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0

The other answers work, but if you don't want to stop your array prematurely, see here: How-to change the name of an MD device (mdadm) (from superuser)


1

Reading your configuration, I see: 8 disks total... Disks 1,2,3,4 are in a RAID 1+0 array. Disks 5,6 are in a RAID 0 stripe. Disks 7,8 are in a RAID 0 stripe. I'm not going to ask why you have two RAID 0 arrays. Surprisingly, they're healthy! It looks like disk 2 was replaced. It's paired with disk 4. You could likely have READ errors on disk 4 that ...


1

The only difference I see is this line: #DEVICE partitions This is commented out in the generated config file but not yours. I'd just uncomment that and commit the changes. Warnings like that tend to be a "head's up" thing rather than an actual problem if the configurations line up.


-1

The read speed of RAID 1 depends on the chip on RAID card. The cheap card only read from 1 disk. Expensive card can read concurrent from 2 or more hard drives at the same time for better performance.


7

poige is exactly right about the write cache, but here are more details. dd with zeros and using write cache is not the right way to benchmark (unless you want to test the write cache of course, which is probably only useful for a file system, to see how much it syncs metadata, creates new files, etc.) (and likely dd is always the wrong type of benchmark, ...


9

The key to the answer to your question is read-ahead. Once upon a time, I also happened to have that issue. IOW, for optimal sequential read performance all disks should be permanently involved into Input. When you use dd w/o directio (see man dd), write operation is not being performed immediately, but goes through OS cache, so it has more chances to ...


2

It's possible to recover the data, provided no other actions have been taken on the array. You could do a few things like taking an image of the individual disks (via Clonezilla/dd/etc.) and keeping that as a fallback... The common approach is to try to either recreate the array with the same settings/RAID/level/strip size and boot via a recovery CD to ...


2

I bought 6 of the 1.2tb cards in the last couple months. One of them has already failed. So I would absolutely raid them. I used windows active disk mirror. The drive failed with the message "missing LEB map". I was told it would need to be swapped out. But to get the RMA approved I would need to take pictures on both sides of the failed card (requiring a ...


0

No, there is no such method to convert a RAID6 into a RAID10 on LSI. You have to backup, recreate your RAID and restore the data. As jski noted, your reliability will drop, while your speed will increase.


0

When we researched a similar problem using an LSi 9271-8i, there wasn't a method of accomplishing this; if there were, I'd imagine it would be the kind of thing that would take an incredible amount of time as well. And yes, you'll definitely notice a read/write speed increase changing to RAID10, but your reliability will effectively drop to 1 drive failure ...


1

The photo looks like your system is an HP ProLiant DL360 G6 or G7 1U rackmount server. I saw your note about defective HP disks. I work with a considerable number of HP servers and haven't seen this as a widespread problem. I do think that you could provide more information about the Smart Array RAID controller's status during the system's POST process. ...


3

If your description of the scenario is accurate, then your partition table is unharmed. You may however have lost everything else on the disk. Your attempt to use fsck is failing, because you are not taking the lvm layer into account. When you wrote to md0, you didn't overwrite the start of the ext2 file system, you overwrote the start of the lvm physical ...


1

No the existing data will not be erased when you add a disk to the SHR array. The message is simply saying the new drive being added will be formatted. You data and applications will actually remain available during the expansion process; there is no need at all to even stop using the NAS whilst SHR Vertical Expansion is taking place. That said - before ...


1

Can you tell us what operating system you're wiring with? That's a big detail. I'll assume Red Hat or CentOS... An HP Gen8 server under a modern OS will be using the HPSA driver, not CCISS. So your drives will be /dev/sdX... e.g. /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, etc. (maybe this isn't a Gen8 server) Regardless, assuming RHEL or CentOS, you'll need the zerombr parameter ...


2

I cannot say specifically, however - if you add a disk to a RAID config, it'll need to be wiped to become part of your RAID. Losing that data is - as you surmised - inevitable. When it comes to the original data though, the answer is a little more complex - RAID, depending on type, will differ in where it writes data in a two drive configuration, as opposed ...


0

According to this user manual (which some idiot disabled copying text from), the "Foreign" state means that the controller sees that there is RAID configuration information on the drive but to prevent accidentally screwing up the data, it will not automatically use the drive unless you first scan the drive to examine the configuration. Apparently you will be ...


1

Current Adaptec controllers should expose disks without Adaptec raid label as JBOD by default. (Disclaimer: untested)


0

For 2 drives with separate Windows Installations where one volume needs to be removed, and the OS is being stubborn this should work. After setting the drive to inactive, if the drive is giving you trouble the MBR may need to be changed. If you are using GRUB or another bootloader this most likely will be destroyed. Run DISKPART elevated. Type LIST VOLUME ...


0

Check the following article from Red Hat; CentOS is nothing but RHEL in its core, so it might get your installation going! https://access.redhat.com/site/articles/118133


0

Greetings from Adaptec by PMC! All the controllers you mentioned do store the physical device configuration in the NVSRAM on the controller. The post message should give some indication of the configuration change i.e.: Drive CN0 port 0 is no longer present or similar. If you have knowingly made a change to the physical drives attached it should be safe ...


0

Well if your backups are not current you could try a forced reassembly in degraded mode using three drives... mdadm -v --assemble --force /dev/md0 /dev/sdb1 /dev/sdc1 /dev/sde1 And as sde1 is only slightly out of sync wrt Update Time and Event count I suspect you will be able to access most of your data. I have done this many times successfully in similar ...


0

http://nex7.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/readme1st.html Scroll down to #12. The problem with hot spares is that you could be removing single points of failure. For instance, if you have mirrors, each with a drive in two different JBOD's, and you lose a drive in JBOD A and Solaris/Omni/Etc chooses to use a hotspare from JBOD A, you now have a single point of ...


1

I would suggest using the same order as the other arrays because they most likely were created under the identical conditions as the array in question. Remember to always "--assume-clean" on any assemble or create - you probably know this well enough but worth re-mentioning. Ideally you should actually be working off of images (dd) of the original drives ...


1

You are indeed correct. The server lost one if it's drives (probably /dev/sdb). You have in total 3 raid devices /dev/md0, /dev/md1, /dev/md2 (i suppose those are for /, /boot and swap) You need to do the following: verify that the disk has indeed failed dmesg can help (and confuse you). Ask the provider to physically change the failed drive After that ...



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