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20

If you'd have posted the domain name (so we can do a WHOIS lookup on it) it would have been more helpful. That being said, there are typically 3-4 contacts for a domain. Registrant, Technical, Billing, and Administrator. As long as you're listed in at least ONE of these three you have a good chance of getting your domain. The process varies from ...


16

I've used Namecheap for many years and haven't had any trouble. Good prompt service when a registry somehow deleted a name from existence, they helped me get it working again right away (they did all the dealings with the registry).


11

Not sure what you've heard about GoDaddy, but I use them for about 200 of my domains and have been really happy. I've registered, transfered in and out, used their DNS, domain parking, etc., and not had any problems. I've also transfered several domains there for my clients who were having (bad) problems elsewhere, and they've been very happy. I think the ...


10

Gandi is an awesome registrar !


8

Look at dyndns.com, which is all about DNS. These guys know their stuff. They don't just do dynamic DNS, they also do static as well. Their nameservers are geographically dispersed, they're fully redundant, and their web interface is straightforward. They claim only a single outage in years and years of service. They will gladly register your domain for ...


7

Is it unreasonable of me to have assumed that because the update was from <... trimmed ...> YES. Generally speaking, it is unreasonable for you to make ANY assumption about ANY change performed through control panel software (except the standard assumption that it's going to screw up somehow). That includes DNS registrar management interfaces ...


5

GoDaddy support .com and .net, not sure about the others. gkg.net also support glue records apparently, although not used them. There's a nice list for all others here.


5

With many registrars you can have the registrar listed as the contact. This is in order to provide privacy for the person or organisation that has actually registered the domain.e.g. I have a domain with DynDNS but you won't find my details listed anywhere. A whois on my domain will only show DyDNS as a contact.


5

The best thing to do is to think about what the values mean, and then tune them appropriately. If you haven't already read the RIPE-203 document you cited, you should do so, since it explains each of the records and why RIPE chose particular values: 4.4. The Refresh and Retry Values The refresh and retry values primarily affect the zone maintainer ...


4

I've used PairNIC for a number of years. The service is absolutely utterly rock solid, the web site is no-nonsense, and if you have a question a real live US-based human answers with a useful answer. They concentrate on providing a good service rather than being famous for annoying advertising like a certain other registrar. They aren't the cheapest out ...


4

I use and recommend Nearly Free Speech Their domains are fairly priced at $8.59 per year and as a geek I like their philosophy. Domains page: https://www.nearlyfreespeech.net/services/domains.php Philosophy: https://www.nearlyfreespeech.net/about/background.php NOTE: Dreamhost should probably be moved into another answer. I also use Dreamhost but ...


4

I've used GoDaddy, but never will in the future. They happen to be a customer of ours, and knowing how their environment is setup scares me. I've heard many good things about pairnic.com.


4

Any given zone as defined in DNS can only have one authoritative source of information. You can't have the MX records for a zone hosted on one server and the TXT records (which is what SPF uses) on another server. You can delegate sub-domains to another server (you could tell the main server to delegate the 'www' sub-domain out to another DNS server, but ...


4

You could really go with either. If you like the registrar's DNS management tools, then you can continue to use them. If you feel the hosting company's offerings are better or that their DNS service is more reliable, you can switch to them. One thing to consider is that if you ever switch hosting companies, having your DNS managed by your registrar might ...


4

Probably neither are liable due to the TOS you agreed to. Next time pay for a decent provider. Remember.. you get what you pay for.


4

Sure, it will still work; they aren't actually related in any technical way (registrars just like to bundle certificates with registration/hosting/etc. to make more money). Any browser that has Gandi's public key in its certificates list (should be just about all of them) will still accept it for as long as it's valid.


3

SnapNames.com One of the biggest firms for getting expiring domains is SnapNames.com. I think the price is something like $59 and they'll provide you with a "SnapBack" on the domain name of your choice. SnapNames has partnered with a large number of registrars (both large and small) to help boost their chance of success. They attempt to register domain ...


3

Gandi.net has them and they're great !


3

May not be a complete solution -- but, try Domize.com


3

Unless you are capable of hosting at least two DNS servers in geographically diverse locations, its much better to let someone else handle it. As far as CPU usage goes, DNS queries are cheap.


3

I'm in Canada and use Webnames. They are the company that grew out of the original .CA registry, so they've been around a long time. CON: They don't offer any big discounts on name registration, just small ones for multiple years. PRO: They're stable and reliable. As a registrar, they're always going to be there, and their hosting services are solid. ...


3

Every name server must have a resolvable name, because the definition of an NS record requires it, e.g.: $ORIGIN example.com @ IN SOA ( ... ) @ IN NS ns1.example.com IN NS ns2.example.com ns1 IN A 192.168.1.1 ns2 IN A 10.0.0.1 The example above is what's necessary if the hostnames for the name servers for your domain are within the same domain. ...


3

This is the kind of request that has to be done via a WHOIS, and they rely on published registrar entries. Some TLD's (such as .to) do not publish a public WHOIS. Others, such as .com.au, each registrar maintains their own WHOIS, so you need to find out which registrar the domain is registered with an then query their WHOIS. Also, all web-based WHOIS ...


3

Does your DNS registrar not allow you to setup an account for your technical contact? Most registrars do, and this is usually adequate. You do not have to host your DNS with your registrar. You could delegate authority for the zone to some other DNS hosting service. Then give out access to the hosted DNS control panel without giving out access to the ...


3

A couple of things: I don't think this is very, very bad from the standpoint that nothing is going to happen other than the fact that his namespace is not going to be resolved correctly and consistently until this gets fixed. As far as hierarchy goes, that hasn't changed. His namespace and DNS records are still at the same level in the hierarchy. Creating ...


3

I googled for "domain registrar api", and came across several seemingly useful results: enom.com opensrs.com resellerclub.com dynadot.com joker.com domainpeople.com And many others, so I suggest you use the power of Google to find one that suits you.


3

An "unregister" is a REGISTER wherein you set the expires for one or more Contact URIs to 0. You may do so either with the Expires header - "Expires: 0" - which applies to all Contact URIs in the REGISTER, or with a parameter - "Contact: ;expires=0 - which will only affect that URI's registration. You may also unregister ALL contact URIs for your ...


3

In the early 90's domains were given away for free till a company that would become Network Solutions got the government contract to control the major TLDs. Once they got control it cost $100 for 2 years. I think there was some giant lawsuit that lead it to be dropped to $70 for 2 years.


3

Exactly. You have to create NS records (and glue records) at the registrar that designate your server as the name server for your domain.



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