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9

On modern hardware RAID controllers, RAID metadata is written to the disks, so they are somewhat portable, with restrictions on drive ordering; they have to be moved together. However, this is the wrong way to handle backups. Intentionally failing (groups of) disks and forcing a degraded array is fraught and a bad approach to accomplishing offsite backup. ...


7

First of all: to those, who still believes in "RAID0 has no hot spare". It could have a manual spare, done by human, who understand RAID levels and mdadm. mdadm is software RAID, so it could do a lot of interesting things. Credits to Zoredache for the idea! So, the situation: you have RAID0 array of two disks you would like to replace one of them without ...


2

It looks like that is a custom build server. I presume the perc 6/i is on the motherboard. Assuming you have an appropriate pci-e slot available, I would just add a SATA controller HBA (one which can operate in IT mode, not a "Raid" one), and connect it to the backplane. I like LSI controllers and have been using the 9207-8i - I'm doing SAS (however they ...


2

The problem is that with the first command you create a new logical drive - when finished you will have two LDs, each containing one disk. What you need to do instead is add the unassigned disk to the original RAID0 LD and then invoke the modify command. In other words: ctrl slot=0 ld=1 add drives=allunassigned And then: ctrl slot=0 ld=1 modify raid=1 ...


2

So you have a redundant array of disks that started to die. And you want to migrate it to the raid level where the death of a single disk will be fatal for data. My opinion - it's some sort of complicated suicide.


1

I had the same problem and I solved it by means of a little Linux FUSE program I wrote. It's named xraid and I put it on Sourceforge. For assembling your RAID: Download and compile xraid Run it: mkdir mnt ./xraid mnt 512 /dev/sdb /dev/sdc You now should be able to access your RAID under mnt/xraid.


1

Based on the further info and the fact that the raid controller doesn't have a battery installed I suggest you take a completely different path. The controller you have - B120i - is not a full hardware RAID, it's more like a hardware assisted software RAID. There is very little advantage in using these "FakeRAID" cards over pure software RAIDs. It's not any ...


1

According to the kernel.org RAID wiki: After the new disk was partitioned, the RAID level 1/4/5/6 array can be grown that is, RAID-0 is not eligible for growing. You will need to backup all the data, recreate the array from scratch, and restore from backups.


1

I couldn't find a way to make the server itself tell the Windows installer how to see the disk, but by talking to @joeqwerty in the comments I ended up following this course, which worked: Download the latest drivers from Dell: I did that from my product's support page, going on "Drivers & Downloads", category "Driver for OS Deployment". There was one ...


1

As far as I know once you set up a RAID0 you cannot change one of the disks. You can take a backup and switch the disks and restore the backup. I would just RAID5 those 3 disks you have. That way in the future you can drop a disk and still rebuild it.


1

RAID 0 does not provide redundancy. So it does not support hot drive replacement.


1

You appear to have had a drive failure. Is it possible to recovery data from this raid? No. At least not with the tools you have available. RAID 0 has ZERO redundancy and ZERO protection for your data in the event of a disk failure (or someone inadvertently pulling a drive out while the system is running). As others have said, replace the drive, ...



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