make it work first create a key pair on machine 1. You can create it with ssh-keygen, just like you did on machine 2. Optionally edit ...


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sshd normally reads authorized public keys from a file named .ssh/authorized_keys in each user's home directory. Each user would normally have their own copy of this file and would normally maintain it themselves. The name of this authorized_keys file can be specified in the sshd_config file through the AuthorizedKeysFile directive. The default value of ...


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You could add this to the /etc/skel directory which is used as a template for newly created users. If you want this for only a specific set of users, create an additional skel dir and use this during user creation.


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You really need to get your terminology straight. You want to change the hostname and have myproductionsite.com point to your servers IP, I guess. Also, your question appears to be if you still will be able to authenticate with the public key after this change and not if an already running SSH session will survive this (that's what we call a connection). ...



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