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10

I would say that the ratio is about right when things get done in a reasonable amount of time, where "reasonable" is defined by management. If you're the one managing the IT department there, you get to balance the budget for the department against the users who complain that things aren't getting done fast enough. If not, then someone else has apparently ...


7

The hours you'll spend per machine on support will have far less to do with the platform than the user so make a decision that is sensitive to the preferences and skills of your users and proceed.


5

There's probably no general answer. It depends on the environment that has to be maintained (Specialized servers? Fat or thin client? Special software that needs extra attention?), and on how much is outsourced (network infrastructure, sw installation, electrical wiring, helpdesk duties ...). To give some ideas: In my company, we have 3 IT people for a ...


4

3 admins to 1500 systems? I have some bad news for you. You are not supporting 1500 systems. Your users are supporting their systems. You are supporting the servers, network infrastructure, and helping them out a bit with their systems.


3

Depends also on the infrastructure you have to control things. If you have a Windows domain with 15 desktops and need to change a setting on all of them you'll have a much easier time than 15 separate Macs, likewise with AV configuration, password syncing and such. The same in reverse applies though so if you don't have a domain but do have a snow ...


2

You provided a lot of data, but I think still more would be needed to give some kind of estimate on that number. First of all, what kind of duplication is present in your system? In other words, do you have 4 sets of 500 things, each running exactly the same server config? Or do you have 200 different servers/services, and only 10 boxes running each thing. ...


2

Ratios don't really matter. You need adequate teams in place to handle different sets of tasks that complement each other. I define an adequate team as 3-4 individuals. You also need to establish career paths. I say ratios don't matter, because you can operate simple environments easily. I worked at a company with a 1,200 agent call center Example for a ...


2

Our overall IT staff is about 65 people supporting 450 internal users, 12,000 external users, 500 servers & network-based devices (not including printers), and 1000 desktops. Of the 65: 8 are 100% management (non-technical) 10 are leads who are roughly 2/3 supervisory/proj mgmt and 1/3 technical in their time-split. (technical plan-build & some ...


2

As a consultant I have seen a broad variety of ratios: Usually 1:40 or better for small and mid-sized companys seems to work out just fine (larger projects and non-IT related work gets done too). In bigger companies (and I consider 1500 systems "bigger") there is usually a smaller ratio because the it staff benefits from standardized hardware and ...


2

From lots of experience in supporting organizations that had roughly equal numbers of Unix-based and Windows-based end users, the tasks and category of the end user is more important than the platform in determining end user support requirements. Most of the end user support is typically "would you please reset my password," reconnecting loose cables, and ...


1

At my company it's just me and I'm only a software developer with about 30 people total. It's been quite an experience to walk into being the domain admin aside from being a developer. I walked into a fully setup network and we do alot of 3rd party hosting for software and our website so alot of that brunt work is shouldered by others. We buy our machines ...


1

We have around 2,300 members of staff, of which 1,800 use PC's on a regular basis. We also support over 400 servers. We have 50 permenent members of staff in the "Operations" department who support the servers, desktops, data and voice links, databases etc. (of which 9 are managers or team leaders). Most of the major line-of-business application support is ...


1

I have seen 1:25 to 1:50 as the norm in the corporate world. For smaller companies - it tends towards the 1:25 ratio, and for larger companies towards 1:50. That includes all internal IT support staff (developers, managers, help desk, etc). It does NOT include people working on the revenue producing side (developers at software company).


1

In terms of "full-time equivalents" : All staff : 1,446 (split across 5 main offices, plus 30-40 other sites with some sort of regular staff presence. ) IT Dept : 46 (includes 4 vacant posts) Of the 46 IT staff, 27 are what I'd term "general ops", i.e. support desk 2nd/3rd line support for network/hardware stuff infrstracture stuff (backups, network ...


1

1:250 but I don't recommend it


1

Over here, about 40 employees; 1.5 FTE of those are IT staff. IT maintains about 40 servers and 50-60 workstations (some employees have more than one workstation .. software development house). My previous company (also a software development house) had 150-ish employees and 4-ish IT staff which maintained as many workstations and lots of servers.


1

Depends entirely on the applications involved, the tasks involved, the caliber and experience of the users, the caliber and experience of the IT staff, and a couple hundred other things. Hell, the ratio wouldn't even be the same in different departments in my own company, let alone someone else's company with zero indication of what they do...


1

I suspect you are understaffed because you're asking and you've got response time issues. It depends wildly on how you're counting IT people to users. Are you counting desktop support? Or just server administrators? 30 to 50 to 1 for all technology staff is pretty normal for what I've seen, but that includes DBAs, Support Desk, Networking, Network ...


1

For maintenance and troubleshooting-related tasks ONLY: 1 help desk flunky for every 100 users 1 server admin for every 50-100 servers 1 network admin for every 50-100 networking devices At least 1 spare admin for each of the above categories Telecom can be contracted unless you have a lot of work for it Adjust the numbers later, the help desk position ...


1

Yes, it's not an aphrodite to athena apples to oranges comparison. (mind the pun) What you're really asking is: Do Mac's have a lower Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) when compared to PC running Windows? There was a whitepaper a few years back that tried to do a comparison, although all links to it seem dead! (maybe someone elses search skills are better ...


1

There are a few factors which will influence the ratio: experience of the sysadmin on both systems: if the person is a skilled Mac user, he/she will spend much less time to resolve problems. variety of applications used on the machines how "computer-savvy" are the users? I have to support both PCs and Macs in my network. I can't say that Macs (users) ...



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