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This seems long - I have 12x 750GB on a 5805Z (BBU), RAID 6, home server. When I lost one drive, it took ~4 hours to rebuild. During that rebuild, another drive died (that's why I would NEVER use RAID 5 - disks always fail under heavy load - like a rebuild / OCE). That one also took about 4 hours. I replaced the 4 750's with 3TB drives, and created a 2nd ...


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You have answered the question yourself. If you have a UPS you can leave them on, if you don't then they should be off or else you risk data loss. On most servers in the datacenter they will generally be using OEM firmware that uses the cache in a read only mode. (The equivalent of off) Writes will be cached by the RAID card with battery backed memory.


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The P400 is not supported in ESXi 6.0 and so you won't have health status from the Controller.


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There are a lots of tools out there which will help you monitor your HDDs status and predict when they will fail or are they already failed in order to replace them as quick as possible. Since you're not mention what OS you're running on the server, I cannot help you with more specific suggestions.


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There should be tools available to query your RAID controller and determine the SMART status of the drives in the array. Not knowing the particular device you've got, I don't have any suggestions as to what to use. Once you know what to use (and how to use it), you'll need to automate the monitoring, so it will proactively notify you when there is a ...


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If you're using a hardware RAID controller, HDD-B will almost certainly be recognized as a "foreign" drive if you're using enterprise class hardware (which should be fair to assume according to the proper scope of SF questions). Hardware RAID controllers write unique identifying data to distinguish between drives from other controllers. Even if you were able ...


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You maybe need to reinitialize the drive (delete the metadata of the former Raid group) on HDD-B. Afterwards the controller (or md) does not care, what was written on the disks and will consider this it as empty.


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You can do this, but I'd recommend finding a like-model disk rather than using the larger 146GB 2.5" drive. If you have no other options (especially since 72GB disks are no longer manufactured), the 146GB disk will work and rebuild. The size of the disks and the vintage of the server indicate that this is an older G5 system (2005-2008), so at some point, ...


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Can I replace the failed drive with a 150GB hard disk, by unplugging the failed drive while the system is running, and hotplugging the bigger 150GB hard disk? Yes, the array will begin to rebuild using the new disk. Is there any risk of system failure? No more than when replacing the disk with one of the same size.



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