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If you're using a hardware RAID controller, HDD-B will almost certainly be recognized as a "foreign" drive if you're using enterprise class hardware (which should be fair to assume according to the proper scope of SF questions). Hardware RAID controllers write unique identifying data to distinguish between drives from other controllers. Even if you were able ...


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You maybe need to reinitialize the drive (delete the metadata of the former Raid group) on HDD-B. Afterwards the controller (or md) does not care, what was written on the disks and will consider this it as empty.


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You can do this, but I'd recommend finding a like-model disk rather than using the larger 146GB 2.5" drive. If you have no other options (especially since 72GB disks are no longer manufactured), the 146GB disk will work and rebuild. The size of the disks and the vintage of the server indicate that this is an older G5 system (2005-2008), so at some point, ...


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Can I replace the failed drive with a 150GB hard disk, by unplugging the failed drive while the system is running, and hotplugging the bigger 150GB hard disk? Yes, the array will begin to rebuild using the new disk. Is there any risk of system failure? No more than when replacing the disk with one of the same size.


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Either you should go RAID1 now and then re-make the whole thing later or go RAID6 or RAID10 (depending on what is possible - RAID10 gives better performance) With either of those options you have to have at least 4 drives in total. But don't use RAID5 with that large disks.. You will lose data one day if you do it.


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It helps if you know the configuration of the original RAID5. Perhaps you have saved the output of a prior run of mdadm --examine. There are some RAID recovery tools you can try like R-Studio / UFSexplorer / ReclaiMe I often work on failed mdadm RAID systems and can say recovery is almost always possible. But do not perform any action that writes to the ...


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If you got a corruption, that mean one of your hard drive ins't flagged defect, but it's, then you are out of luck without backup (and yes, such happen from time to time, updating raid adapter firmware help to prevent that) One thing that can happen, do you have a crypolocker virus running on a computer ? but usually he rename the file extension. If it's ...


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First off as EVERYONE will tell you: BACKUP!!!!! RAID isn't a backup. Either way... you probably mean the OS is raid 1 not 0. Raid 1 is mirror. Personally I wouldn't use raid 5. (I personally prefer raid 1 or raid 1+0 (raid 10)). Especially if your raid card isn't very good and doesn't have cache or even a battery cache backup attached. I use a good ...


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What does this exactly mean? As @Tigran Balyuan indicated, 'DISCONNECTED' is a vague term to inform you the NAS couldn't communicate with one of the drives. It could mean the drive failed, the SATA (or power) adapters are not seated properly or the controller that's reading the drive is bad. No way to tell unless you physically inspect the device, but in ...


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"Disconneted" is a vague term, you should probably consult synology documentation to find out what do they mean by this. It may actually mean that the drive was indeed disconnected (i.e. someone pulled it off by accident). In that case the drive itself should be ok, you can plug it back in and perform an array rebuild. Of course, "disconnected" could mean ...



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