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73

This is a strange question, but I'm gonna attempt to answer it anyway. All electrical fires must be extinguished carefully. Especially if they're still live. Fire departments will all recommend the use of a CO2 extinguisher. In a datacentre environment, however, I'd (But I don't recommend you) do one of two things. Hit the EPO (Emergency Power Off) ...


64

If your servers use front to back flow-through cooling, as most rack mounted servers do, leaving gaps can actually hurt cooling. You don't want the cold air to have any way to get to the hot aisle except through the server itself. If you need to leave gaps (for power concerns, floor weight issues, etc) you should use blanking panels so air can't pass ...


43

Use cables as close to the correct length as possible. Spare cable should be coiled away from the concentrator - so spare power cable gets coiled next to the machine, not the powerstrip, and spare network cable next to the machine, not the hub. Don't be stingy with cable ties, be they zip ties or velcro pulls. When in doubt, use an extra, and don't ...


38

While time-consuming, removing everything altogether and putting it back in the new location is the best way to move a server. Trying to take shortcuts will only risk bending your rails, making them unusable. (Bent rails are hard - if not impossible - to bend back.) Never mind the possibility of dropping your server outright, possibly damaging yourself, ...


33

Why is everyone giving the wrong answer? It's called a scissor lift: They make servers that are hundreds of pounds. Lots of storage arrays are far more than that. There comes a time when you don't want to rely on hands that were, most likely, just reaching for greasy potato chips. Use the actual tool if server lifting is an issue.


32

Recycle an old server rack? Arguments against Unsafe : someone could injure themselves by colliding with a server that should not be there. The doors are now more of a hindrance than a help and should be removed. No doors = no security. Defeats the purpose of having a rack. Maintainance of older racks is more time-consuming than more modern racks. Looks ...


26

Buy them. And buy them from alternative sources if you need to be frugal - Craigslist, Ebay, Dell Outlet, etc. If you end up building them - go with SuperMicro - great gear. But Commercial Servers will have better out of bandwidth management, better systems management, better support, etc. And if you need to pinch pennies - use third party memory (i.e. ...


26

It's easy to look at pictures of hard drive caddies and storage arrays but that isn't going to help. As I'm sure you know, it's not just about getting a large amount of disks and throwing them into a rack - you need to think about how they will be accessed, monitored, controlled, etc. I'm also a little confused - in your question title you talk about "many" ...


25

It's really difficult to buy an unsuitable rack today if you're purchasing new. I usually encounter generic, custom or unbranded racks, APC Netshelter, Dell and HP (10642 G1 and G2 models) in the field. They've all been solid and have handled the systems and equipment I've needed to mount within them. The basics: Begin with your servers. Why not match ...


23

Speaking from organizational experience at my last job, a small fire in one rack can turn into a big fire with a whole rack, and very shortly afterwards, the rack next to it as well. Fire spreads fast. Once the insulation jackets of all of those power and Ethernet cables gets involved it travels. It travels really fast. Then the flames start tickling the ...


20

It may sound like a joke, but one important consideration are the holes of the frame; there are two types, a relatively uncommon threaded hole and the standard square hole for cage nuts. As most devices you can buy are prepared for the square hole, this is a safer bet. But even then, be careful when you buy devices. If you anticipate any growth, you ...


20

Considering you're upgrading from tables to a rack, you don't need to get too fancy with it. Accessories: Doors, Front Very handy for keeping questing fingers from pressing buttons (or pulling levers) they shouldn't. Also makes for a neater appearance; that can actually count for things! Should be fully perforated, I don't think they're even selling ...


19

Switches need to be reverse mounted (ie, their ports should face the same way that the server ports do, toward the back of the rack). Also, maybe you can get some use from this: http://www.standalone-sysadmin.com/blog/2008/06/howto-racks-and-rackmounting/


18

KVM over IP is nice, but depending on where you work it can be a hard sell to make the case and get your management to cut the check. If you use HP Proliant servers, you can order them with iLo, absorbing most of the remote management costs into the price of the server. Don't forget to budget the extra network ports you'll need. If you're retrofitting, ...


18

Blade servers are small, high-density, low form-factor computers, designed for maximum power in a small space. A blade server is mounted within a chassis, and the chassis typically takes on a lot of functions and parts that were previously done by the individual host. The chassis itself will hold the power supplies (resulting in less wasted power from ...


18

Always, always, always take the time to strip out those cables you aren't using anymore. Pull it all the way out of the rack/patch panel, coil it up and put it away (or throw it away, as appropriate). And when you're getting rid of dodgy cables. Cut off one or both ends. They will come back and haunt you if you don't.


18

I have never skipped rack units between rackmount devices in a cabinet. If a manufacturer instructed me to skip U's between devices I would, but I've never seen such a recommendation. I would expect that any device designed for rack mounting would exhaust its heat through either the front or rear panels. Some heat is going to be conducted through the rails ...


18

It is probably not place at the bottom accidentally. Typically the UPS is the heaviest thing in the rack. Meaning it is easiest to install it at the bottom where you don't have to lift it up. One might argue, that putting the heaviest things at the bottom should also make it more stable. If it was top-heavy, and not bolted down, then there is the remote ...


18

Racks are inexpensive and can purchased used or refurbished. It's nearly impossible to go wrong with a modern rack. The cost of doing this the right way is so low that any janky, tacky or unprofessional solution is just adding to your technical debt. Temporary workarounds always seem to become permanent or otherwise end poorly. A good example is this server ...


17

Because typically, networking gear goes into its own racks, and servers go into their own racks. The network rack will often have patch panels in it, also on the front, so that the cables all just go into cable management - on the side of the racks and/or across the front of the racks.


17

Some things I have learned looking after a smallish machine room of 6 cages: I have had good luck with the APC netshelter, 42U unit. Make sure its long enough to accomodate your rackmount equipment Make sure you have the rails for your equipment - they are often mated to your case Account for space eaten by UPS unit(s), I put mine in the bottom of the rack ...


17

Most rack mount servers come with rails. There are two types of racks: square hole, and round hole. If you got an APC rack, it's probably a square hole rack. Depending on the manufacturer of the rack mount server, you can either mount the server rails "toollessly" or with screws. The toolless method is preferable as it is easier and faster. Any server ...


17

Definitely extinguish the fire without regard for the rest of the servers on the same rack. Any properly designed data center will have backup servers at another location for the applications to fall back on. It is better to lose a rack of servers than to lose a life or the whole data center.


16

Buy. Warranty. Engineering Design - heat, airflow Parts all guranteed to work together We bought a server from a local white box store. worst server we ever had. Built exactly to our specs, but the RAID card didn't like the Motherboard. Ended up costing us more than the price of the server in strange errors, testing, rebuilding, ordering other cards, ...


16

Sounds like quite the argument for not using a shared server room facility, but what you can/should do to fairly easily avoid this problem is: Physical access controls on the server room. Could be as simple as a good lock and a key, an RFID badge, or even biometric scanners, but make it something. If you prevent who has access to the room with a good ...


15

Form factor is the main difference, and it doesn't take too many servers (5 or 6) before you really want rackmounted gear. You can get telco 'relay' racks for ~$100 or so, and if you've got rackmounted servers then all 6 or 10 of them (depending on height) will fit in one rack, taking up about 3sqft of space... whereas if you try and put 6 full towers in a ...


15

Only if you don't have any problems replacing it after it falls. I wouldn't chance it.


14

In our data center we do not leave gaps. We have cool air coming up from the floor and gaps cause airflow problems. If we do have a gap for some reason we cover it with a blank plate. Adding blank plates immediately made the tops of our cold aisles colder and our hot aisles hotter. I don't think I have the data or graphs anymore but the difference was ...


14

I like to use 1U front and rear cable management above and below my patch panels. This mostly applies to 2-post installs... As for the cabling bundle, it should be secured zip-tied and routed appropriately... However, a 4-post example from my past... Size the run, bundle with slack, secure along the side of cabinet...


13

UPS location Bottom. Really. All that lead acid out-weighs a solid steel server any day. You want that in the bottom. Unlike servers, it'll get pulled out next to never. It'll provide stability in the bottom of the rack. Also by not putting all that weight at the top, your rack is less likely to act like a metronome in the case of some heavy rocking. ...



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