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16

I had this exact problem on a (tower) server just like you explain, and it was easy: smartctl will output the serial number of the drive Vendors sometimes ship their own specific tools, like hdparm, that will do the same. So output the serial of the bad drive, and then use a dentist's mirror and a flashlight to find the drive. On a rackmount you'll ...


15

ophcrack is a live cd that boots and brute-forces passwords on a windows machine. http://ophcrack.sourceforge.net/


15

Only data that's on that disk - which is unlikely to be of any use (you may conceivably be able to snag some small files that lived only on the still-functioning disk). RAID-0 has no consideration for recovery from a drive failure - its purpose is pure performance. Time to dust off the backups!


13

You can download the Remote Server Administration Tools for Windows 7. This will give you all the MMC snap-ins you'd normally find on the Server OSes. However, the machine you're running this from will likely have to either be a domain member or at least connected to the same network the domain is on in order to connect to your DC remotely.


12

How appropriate, that this should come on the heels of "Backup Appreciation Week" (or whatever it's called). The problem with trying to do anything yourself is that you're just increasing the amount of degradation on the drives whenever you're running them. Decide now if you're going to send it to the pros, and if so, just do it. Presumably if this data ...


12

ntpasswd will give you off-line access to the registry and allow you to reset or blank passwords, including the Administrator.


11

Do not attempt any recovery of a HDD while it's still in an enclosure. Cut that sucker out if you need to and plug it in directly via IDE or SATA. Best software for partition recovery http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk Best software for file recovery http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec I've succesfully used both several times a year with clients ...


11

You have just learned two very important lessons the hard way: RAID is not a backup (and RAID 0 is just a way to increase your chance of failure). If you value your data, MAKE REGULAR BACKUPS and perform frequent restore tests to be sure you can get the data back. At this point if the failed drive isn't even recognized by your system your options are ...


10

mkdir /var/run chmod 755 /var/run that will fix most things, anything that still doesn't work will just need to be restarted edit: restarted as in, /etc/init.d/ssh restart which will recreate /var/run/sshd. you may have some issues with the pid files being missing, nothing a manual pkill won't fix.


8

If you are worried you might do this in the future you could create an alias for the rm command and have it link to a script. This script would take the command line argument and move that file to ~/Recycle or whatever. You could then create a cron job to empty the trash every month or so.If you are interested in this let me know and I can post some code if ...


8

Microsoft has some recommendations for what to do if a read-only DC is stolen. I don't think they go far enough, though. I lean more toward the approach described here. The big enchilada IMHO is to make sure that you immediately force password changes for all domain accounts; that will go a long way towards reducing the impact.


8

Non-Home editions of Windows come with a command-line tool called cipher.exe. In addition to letting you encrypt files with NTFS encryption, it also has a free-space wiping mechanism. e.g. C:\> cipher /W:C:\ It will then wipe all free space on the designated drive. Other tools can do one-off file wipes, but I like cipher.exe because it is built-in on ...


8

Things you might be able to recover from the remaining disk: The file system header may be smaller than the stripe size of the RAID volume, so there is a chance it will reside on a single disk. Files smaller than the RAID stripe size may also reside on a single disk, but you may not be able to recover sufficient file system metadata to infer the ...


7

In general, I'd lean towards a reinstall (from the backups you are absolutely supposed to have). But I'm feeling hackish, so here's another way (assuming that your system is mounted under /target): Get a list of all the installed packages that have files in /bin: grep ^/bin/ /target/var/lib/dpkg/info/*.list | sed 's%^.*/\([^/\.]*\).list%\1%' ...


6

Spanned volumes, unlike striped volumes, do not stripe data across all disks. This means that all data is written to the first logical disk in the span until it is filled, then additional data is written to the next logical disk, and so on. This means that if a disk in a span fails, only the data that was written to that failed disk is gone. If you lost the ...


6

You can do it in SQL Managment Studio by right-clicking the database, choosing Properties, selecting Options in the menu on the left and changing the Recovery Model drop-down to Simple. In T-SQL the command is: ALTER DATABASE [MyDatabase] SET RECOVERY SIMPLE


6

There is no way to do this natively with Microsoft tools. You will need to purchase an OST to PST converter. OST's can only be opened on the machine they were created on, by the profile that created it. That is why there are so many companies selling these OST converters.


6

Edit: Woah there! You say you've lost your Active Directory. That changes things considerably. I would still look long and hard at restoring a System State Backup (if you've got one) because you'll get back your AD in the process (and won't have to rejoin all your client computers to the domain, deal with user profiles, etc). If you can't get AD back then ...


5

Your data is still there, but in a probably-corrupted state. Most of the time, the writes are interleaved between the drives. (but at what block size? who knows...) It is theoretically possible to simply rebuild the header (or footer) of the drives if that is all that got corrupted. The header could alternatively be copied off of a new array and placed ...


5

It seems to me that you've answered your own question. One reason for causing this huge load include a poorly configured Apache process on a virtual server... If you have a poorly configured Apache server, fix that configuration. You've already done the investigation, so now you should implement the proper fix. A script to interrupt/restart/kill ...


5

Usually you would have to hope that the connections are labeled in some fashion then work from the identity of the failed device. For example...and someone would have to comment to correct me...if you have two IDE channels, you have up to 2 drives on each, you could have sda, sdb, sdc, and sdd. If sdd failed it would be the second drive on the cable of the ...


5

If this was me, and you do not want a headache later... buy a second hard drive - 5400rpm's are around £30 for a cheap one or £50ish for a cheap 7200RPM and replace it with the one in the laptop. (edit - this assumes that the laptop is not running TPM / Bitlocker or anything where the machine is locked to using a single hard drive) This would be a easy swap ...


5

Why don't you just rebuild your server? Apart from as an "Emergency Get Out" I'd never trust restore modes etc on a Server Operating System.


5

Possible? Yes. Likely? No.


5

It's always nice to see a new serverfault user that's already got the right answer in mind :) Basically what you suggest is spot-on, there are some SCSI-to-USB devices out there (I think Adaptec did their own at one point) that may make it a bit more portable but essentially that's exactly the way to do it.


4

I would say that you are in a pretty bad shape. If you are simply desperate to somehow recover some of your data and don't care much about the LVM (whose metadata is probably already corrupt, judging by the IO errors from vgchange -an), I would recommend going low level. Remember, LVM is just a wrapper around the kernel device mapper, so you can use dmsetup ...


4

You're probably very, very screwed. If the data is really valuable, a forensic data recovery place can probably get most of it back, but it'll be incredibly expensive. This is why we always quarantine drives for (at least) 3 months between decommissioning the hardware and reusing the disks. Having a bunch of spare disks on hand is orders of magnitude ...


4

Ideally you would've done a dump with pg_dump, which would've made this much easier. Bad office people, no cookie. Because you have the binaries from the same release, you can save some hassle. Unzip your backup dir somewhere convenient where you have full read/write permission as your normal user account. I'll assume it's on your desktop: ...



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