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17

I only recently was working on this, and while I can't give you an answer, I can give some observations: For $500 you won't get much of a developer laptop - $500 will get you a consumer laptop from BestBuy (or Dell if you order online). If that really is your budget all I can recommend is to look at the specs and try and fill the following which are in ...


16

Traditionally nothing, unless you enjoy trying to troubleshoot hardware ^^ Doing enthusiast PCs is one thing, and definitely fun and rewarding as well - upgrading with parts from all over the world getting it to work in unison. A single server then, one could find that fun to mess around with as well or as a learning experience. For a bunch of servers? No ...


15

Form factor is the main difference, and it doesn't take too many servers (5 or 6) before you really want rackmounted gear. You can get telco 'relay' racks for ~$100 or so, and if you've got rackmounted servers then all 6 or 10 of them (depending on height) will fit in one rack, taking up about 3sqft of space... whereas if you try and put 6 full towers in a ...


14

My thoughts ... 1- Durability and serviceability -- the "business class" systems are designed and engineered to be standardized and easily serviced. 2- Standard components and designs -- a line of machines are similar, so the techs don't have to figure out a bunch of systems. This is reliably worth several hundred dollars per machine over it's life. 3- ...


11

First, check out the domain on whois, and do a complete DNS lookup. There isn't a web site, but is there an email domain in use? If you browse to the site, do you get an error, or is it "parked"? Does the registrant have lots of domains or just a few? Look on sites like sedo.com to get an idea on pricing. Then, send an email to the admin contact, ...


10

This is the eternal question, but there is only one simple answer: It is always the wrong time. Whenever you buy anything remotely technical (computers, cars, ...) you will always have the "new model" available relatively shortly after your purchase, or the prices just drop. However there is some "soft" advice: Do not buy the latest and greatest products, ...


8

In addition to the specific reasons, I find that drawing an analogy to a different business unit helps to put these scary technology concepts into a comfortable framework. Question - I can buy TurboTax for $50 to do my taxes, why do we need to pay an entire department to do the same thing for the company? Answer - because it's more complicated. IT ...


8

I got my replacement battery from batteries plus for my laptop. It's worked as good as the original HP battery when it was new. In fact according to Linux it's still at 100% the batteries rated capacity and it's about 6 months old now. It wasn't as cheap as the batteries on ebay but it all came down to if I wasn't happy with it I wanted the option to take ...


8

Who covers the cost? I assume the company Sure the company. COmpany wants it, company pays it. Enforce the leaving staff to uninstall all software owned by company? Not needed. Have them sign a waiver when they get it that they understand they do not own the license and have to uninstall it when they leave. Keep all documentation on your side. ...


7

Rack rails. Never ever ever buy rails from the server manufacturer. There is an entire industry devoted to third party rack rails, and their products are better and as much as 80% less expensive.


7

The decision ultimately comes down to budgets and money, but what other factors do you consider? Time? Expertise? Integration with other systems? Time and again, I've seen companies outsource their application hosting...and (implicitly) responsibility. That's when folks start only considering the marketed costs. This frequently leads to "Well, Sparkle ...


7

If I've got a server-class processor, a RAID controller, and a good server OS, what would I lose by using a "workstation"? You would lose very little, but there is a difference between "workstation" and "server" level products. Typically, they're the parts they don't list, like motherboards, chipsets, buses, etc. etc. Server "level" type ...


7

Do you speak a foreign language? Preferably an ancient one? Answering the phone in Sumerian tends to confuse the cold callers. Warn the family before you start doing it. The first time I did it they called the SWAT team thinking my office had been taken over by pirates. Kidding aside... When you say that you're "fairly civil" might that mean that you're ...


6

You should ask yourself these questions when you're thinking about outsourcing applications: Does my staff lack any of the right skills or depth needed? Am I not certain I can recover from outages quickly enough? Do I have problems keeping pace with the 18 to 36 month technology cycle? Do daily operations and keeping the systems running keep me from ...


5

If you don't anticipate a rack in your near future, rack mountable servers will just be a waste of money. They're designed with a rack environment in mind (form factor, obviously, but also the cooling and port/button/drive access) and cost more than an equivalent tower server. Tower servers are generally easier to place and physically work on outside of a ...


5

Why not look at a HP ML-series server, they come as towers but are easily converted to be rack-mounted cheaply if required. In particular the new ML350/370 G6's (1/2 Nehalem Xeons, upto 144GB mem, 24 disks) are nice-enough machines for the money (http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/en/WF04a/15351-15351-241434-241646-241477.html)


5

External stuff. Don't buy the keyboard, mouse, screen, net switches, printers, USB memory etc. All that stuff they try to shove you in, when you're buying server. They'll re-branded stuff, that you can by in any store for half a price, and they don't really heave any effect on performance nor stability of the server. If you need the server, buy only the ...


5

Well, there are seasons and special dates when equipment goes down in price: After, or On a holiday (maybe be looking for a memorial-day sale near you or online) Back to school sales (Doesn't help you much since you'd need to wait a few months) Also, whenever a new model comes out, the older model goes down in price (sometimes substantially.


5

(this is partially covered in The Practice of System and Network Administration's chapter on desktop machines) Basically, consumer laptops use the cheapest video chip, sound processor, etc. that the vendor can find that week. A business-class laptop changes chipsets once or twice a year, on a schedule that is predictable. This gives you the ability to ...


5

For large companies we work with, we recommend that IT spec out three laptops: small+light, big+powerful, and something in between. So to use Dell for example, we usually spec the latest Latitude D4x0, D6x0 and D8x0 systems. We usually get the biggest hard disk and the most RAM available when we order them, since we expect to get up to three years of life ...


5

Big consideration here...you don't mention how many people are using this server, and you don't talk about how important this system will be for your business purposes. Servers come with better hardware and support. For example, most Dell servers have dual gigabit nics, RAID hardware and hot-swap bays, dual power supplies, and when you call them and tell ...


5

Purchase. It's usually cheaper since your large 1u rack server companies are buying by the 1000s and you're not. Additionally when you need more the next month, they show up in five days. As a startup your time is better spent on building features, doing performance testing, etc which are all things you can't buy.


5

Buy the cheapest HP LaserJet available that supports PostScript and PCL 6.


5

Have used CDW and had no issues. Good selection but price could be a bit better. But they always work!


4

The prices will always drop in the week after you made your purchase.


4

I would skimp on the floppy drive :)


4

Presuming that your "lab" isn't a quasi-data center, skimp on the lights out features (HP iLo, Dell DRAC, IBM RSA), don't buy redundant power supplies or SAS disk. Another way to save money is to buy promotional "Express" configurations that are ready to ship, buy refurbished or whatever your local reseller has lying about.


4

I agree with Bravax's points. In addition to that I would pay attention to the following things: Server CPU should support VT technology 64 Bit is key for a virtual server (you want a lot of memory) Fast and good quality network cards Ram, Ram, Ram A good quality raid controller and some fast (at least 7200rpm) hard disks (I prefer a striped RAID set on my ...


4

When Sun had pretty logos on the top of their 1U servers, a coworker was seriously considering buying one and mounting it on the wall ("bottom" of server mounted flat on wall, rotated so it looked like a diamond) as a home server / art installation. In the end he didn't do it because of the fan noise. Would have looked cool though =).



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