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7

RHEL 7 includes Python 2.7 and has been out for a while already.


4

Not only is RHEL 7 supporting and shipping python 2.7, but from RHEL 6.4 and onwards python 2.7 is available through "Software collections". From Red Hat Software Collections 1.0 product documentation: With the notable exception of Node.js, all Red Hat Software Collections components are fully supported under Red Hat Enterprise Linux Subscription ...


2

You can grab the source code for 9.0.8, then install the module from source: tar xf postgresql-9.0.8.tar.gz cd postgresql-9.0.8/contrib/unaccent PATH=/usr/bin/pgsql-9.0/bin:$PATH make USE_PGXS=1 sudo PATH=/usr/bin/pgsql-9.0/bin:$PATH make USE_PGXS=1 install Of course this requires the correct headers to be present, in particular the postgresql-devel ...


2

As you mentioned in your comment, you can use multilib_policy=all for groupinstall, and use setarch command for yum-builddep like this: setarch i686 yum-builddep postgresql


2

Install the java versions you want, running applications should not be affected despite the default java version being changed. Then run the alternatives utility to pick your default java version: alternatives --config java alternatives --config javac Verify your setup with java -version javac -version If you're unsure, try this on a non-production ...


2

Of course. SSL certificates are not really related to the OS or OS version, at all. The OS doesn't need to "accept" the SSL certificate. You would simply configure your new server with the SSL certificate in the places you're using it (presumable in Apache for web service, possibly in other services, like SMTP in Postfix or Sendmail or POP3S and IMAPS in ...


1

Use sepolicy from the policycoreutils-devel package on your RedHat distribution. To achieve what you asked you will need to use the following: sepolicy generate --confined_admin -n NAME [-a ADMIN_DOMAIN] [-u USER] This will generate a policy which you can compile (make -f /usr/share/selinux/devel/Makefile) into a module that you can install with ...


1

I'd look at atop and psacct. Also, I have to ask if you really mean Red Hat 6.2 or RHEL 6.2.


1

I've never had this issue... but then again, I don't specify the block device in my kickstarts (which I run with Dell DRAC and HP ILO management). Have you tried not specifying /dev/sda? I'm assuming you have a RAID controller, so the resulting VD will be the likely install target, no? If there are other VD's that you wish to ignore, use the --ignoredisk ...


1

I do not know how to configure iptables on this machine to do as you want. I usually use in such case SSH tunneling. I find it easy to set-up (personal opinion here!) ;-) but ... you need to have an SSH connection on your localhost (it does not need to be accessible from remote!). The command syntax in this case is: ssh -f -C -N -L [<bind ...


1

mod_proxy_fcgi needs Apache 2.3 and later, which is why you get it packaged with Apache 2.4 and not with 2.2.


1

It's in the "RHEL Server Optional repository". You need to subscribe your machine to that repository via RHN.


1

Actually. i found out the answer in ubuntu systemd is not used by ubuntu at the moment ( at least not yet) you can install and use systemd if you want to, right now ubuntu now uses UFW ( iptables is not removed) UFW enables users to use iptables in a better way, easy to add rules. etc The init.d is still there with symbolic links to upstart to eg : ...


1

You are overriding VNCSERVERS variable. Doc in file says "The VNCSERVERS variable is a list of display:user pairs.". You should use this form instead: VNCSERVERS="2:abc 3:root" VNCSERVERARGS[2]="-geometry 800x600 -nolisten tcp -nohttpd -localhost" VNCSERVERARGS[3]="-geometry 800x600 -nolisten tcp -nohttpd -localhost"


1

Your free block count isn't very far off from the reserved count. Block count: 52428800 Reserved block count: 2619904 Free blocks: 5432592 At creation time the ext3 filesystem reserves a percentage of blocks for use by the root user, which is 5% by default. This allows root owned processes to continue writing to disk while ...


1

If you've installed the new server, the new clients are installed too - they're a dependency of the server. Redhat systems now use an "alternatives" mechanism similar to Debian. You'll find that /usr/bin/psql is a symlink pointing to /etc/alternatives/pgsql-psql which is in turn a symlink to the default psql. You can use the update-alternatives command to ...



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