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3

Shutdown is preferable because it allows you to specify the reason for the drastic action -- something you should always do. The message will be recorded in the log(s) for posterity. For example: shutdown -r now 'Kernel upgrade requires reboot' You can also perform a scheduled reboot -- by specifying something other than now as the reboot time: shutdown -...


3

If you take a look, in RHEL 7 both /sbin/shutdown and /sbin/reboot are actually just symlinks to systemd's systemctl command. So, use whatever you want. No functional difference as ewwhite told, not even in earlier RHEL releases which did not yet use systemd.


11

For Red Hat systems, there is no functional difference between reboot and shutdown -r now. Do whatever is easier for you.


1

It seems that you want the exit value from the remote script ( $?) and not stdout (the scripts output as per your title) The ssh man page says this ssh exits with the exit status of the remote command or with 255 if an error occurred. So if your script is working correctly it will return 100. If it's not then there are a few possibilities command ...


0

Actually i'm using tomcat 7.0.70 with jdk6 on a centos 6.8 I followed the update wrote by marplesoft about the presence on gitub of a specfile, here: https://github.com/bdwyertech/rpm-tomcat7 A small modification to the "version" field of specfile, to use tomcat 7.0.70, and then the installation went smootly. Actually tomcat is up, but there are no ...


3

/etc/environment doesn't perform variable expansion. Thus, your PATH is now literally {JAVA_HOME}/bin:{JRE_HOME}/bin:{M2}:{PATH}, which won't work of course. If you use bash only, you might want to look into setting $BASH_ENV in /etc/environment like so: BASH_ENV=/etc/non-inter-test where /etc/non-inter-test is then read and executed by non-interactive ...


0

To see a list of all "master alternative names": update-alternatives --get-selections --get-selections list master alternative names and their status. And for each of those listed, you can run --list $ALTERNATIVE_NAME, e.g. update-alternatives --list editor --list name Display all targets of the link group. If you would like to see a list of ...


0

I suggest to try the simple du command without any switches. You will eventually see which directory is slowing down the process. Might be a faulty disk, or some other reason, ...


1

ssh isn't allocating a tty. Add -t to the ssh command.


0

The reason your service is stopping is in the logging you provided: /bin/bash rtc_client.sh start (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS) Your rtc_client.sh script is exiting with a SUCCESS status. You should investigate your script to see why it doesn't keep running continually.


1

You will just need to add the public key contained in the pem file in the authorized_keys file for the user. The public key can be extract like this: openssl rsa -in charlie.pem -pubout > charlie.pub The public key can than be stored in the Ansible code under files. Than you can use the user module to create the user and the authorized_key module to ...


0

I resorted to python, It should work with any version of Python, I have only tested in on Linux however. For Windows you may have to reverse the "/". I have not tried this with evil file names - but with simple names. To use python dir_merge.py DIR1 DIR2 DIR3 Where DIR1 is a directory with files in, DIR2 also a directory with files in. DIR3 can already ...


0

I see. If these are virtio only, and not virtio-scsi devices, I can reproduce in a VM. I have opened a Bugzilla at https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1348664.


0

As it turned out, the problem lies in a different place. It seems that jailshell is the one to blaim, showing different access mask to different users for the same file. For that reason, I'm closing the question.


0

I follow below steps to configure workbench and other interactive jobs using qrsh. create file qlogin.sh #!/bin/sh HOST=$1 PORT=$2 if [ "x$DISPLAY" = "x" ]; then exec /usr/bin/ssh -p $PORT $HOST else exec /usr/bin/ssh -X -Y -p $PORT $HOST fi Now modify the configuration using qconf -mconf qlogin_command /opt/gridengine/bin/qlogin.sh ...


0

To answer no to any question add -qq option to a command. When using --force/--yes you should double check what is the script doing. +1 to Karen B's suggestion to use expect.


0

For your case, they do the same thing. lvresize can be used for both shrinking and/or extending while lvextend can only be used for extending. Second thing, I'm guessing your physical extend size (PE) of your volume group is set to 32M, which is the reason lveextend rounds it up from 1 to 32M. Before you think about resizing the PE value, I'm afraid it's ...


2

Whyever this fails (my assumption would be lvresize ignoring the TERM signal), this a terrible approach, as lvresize's real task might take that long and you really don't want to kill it while it works. Instead, ask for confirmation separately (with timeout if need be) and then run lvresize uninterrupted.


1

You can change the permissions for it in /etc/fstab with the mount option mode such as: none /dev/shm tmpfs defaults,size=8G,mode=777 0 0


0

Back up your data. List the transaction with yum history and undo it with yum history undo How to use yum history to roll back an update in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 , 7?


1

rpmbuild adds Python requiremenst automatically from the version of python used. As such, it was adding python(abi)=2.7 to the requires list of the RPM. However, when using the python27 that scl was using provides python27-python. The issue was resolved by adding the line AutoReqProv: no to the spec file in the RPM. The machine that was having the rpm ...


1

Yes, all 8 will be installed in /boot I would recommend installing them in groups and once You boot from newer kernel move old one to archive as You might need it maybe in the future.


0

Run the command below: whereis gem /usr/local/bin/gem cp /usr/local/bin/gem /sbin gem -v 2.5.1


1

Snapshots on Netapp take space based on how many blocks have changed since they were created. That can get high with time. You can safely delete any snapshot that's not in a locked state (for things like snapmirror) and that will clear up space for you. You can also configure snap autodelete to prevent the snapshots from exceeding the reserve. Snap show ...


2

For me, the below command sequence has worked as expected. I have done modifications in /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules to change the eth number and to reload them without rebooting. /etc/init.d/networking stop /etc/init.d/udev stop udevadm control --reload-rules /etc/init.d/udev start /etc/init.d/networking start Following this, it ...


0

vSphere snapshots and NetApp snapshots are very different things - as for your answer, you need someone who knows how to manage NetApps to look at your snap schedule, the current snap space being used and configure them more for your needs - it sounds like this person really isn't you.


1

The CentOS 7 anaconda "repo" command supports --install, which installs the repo information on the system being built: https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/7/html/Installation_Guide/sect-kickstart-syntax.html


1

No, it is not possible: yum intentionally manages kernel updates as new installation, rather than true upgrades. If your /boot partition is full, you should first remove oldest kernels (but not the one currently running - you can find it issuing uname -a) using yum remove. After that, you can install the newer kernels.


-1

Tried the above and not working I tried the following, but only the last content_filter was executed.. smtp inet n - n - - smtpd -v -o content_filter=autoresponder:dummy -o content_filter=dfilt: -o receive_override_options=no_address_mappings


0

@Cicero can u show the cmd that u r using on client & file permission on server side. Generally this error comes when destination host or file path is not correct. check Ques3 here if it helps I don't have reputation to comment so replying through Answer.


3

You can add your script in ~/.bash_profile where ~ represents the homedir of the user for which running the script is intended.


1

After partition resize, you should reboot the system to be 100% sure that kernel recognizes the new size. After that: you had to resize the LVM volume, issuing lvextend /dev/system/tmp -L 5G you had to resize the filesystem, issuing resize2fs /dev/system/tmp Please pay much attention to issuing the above command against the correct devices. For example, ...


1

Simply by moving the file away/deleting it and reinstalling appropriate package. $ rpm -qf /etc/ssh/sshd_config # to find out what package owns the file openssh-server $ mv /etc/ssh/sshd_config{,.old} # backup the modified version $ yum reinstall openssh-server # will create the file with default configuration


0

You sound like you are opposing production and development, but when you do that the "development" environment is not where you actually execute your IDE. A better name is "testing" environment. You want to have your development (graphical desktop, IDE, whatever) on your machine (just maybe in a VM). Then you export your deliverables (code, any files you ...


0

A fellow employee of mine, helped me with this issue, and it was something to do with rhnplugin. Once it was disabled/removed, yum was able to do its work.


2

As per RHEL7/Centos7 there is no iptables service available in the default install. Instead they want you to use firewalld which is turned on by default. (see man firewall-cmd for more information on how to operate firewalld ) If you want to use iptables u need to install iptables-services and enable them with systemctl enable iptables. You will need to ...


0

Rules created with the iptables command are stored in memory. If the system is restarted before saving the iptables rule set, all rules are lost. For netfilter rules to persist through a system reboot, they need to be saved first. To save rules, type the following command as root: iptables-save or service iptables save After this restart the ...



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