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3

You can add your script in ~/.bash_profile where ~ represents the homedir of the user for which running the script is intended.


2

For me, the below command sequence has worked as expected. I have done modifications in /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules to change the eth number and to reload them without rebooting. /etc/init.d/networking stop /etc/init.d/udev stop udevadm control --reload-rules /etc/init.d/udev start /etc/init.d/networking start Following this, it ...


2

As per RHEL7/Centos7 there is no iptables service available in the default install. Instead they want you to use firewalld which is turned on by default. (see man firewall-cmd for more information on how to operate firewalld ) If you want to use iptables u need to install iptables-services and enable them with systemctl enable iptables. You will need to ...


2

Whyever this fails (my assumption would be lvresize ignoring the TERM signal), this a terrible approach, as lvresize's real task might take that long and you really don't want to kill it while it works. Instead, ask for confirmation separately (with timeout if need be) and then run lvresize uninterrupted.


1

ssh isn't allocating a tty. Add -t to the ssh command.


1

You will just need to add the public key contained in the pem file in the authorized_keys file for the user. The public key can be extract like this: openssl rsa -in charlie.pem -pubout > charlie.pub The public key can than be stored in the Ansible code under files. Than you can use the user module to create the user and the authorized_key module to ...


1

After partition resize, you should reboot the system to be 100% sure that kernel recognizes the new size. After that: you had to resize the LVM volume, issuing lvextend /dev/system/tmp -L 5G you had to resize the filesystem, issuing resize2fs /dev/system/tmp Please pay much attention to issuing the above command against the correct devices. For example, ...


1

Simply by moving the file away/deleting it and reinstalling appropriate package. $ rpm -qf /etc/ssh/sshd_config # to find out what package owns the file openssh-server $ mv /etc/ssh/sshd_config{,.old} # backup the modified version $ yum reinstall openssh-server # will create the file with default configuration


1

You can change the permissions for it in /etc/fstab with the mount option mode such as: none /dev/shm tmpfs defaults,size=8G,mode=777 0 0


1

rpmbuild adds Python requiremenst automatically from the version of python used. As such, it was adding python(abi)=2.7 to the requires list of the RPM. However, when using the python27 that scl was using provides python27-python. The issue was resolved by adding the line AutoReqProv: no to the spec file in the RPM. The machine that was having the rpm ...


1

Yes, all 8 will be installed in /boot I would recommend installing them in groups and once You boot from newer kernel move old one to archive as You might need it maybe in the future.


1

Snapshots on Netapp take space based on how many blocks have changed since they were created. That can get high with time. You can safely delete any snapshot that's not in a locked state (for things like snapmirror) and that will clear up space for you. You can also configure snap autodelete to prevent the snapshots from exceeding the reserve. Snap show ...


1

No, it is not possible: yum intentionally manages kernel updates as new installation, rather than true upgrades. If your /boot partition is full, you should first remove oldest kernels (but not the one currently running - you can find it issuing uname -a) using yum remove. After that, you can install the newer kernels.


1

The file you edited is the ssh client configuration. You want sshd_config.


1

The CentOS 7 anaconda "repo" command supports --install, which installs the repo information on the system being built: https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/7/html/Installation_Guide/sect-kickstart-syntax.html



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