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1

If as per your comment the error happens all the time on the same sector than it is a disk problem, for some reason the disk times out on writing there (based on the smart error log) and either it can't reallocate it or for some unknown reasons it decides not to reallocate. In a SAS disk you could use an explicit command to reallocate the sector, I'm not ...


0

Zoredache is right on the money with his comment, which probably should have been the answer. The RAID controller and file system will already align things in a manner that won't cause any problems. There is still room for tweaking things for performance (RAID stripe size and NTFS sector size), but making changes there don't usually have a noticeable impact ...


2

If you fast-initialized, but the RAID5 is still configured in the same manner as before, then you may have only deleted the partition table. This can be repaired, but might take a great deal of expertise to accomplish. If this were a volume with an NTFS file system, there would be more options available. But in your current situation, you may be stuck with ...


0

I talked to a SuperMicro tech who said you need a 3rd party raid card. I know this because I have the exact same board, with the same problem.


0

The bitmap is small by default; a few hundred kilobytes. You can scale it using --bitmap-chunks though (see mdadm(8)). You can't place the external bitmap file on the RAID array itself. You should be able to assemble a RAID array that has an external bitmap without the bitmap, but as far as I can tell there is no way to re-attach it afterwards. This isn't ...


0

The issue was that the drives weren't getting power. Whilst the drive caddies were fully inserted and clicked into place, they weren't providing the drives with power. I tested by taking the drive out of the caddy and inserting it without a caddy into the bay. It powered on with no problems and was detected almost immediately. I've made some dodgy ...


0

You don't usually put swap on your SSD because of the huge number of I/O operations in case the OS needs swapping. In my NAS, I have a RAID 1 partition for swap in my HDDs. In case you need to use swap, a 4-members RAID1 will work pretty fast. However, allocating swap in a 16gb memory system is unuseful, you'll probably never need that. You might allocate 8 ...


0

On server increasing RPCNFSDCOUNT number in /etc/default/nfs-kernel-server may help; on client(s) it may be worth trying smaller rsize and wsize values...


0

After ignoring the "Drive 3:blahblah" I removed the Drive in Bay 1 that showed status as "roaming" and booted. Since the Mac still booted I was sure that drive was the issue. I put a new drive in and selected it in RAID utility - Selected "RAID" from the Mac top menu and clicked "mark as spare" and assigned it to my RAID set. RAID rebuild like a champ!


1

The 12-slot model of this server has a SAS expander installed on the drive backplane. Gen8 ProLiant servers require a healthy FBWC cache module installed in the RAID controller in order to interface with an expander backplane. Your supplier messed up. Despite this, you'd want the FBWC for performance reasons. My recommendation is to get a P420 ...


0

Well the B320i only supports 8 disks/disk slots - have you added an additional disk cage or put this card in one of the 25-slot models? also I didn't think you could get a B320i without at least 512MB of FBWC - have you removed it?


0

Looks like that controller is getting old, do you know what version the firmware is? I couldn't find any docs for it on the LSI site. I don't know if it's applicable but I did find this similar problem on IBM site: http://www-947.ibm.com/support/entry/portal/docdisplay?lndocid=migr-5075096 Update the LSI SAS Controller BIOS and firmware package to version ...


0

Various products offer storage tiering for various types of storage in the same platform, everything from FAST VP on EMC VNX SAN to tiering in systems like ZFS and Storage Spaces. If you're looking for something to bridge storage at multiple sites, or mix cloud and local/LAN storage, then it sounds like you might be served by a cloud storage gateway. ...


0

A separate server in a separate facility is the only way to be sure everything's gonna be all right even if one of your data centers burns down. The wording in your question makes me remind you that real-time data mirroring does NOT equal to backups. Removing a wrong directory or committing a wrong SQL query gets mirrored in real-time to your another ...


1

Michaelmore, If the new drive is SATA 3.0 7200RPM then it should work. However if your goal is to configure Raid 1 then please plan on backing up your data before doing so (especially if this is an Production environment). I'm not sure how picky the controller is but there is always that risk of compatibility with a drive that is not "officially" supported ...


0

The raid controller message “single bit error detected” is just informational. It is not a hardware error neither a proper warning to contact the manufacturer to request a fix. Most publicly available memory (RAM) do suffer errors at random (excluding military hardware). In a computing environment which this is unacceptable, a solution is provided: ECC. I ...


1

I had the same problem and I solved it by means of a little Linux FUSE program I wrote. It's named xraid and I put it on Sourceforge. For assembling your RAID: Download and compile xraid Run it: mkdir mnt ./xraid mnt 512 /dev/sdb /dev/sdc You now should be able to access your RAID under mnt/xraid.


0

That card has a Marvell 88SE9230 chipset. I don't know which driver gets loaded in your kernel but you may be lucky and have compatibility with the Marvell support in smartctl. Then you can script something based around smartctl -a -d marvell /dev/sda to monitor drive status in your array.


1

This is a consumer oriented adapter card, and should not be used in professional systems. I doubt there is any monitoring solution available for this. I recommend that you get a proper server RAID adapter, or use Linux software RAID instead.


0

If you removed the new disk, you will interrupt the raid rebuild process. Why would you do that? If you want to lower the speed of raid rebuild, you can play with this variable: /proc/sys/dev/raid/speed_limit_max


2

Lots of similar questions in a short period... Ubuntu isn't well-suited to vendor-specific hardware support (probably the vendors' fault, but it is what it is). The HP ProLiant N54L server you have has binary drivers for the storage array that are only available for Windows and Red Hat. See: Cant find my harddrives in ubuntu installation? The RAID ...


1

The best way is to restore the latest backup. Otherwise, one can try tools mentioned in Ubuntu's Data recovery article. To be safe, you should create an image of the current state of the RAID volume, and operate on the image.


0

[Yes, I know I'm responding to a nearly five-year-old post; but I can't bear to let the misinformation posted by "XTZ" stand.] Sorry, "XTZ", but Martijn Heemels has it exactly right: "Software RAID" and "fakeRAID" are two ENTIRELY different things. Further, I can confirm from first-hand experience that you can indeed migrate a (properly implemented -- ...


-1

As mentioned previously, versions 10 and higher include an e-mail on failure function. I just downloaded and installed version 13.x and it solved my issue with red lights on the slave drives.


4

If you have a RAID array that has three failing drives, there is low probability of getting the raidset back into service. Sorry. I'm afriad to say your only alternative is to replace the failing disks, recreate the raidset, and then restore the information from your most recent backup set. You realize the btrfs is still relatively experimental and thus ...


2

The MegaCLI tool is able to communicate with the controller and retrieve such information.


1

An interesting side-node, check out scsi 2:0:0:0 and 2:0:1:0 there, those seem to be the component disks of the RAID? Odd that they're exposed directly. But, anyway, scsi 2:1:0:0 pops up after, which is the RAID disk. It is finding the partitions on the correct ID, scsi 2:1:0:0, so all is well - the problem is that the disk is ready at 38 seconds, and the ...


0

Your iometer results look to be consistent with what you were expecting. I think that the testing tool/protocol was the issue here, and that there's nothing wrong with your array. Be sure to use FastPath, though, as it really does improve SSD array performance...


1

I have seen something similar myself, although it was a few years ago. In my case it was problem memory and when copying data, there was some form of caching going on which I suspected was slowly using memory until it got to the problem memory and... boom! crashed computer. A memory test should identify this easily enough, or perhaps removing some memory ...


0

Your card isn't able to send data fast enough to saturate the drives. That said, while SSD are fast all around, they're screaming fast on random seek reads. Try running a benchmark using small block random reads and measure the number of IO/s you can get.


3

Ready for Rebuild is a bad status if you're using a parity RAID level, like 5 or 6. It means that you likely have read errors on another drive in the array... e.g. another failing drive. If the system is still online your best option is to recover data or rebuild. There's no good fix for this, and definitely not much you can do to debug. See the following: ...


1

Dell PERC daughtercards have a tendency to wiggle their way slightly out of their socket, usually as a result of careful handling by the shipping company. ;-) Many on-boot RAID controller problems on Dells can be resolved by simply removing the daughtercard and then reseating it. Note the blue circles on the card, those are the places where you should ...


0

more /proc/scsi/scsi This may work on your system. It appears to work for Red Hat 5.5 on some hardware (not all). Shows the RAID level and size of logical drive.


1

This is potentially a little weird; but consider powering off and removing/reseating the hardware key for the RAID. I don't specifically know for your model; but many Dell's have a tiny little daughter card for this purpose.


2

There is no added value of creating a partition table there, unless you want to subdivide the amount of space further. If you need to subdivide the space further you would possibly benefit most from using the logical volume manager instead of creating partitions and then you can still skip the creation of a partition table and address the whole RAID 6 ...


4

Arguments against the partitioning: Partitions are strict, obsolete things in the today. A repartitioning mostly a problematic thing. You won't be able to change things in the future. Raid devices are directly partitionable only in newer kernels. Thus I suggest you to simply use the whole disk directly, if you won't use some advanced solution. On Linux, ...


1

Yes and no... Think about this: Your disks will not perform at 6Gbps (unless they're SSDs). So some level of oversubscription is okay when you go to using a SAS expander. A more common scenario is the use of an external JBOD storage enclosure. Those usually have 1 or 2 x 4-lane SAS connectors linking them to the main server. Let's assume 4 x 6Gbps, so ...


0

The answers in this post have grown dated. Although more recent, my answer is a summary from barely skimming the surface of this topic. Hopefully it will jumpstart updates to the thread and I have marked it Community Wiki in hopes that it evolves to better content. XCP -> XenServer As I have dug into this, I am increasingly finding that what was XCP has ...


1

Typically hot swap hard disk brackets are intended for incidental maintenance purposes and not for daily use. My recommendation would be to use external USB drives. That gives you the benefit of some extra protection for the disks as well as a connector that is designed for repeated unplugging and insertions. In addition it isn't dependant on "exotic" ...


2

Since the "Windows" part is not a requirement , i dare to suggest using ZFS. IT wil run on Linux (even if performances are not stellar ... yet) or FreeBSD or IllumOS I have a very similar workflow i use for my raw photos at home, I do it with USB3 sticks but the idea is the same 1)Create a mirrored zpool #sudo zpool status zmirrusb pool: zmirrusb ...


2

Raid1 is just a mirrored disk, so if you enable raid1 and have your 1st disk as primary and the 2nd as the mirror, no you wont loose any data. Did this yesterday on a dl320 and it was fine


3

One of the best way to recover damaged partition is to run software such as TestDisk and/or PhotoRec on your device. It won't succeed for sure, so be cautious. But, most of the time it got me out of a lot of troubles. Here are full tutorials about using TestDisk and recover your partitions: TestDisk Step By Step. How to recover partitions and data using ...


4

Do not attempt to mount directly the device ! You need to mount a partition of it. For example, this is wrong when you do: mount /dev/sda /mnt What you should do is: mount /dev/sda3 /mnt The system need the meta-data enclosed in the partition to know what to do with it. If you mount directly the device, these meta-data are missing and the mount will ...


1

Depending on the OS you're running, you could sacrifice the hardware RAID and mount the drives individually in the OS. I know Windows Server 2008 R2 and later (and I think Windows 8) support RAID 5. Of course, you couldn't boot to it, but Trim would work thus your performance would be consistent.


4

This is a bad idea... Sometimes it makes sense to use ZFS with hardware RAID, or a combination of ZFS and hardware RAID. This is one of those cases. The main issue you'll encounter doing this the way you're planning is that each single disk will be its own VDISK and have its own MSA RAID metadata. The failure of a disk means that the VDISK is completely ...



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