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The on-disk RAID format of HP Smart Array controllers and disk sets are the same between the P410 and P420 controller. The bigger questions are: What server model and generation are you using? The P410 controller is linked to G6 and G7 ProLiant servers, while the Gen8 servers use the P420 controller. Why do you want to change the controller? Are you ...


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From the P420 QuickSpecs: Data Compatibility among most current shipping Smart Array controllers allows simple and easy upgrades any time needs for higher performance, capacity, and availability increase. Even successive generations of Smart Array controllers understand the data format of other Smart Array Controllers. So it would appear that ...


-1

The minimum number of drives required for RAID 6 is four. Technically there's no reason why you couldn't set up a RAID 6 array with only three disks, but most RAID controllers don't support this. (See Why does RAID 6 require at least 4 disks?) In a RAID 6 array with four disks, data blocks will be distributed across the drives, with two disks being used to ...


1

Any chance these are dual-channel SAS drives with both channels plugged into the same controller? Bit of a long shot, but that might explain why the drives are seen twice. The drives hold config on 3Ware controllers, so if I am right above, the controller may be seeing the same config twice, then wondering why it can only write to one 'set' of disks. On ...


0

Stripe width of the filesystem is just a parameter used to optimise the pattern of writes. You can change it on an existing partition and it will be used when writing new data. However a RAID5 with 3TB drives isn't very safe, you should think about using RAID6 at least.


2

3Ware controllers are nice - no doubt about that. But as noted above, RAID 5 with many disks is a real problem. If the disks are completely dead and gone, I would say you have no way of recovering, short of using a data recovery tool like this: https://www.runtime.org/raid.htm I have tried recovering data for customers (long time ago) and it is at best ...


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Did they fail on the exact same time ? What do you mean by "disks died" ? Are they mechanically termianted or only have some corruption on them ? Anyway, you have a double disk failure on RAID 5. This means your data is gone. The array cannot be rebuilt. At that many disks it was logical to have a RAID6 so it would protect against 2 disk failures in the ...


0

That price does seem a little off, I know that a 100GB MLC SSD for 13th generation PowerEdge has a $400 MSRP, though "appalled" is a bit of a strong reaction. Keep in mind, you're always going to see higher pricing for a vendor's "certified" enterprise drives. Although you can usually get the exact same model drive online for less than half the cost, there ...


0

I think that this is a good idea because it is "as simple as possible". The only drawback (that is not as important as reliability that you've described as top priority) I see is the final performance that would be almost equal to performance of the slower drive (in each particular situation there can be different one).


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Probably not. There's a bigger difference between SSD manufacturers than there is among makers of traditional hard drives, which results in different drivers and different optimal settings for different SSDs. A RAID 1 array with SSDs from different manufacturers would probably suffer from performance issues, and I'd expect it to have more ...


0

The cause for this problem was a faulty hdd. It did failed yesterday. I did remove the faulty hdd and waited till the raid was rebuilded. The server did boot correct this morning. How can I detect the health state of hp raid disks?


0

losetup works just fine on device files. At least on Ubuntu 14.04. Linux 3.13.0-43-generic with util-linux 2.20.1-5.1ubuntu20. And with 2.26-rc1 from git. sudo losetup -o 32256 /dev/loop5 /dev/sdb3 sudo tail -c 32257 /dev/sdb3 | sudo cmp - /dev/loop5 (for some reason, process substitution doesn't work: sudo cmp <(sudo tail -c 32257 /dev/sdb3) ...


2

It depends on what you're doing... The HP ProLiant DL180 G6 is an end-of-lifed server. It's way out of production. You don't have any options to upgrade this hardware to 12Gbps. It will be stuck at 6Gbps with a 24+1 port expander fed to two 4-lane 6Gbps SFF-8087 ports. I'm assuming you'll be using an HP Smart Array P410 controller... Most of the drives in ...


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I needed to reference the volume as /dev/md127 in fstab.


1

[5 years later] I have the same 3ware card. This past month, I've had a drive not come online a few times. This causes the normal need to remove/rebuild (logically, not physically) the RAID5 array. However.. ..twice in the last year, the troublesome drive comes online thinking IT is the RAID5 array and everyone else is missing-- split brain. Delete the ...


2

The problem looks to me very much down to this unrecovered read error on sda. That's the only currently-live half of the mirror, so if it can't be read, there's no way to cleanly made sdb6 a copy of sda6 and resync the mirror. I note it's been nearly 10,000 hours since sda last passed a selftest, so the idea that hardware failure might've crept up on it, ...


0

You will lose a bit of diskspace efficiency in this situation. Consider the following scenario. You have a .txt file saved to the drive. It parks in a 512Byte block size and is only 200Byts. It takes up the entire spot. Smaller block sized lend to more efficient use of space and larger block sizes tend to have a higher level of performance. You can ...


-1

If you have a UPS you can force the cache on and not use the batter on the raid. If you lose power without a raid card you can get corrupted data, thats what backups are for. And just because you lost power does not mean your system is toast. The cache only holds 256 megs and it gets flushed/written to HD all the time when idle. Its not like it holds ...


2

To answer your questions: RAID5 is not advisable, period. A single bad read during a rebuild kills your entire array. This is more of an issue with HDDs than SSDs, but it's still a consideration. RAID10 is generally the best option, but RAID6 (dual-parity) can also do quite well. You're comparing Jaguars to Hyundais, there. SSDs have better random access, ...


2

You can't. See where it says FAILED? That means your data is gone. RAID 5 can only sustain one failed drive, and generally speaking, is evil and to be avoided as if it were radioactive. Remember kids, only people who hate their data use RAID 5.


0

HP servers get updated from time to time and it is important to state the generation of the server. With that information, you could lookup whether the server is certified for the upstream product from Red Hat. Also with the server type you could find out, what raid controller is used and what driver might be needed. As far as I remember, there are ...


0

Even though I have accepted @ewwhite's answer above, I wanted to come back and report on a slightly conflicting answer that I just discovered elsewhere on the web, that is based on empirical data: Our results from the testing showed a 16% increase in reads while utilizing (2) SSDs in a RAID 0, with a 2% decrease in write performance. The performance ...


0

You didn't understand the man page. E25:S02 - its like variable which should have int values. All you need: 1.Get adapter ID (it's 0 in my example): root@sto# megacli Adpallinfo -aall | grep '^Adapter' Adapter #0 2. Get E and S values: megacli -PDlist -aall | grep -e '^Enclosure Device ID:' -e '^Slot ...


0

Get the Perc 310 controller at the very least. The onboard is effective, but less than ideal, I've had trouble with that configuration often. The 310 uses the system processor to perform. The best choice from the factory is to get the 710, which uses it own processor and operates completely independent from the system processor. Beefy and fast, a good ...


2

Sounds like you're using software assisted RAID (aka "FakeRAID") and don't have the proper (driver) support for it in ESXi. Head to VMWare's site and use the VMWare Compatibility Guide to determine if your version of ESXi is compatible with your RAID controller. Here's a similar question from ServerFault, in which the accepted answer notes tha thte RAID ...


0

I think you may have the RAID setup wrong. What you trying to do with Raid as 0+1 is a stripe and a mirror so minimum of four drives are needed, RAID 0 is striped and only requires two drives and RAID 1 is mirrored and only requires two drives. If you try to set RAID 0+1 on two drives it has probably failed and so you can see each drive. If RAID is ...


5

For that many disks there's really only two options but your mention of performance narrows that to one. RAID 6 would be the choice for getting the most capacity out of that many disks safely. RAID 10 would the choice for getting the most performance out of that many disks safely. It's as simple as that.


0

Chances are that you have HW RAID enabled in mode 0 or 1 and the controller is presenting one unified disk to FreeBSD. You either have to configure your controller for JBOD or if that's not supported then set up a RAID 0 array for each disk in your system.


1

Impossible to say what happened during your install without more info which at this point is probably not available. In theory, even if your HW RAID was enabled and therefore the OS only saw 1 physical disk, you should still be able to put ZFS on that, though it would be a bad idea. It's always better to disable the hardware RAID when using ZFS. You should ...


1

I prefer software RAID to hardware RAID on single servers, because hardware RAID forces the admin to take precautions against hardware failure of the RAID controller. This usually requires stocking and regularly testing spare RAID controllers. In your setup, though, I assume, that redundancy is on the node level, not on the disk level. If a node fails for ...


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Source: IBM tip H206526 Prevent the message from appearing in the system event logs: Open MegaRAID Storage Manager. Select Tools --> Monitor Configure Alerts. Select Change Individual Events. Highlight event ID 406. Deselect the System log check box.


2

LSI claim that their approach to RAID 10 differs from the standard definition because they follow the SNIA specification. With MegaRAID RAID 1 can consist of from two drives (the more traditional definition) to up to sixteen drives. MegaRAID RAID 1 must be an even number of drives. With MegaRAID 1, if more than two drives are in the Virtual Drive ...


-1

A MegaRAID RAID 10 is a RAID 10 as everywhere else: A RAID 0 (span) on top of RAID 1 arrays. The problem in your case is that MegaRAID will only allow you to span 8 RAID 1 arrays, whereas the RAID 1 arrays have to consist of 2 harddisks each. Therefore you will only be able to use 16 disks in your RAID 10.


0

You need to partition /dev/sdb to have a similar partition table to /dev/sda, then you need to insert the relevant partitions into the relevant arrays (mdadm -a /dev/md1 /dev/sdb1 ; mdadm -a /dev/md2 /dev/sdb3). I'm not entirely sure what /dev/sdb2 is for; it seems that swap is unRAIDed. In that case you might want to consider adding /dev/sdb2 as a second ...


3

Don't focus on the wrong thing! You're safe to replace the disk without a backup... Hardware RAID 1 (2 disks) with a hot-spare (1 disk) means that the spare would have rebuilt from the healthy disk, bringing the array back into good health. You can pull the failed disk and replace it with a new drive. It will rebuild and the spare will go back to hot-spare ...


1

I have hit his problem as well and after some testing can grow a Software RAID 0 array. I found an option which if you think about it makes sense to include in the grow command, the option is, --backup-file. If you think about it to realistically grow a RAID 0 array as you would if you did it in hardware is you'd need to copy the data elsewhere to destroy ...


2

You have to be careful with disks larger than 2TB on older controllers. There's no way to see the full capacity of 3TB, 4TB and 6TB disks on the Perc 6/i RAID controller, and Dell does not offer a firmware upgrade that would enable that functionality. Unfortunately, the chart from HGST is incorrect. The root issue is that the chipset on the 6i controller ...


0

What operating system are you using? Are there any warning lights on the exterior of the server chassis. Post the errors you received. The actual text, please. Contact the vendor you purchased from. Call HP for support. I suspect cache module failure, but this machine has so many built-in health checks that you should not be in the dark about what's ...


0

As per http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/servers/f/906/t/19412446 the perc 6 only supports 2TB physical drives


0

As it news, I would call for the board warrenty. The cache error can be seen as its usually the battery pack, you might not have it, but the other error you facing is not normal.


-2

This all happened by trying to install Ubuntu 14.10, instead I tried 12.04 and it worked first time! Must have something conflicting in 14.10 with this server. SOLVED! Thanks to everyone for trying to help


1

Try here: http://h30499.www3.hp.com/t5/ProLiant-Servers-ML-DL-SL/Problems-booting-up-G5-servers-after-firmware-upgrades/td-p/6210531#.VK_k9nuUJSA Specifically: This turned out to be a misterious Grub2 issue that was triggered by the storage array firmware upgrade. The moment we replaced Grub2 with Extlinux on affected servers, booting problems ...


2

Check your BIOS / EFI boot settings. I would suggest switching your motherboard into BIOS boot mode and disabling EFI boot to see if you can get it to install and boot. While the installation CD may be compatible with both EFI and BIOS, your RAID controller may not be. Ubuntu doesn't assign drive letters such as "C" and would never print anything to ...


7

This is not true. The DL360 G7 server uses an HP Smart Array P410 controller. This uses the standard CCISS or HPSA drivers that have been in the Linux kernel for ages. You won't need anything special in order to install Ubuntu on this platform. Be sure to create a Logical Drive in the BIOS RAID utility first, though. Otherwise, your Ubuntu installation ...


0

Dell openmanage, if you use dell server ofcourse. You can even install it over esx. A openmanage login allow a direct access to the whole server, but as i read your statement they do all hardware maintenance. Edited: hp got a software like that, but i didnt tested it much. So, it depend on your server brand if you no longer can do it via the controller ...


1

Is /etc/inittab the only file missing or does it look like other parts of / are affected? If only inittab is missing, try googling for it and rebuilding one, or install a VM with this version of the OS to get a fresh copy, or restore from backup if available. Also, check /lost+found: inittab may have been recovered by fsck.


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Found a way to do it using the "show all" command on a shell loop: # while [ 1 ] ;do tw_cli /c7/p0 show all; done This creates sufficient access to the individual drive (p0) to blink the light on the drive bay.


1

It sounds like you want a RAID10 with two mirrors on your three disks. Perfectly normal setup with Linux software RAID. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_MD_RAID_10#Linux_MD_RAID_10 It does exactly what you described. You decide how many copies (mirrors) of each data block you want, and it will stripe the data to fill all the disks. For example, if I ...


-1

No, raid 1 requires an even number of disks. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_RAID_levels#RAID_1


0

The battery attached to the RAID controller's cache module allows the write cache (array accelerator) to work. Without the battery, the array accelerator is disabled. The ML350 G6 server was sold from 2009-2012, and HP RAID batteries last 3-5 years. So your old battery may have died. Just replace it with a new battery and you should be fine.



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