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12

PXE booting is awesome. I manage a cluster of about 20 physical machines that are located on the opposite side of the globe, and they're all installed automatically without any physical intervention from anyone at the DC. I couldn't do my job nearly so well without PXE booting -- all the other remote installation options (virtual media, getting a DC tech ...


9

There aren't standards in PXE for Wifi that make this feasible. Apple does "wireless netboot" functionality in some of their models, but this isn't going to help you with PXE booting PCs because it's purely proprietary. Even if you could do this, I question the performance, reliability, and efficiency of using this method. You'd be soaking up a massive ...


9

There's no such thing as a "PXE Server" per-se. The host gets information from a DHCP or BOOTP server, which includes the address of a TFTP server (called 'next-server'). PXE is the software running (usually) from firmware that collects the DHCP/BOOTP information, contacts the TFTP server, downloads various information and eventually starts an Operating ...


8

There's always more than one way to do anything :) Solution 1 Motherboards with one of each? Blacklist whichever module (ethtool -i eth0) is supporting the Realtek card. Ubuntu supports module_name.blacklist=yes to blacklist it at boot and you should be able to change the modprobe options in the preseed environment so that it doesn't get probed later. ...


8

Overview You can distribute a WinPE image using pxelinux or any other PXE boot technology. That will get you a scriptable command prompt able to launch an unattended install. You can use WAIK to create an unattend.xml file that's called during setup where you can create your own build scripts that meet whatever it is that your needs are. The unattend file ...


7

Don't use the emulated Intel cards for PXE boot, choose another, and you're fine. P.S. Oh, it's already been stated (can't the questions be closed then?)


7

Why start with the DRACs at all? Dell can ship servers with a preconfigured RAID setup, so all you need is autodeploy an OS on all of them (kickstart/pxe/foreman/whatever you prefer), and then configure the DRACs locally using racadm when you have an OS already running on the hosts. That, in turn, can also be automated using Puppet/Chef/Ansible/Salt/etc


6

The 1st thing I've spotted was that you are using "-s /tftpboot" in xinetd.conf and adding the dhcpd.conf "root-path" option. Setting the "-s" option for tftpd means that is the "/" directory as seen for tftp client. So your dhcpd.conf should only have "filname /pxeboot", without the root-path option. From "man tftpd": -s Change root directory on ...


6

You could try Windows Deployment Services or you could use something like Ghost Solution Suite or if you want freeware you can use CloneZilla All of them support PXE boot. EDIT: I don't think there is such a thing as what you are looking for. A sysprep'd image being written to disk does the same job as stage 1 of the windows install - specifically format ...


6

While you can set up a second DHCP server on a network, there is no reliable way to get a computer to prefer its responses. More importantly, though, you should not be trying to circumvent your company's policy. This is unprofessional. If you need access to the DHCP server, make a case for it to your manager.


5

This should be possible with ipmitool. Just run: ipmitool chassis bootdev pxe And your next boot should be a PXE boot. Edit: This doesn't seem to work for HP iLO2. However, you can SSH in to the iLO2 interface and reconfigure it there by issuing set /system1/bootconfig1/bootsource5 bootorder=1 On systems that don't support booting from USB key it will ...


5

The PXE ROM needs a "next-server" directive from the DHCP server in order to find and load the bootloader (be it grub, pxelinux or any other bootloader). If a "next-server" isn't supplied, it is up to the PXE ROM to decice what to do. You'll have to look at your network card bios configuration and see if there is an option to maybe specify the server ...


5

There is this thing called gpxe (read about it here), which allows you to load the PXE stuff from a floppy, for example.


5

http://rom-o-matic.net/ is a site where you can generate bootable images for performing pxe boot. Another alternative is to stick another network card in the machine that does have a boot ROM. You can just use it for network booting, and then use the other network interface for all other network activities. BTW, there is a pretty good (geeky) Google Tech ...


5

"Media test failure", as emphasized by "check cable" means that there is no link detected on the local NIC. Do you have the link led on for this machine ? If so, you might assume a buggy PXE/bios rom. If not, make a physical fix.


5

You could use something like VirtualBox to PXE boot a virtual machine (and then use wireshark, etc, to trace the traffic over your physical interface).


5

You can try to add PXELINUX IPAPPEND 2 option to your pxelinux.cfg file to tell init scripts to use the interface that did the PXE boot: /var/lib/tftpboot/pxelinux.cfg/default LABEL linux KERNEL /ubuntu/casper/vmlinuz APPEND initrd=/ubuntu/casper/initrd.gz root=/dev/nfs boot=casper netboot=nfs nfsroot=192.168.1.1:/var/lib/tftpboot/ubuntu -- ...


5

OK, first let's clear up a few misconceptions: As MailQ has pointed out, most diskless server configurations require NFS (since you mentioned ubuntu in the comments, check out their instructions). It doesn't HAVE to be NFS (the Network File System from Sun), but it does have to be A Network File System -- you can't PXE load a whole OS image over the ...


5

Altering the append with desired parameters definitely won't help from PXELINUX in this setup, as the boot disk has its own ISOLINUX handling the kernel boot. Two ways to fix this. The simpler option: extract the ISO, modify the isolinux/isolinux.cfg file's append line with the needed boot arguments, re-pack the ISO. Have PXELINUX chain to the modified ...


4

So I figured this out with the help of a coworker. Its a dirty, dirty hack, but it works! HP Proliants (at least now, at the end of 2009) will try to boot from a CDROM, then try the harddisk, then try a USB stick, and then they'll do a PXE boot. Since I am reimaging servers anyway, I've figured out that if we zap the boot sector anyway and immediately ...


4

PXE is FAST, assuming you aren't in the stone age using 10BASET. With gigabit being the standard, I don't think you should notice any sort of slowdowns. Yes you need 1 computer to house the information for all the boot images, and optionally even the mount points for the OS. Linux does support having its mount points on remote servers, which generally most ...


4

I don't know FOG, but it should work just fine if the image can boot from NFS (which is probably going to be the sticking point for the rolled releases like pfSense). You should be able to follow the basic instructions in the handbook and get it working. I'd also consider just running a virtual machine to test these things out. QEmu runs great on fBSD. ...


4

There is a CentOS virtual application that does (almost) all of this already. It's called the Ultimate Deployment Appliance. There's a few things in your list it doesn't support (switching back to the local disk, a proper GUI (it's just a text-based menu) for backgrounds, etc. But I think you'll find that's a limitation of PXE rather than the appliance). ...


4

You wouldn't ordinarily have 2 DHCP servers on the same subnet. That's asking for big problems. You would have one DHCP server that handles both tasks.


4

We faced the same problem and found the following to be excellent for explanations: http://gparted-forum.surf4.info/viewtopic.php?id=16400 http://sourceforge.net/projects/clonezilla/forums/forum/663168/topic/4511817 Our configuration: Debian/kFreeBSD (sid) tftp-hpa (5.2-4) Clonezilla Live Image (current stable 1.2.12-67) The cause of the problem, ...


4

There is absolutely zero requirement for the DHCP server to be the same machine as the TFTP server (there's no such thing as a "PXE server"). You simply configure the DHCP server to provide the necessary DHCP options for PXE booting. Good luck managing that on a dinky toy consumer router, though.


4

You can see a step-by-step tutorial here: http://www.smop.co.uk/mediawiki/index.php/PXE_booting_floppy_images Or try to search for "boot ISO via PXE", "boot DOS via PXE", etc. Extended edit The following is tested and working. All you need is the Full FreeDOS ISO, a recent Linux LiveCD, an installed Linux and a Virtual Machine. Then this is what I ...


4

Yes, you can tell Linux to mount an NFS partition or NBD as the root partition. There's likely to be support for a lot of other network filesystems and block devices too, because the initrd can do magical things; NFS and NBD just happen to be the two that I'm most familiar with in this scenario. This is a good write-up of how you might do it for NFS, while ...


4

EFI BC = EFI Byte Code. EFI Byte Code is a processor agnostic language for device drivers, PXE, and other EFI extensions so that the code can be written once and run on any supporting platform.


4

You shouldn't be creating your own DHCP service at all without the permission of the network and system administrators, in fact doing so without their permission should be a firing offence. It's exactly this kind of behaviour which underlines why DHCP in anything but a client-only environment is dangerous. So to reiterate - don't do this, it's wrong.



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