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8

What I'm seeing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAR) says that RAR3-format files use AES for the encryption algorithm. It's unclear to me on first glance if the RAR3 file format is published or if there are open source implementations of the decryption / uncompression algorithm. If the format isn't published / or there aren't free implementations of the ...


4

I contacted RARLabs support and recieved a response. It turns out that RAR.EXE can handle streaming input similar to how gzip works. You just need to specify the -si option: -si[name] Read data from stdin (standard input), when creating an archive. Optional 'name' parameter allows to specify a file name of compressed stdin data in the ...


3

As you have stated there are password crackers/removers out there. I would not trust my files to a password protected archive files. I would suggest some type of file level encryption like GnuPG or AES Crypt


3

I think you'll want to use a case statement to choose how to unpack the input archive based on the filename (or perhaps use file to base it on the content instead). Unpack the input archive to a temporary directory, piping stdout/stdin to /dev/null or a file. Then run zip on the contents of the temporary directory, saving to a filename provided on the ...


3

I believe that tar uses the /tmp directory for intermediate files. You have a couple of options. One is to mount /tmp to a larger disk in your fstab. But that's a bit overkill. Instead, you can set the $TMPDIR environment variable. If present, tar will use that instead of /tmp.


2

Can you open other files on the offsite qnap? You might pick a smallish file, or set of files and run md5sum against them on each qnap to make sure the files are the same. (If the md5sums of both files are the same, the files are identical)


2

rar x archive.rar path/to/extract/to Worked.


1

On a single server, pigz is gzip compatible, which makes for trivial portability. It will use as many cores as you have, to compress file(s). I've found it quite useful, and significantly speeds up compression of a number of files. Usefully, pigz is installable directly from apt in Ubuntu 10.4. Something else at a higher level that I have just seen today ...


1

Giving Jodie the checkmark as s/he pointed me in the right direction, but it turns out that the issue is related to the fact that the two qnap devices belonged to different active directory domains, and someone had gone and turned on "advanced file permissions" on the local site. This meant that qnap was managing the ACLs itself, rather than letting Windows ...


1

Do you have unrar installed? It isn't part of the standard Centos Repos. Installation instructions are available online.


1

Most distributions exclude rar 3.0 support from ClamAV packages as the ClamAv authors had no legal right to include it. If you want rar support in ClamAV then you need to build it from the unmodified source which can be downloaded from the ClamAV website.



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