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139

This is going to be a function of your workload and the class of drive you purchase... In my server deployments, I have not had a properly-spec'd SSD fail. That's across many different types of drives, applications and workloads. Remember, not all SSDs are the same!! So what does "properly-spec'd" mean? If your question is about SSD use in enterprise ...


48

Every laptop at my work has either a SSDs or Hybrid since 2009. My SSD experience in summary: What I'll call "1st Generation" drives, sold around 2009 mostly: In the first year about 1/4 died, almost all from Syndrome of Sudden Death (SSD - It's funny, laugh). This was very noticeable to end users, and annoying, but the drastic speed difference made this ...


20

I vote for NFS. NFSv4.1 added the Parallel NFS pNFS capability, which makes parallel data access possible. I am wondering what kind of clients are using the storage if only Unix-like then I would go for NFS based on the performance figures.


20

Unfortunately, there is no best way for you. 30 year archival of digital media is a very hard problem and takes routine investment. About the only formats guaranteed to be readable in 30 years are ASCII and UTF8, which are not video formats. Storage formats change, the 8 track reel-to-reel tapes we were using 30 years ago are nigh impossible to read these ...


16

Typical "working hours" are no more than 40 hours of a week. Less in some parts of the world. A week contains a total of 168 hours. 40/168 = less than 24% of the time of a week is 'working hours'. That suggests that failures of systems that are running 24/7 will occur 3-times more often during non-working hours than working hours. Obviously, there are many ...


15

Can I expect that after [10 years] the data would be preserved as well [on an SSD as on] a tape? No. OK, so strictly speaking, I have no solid scientific evidence for that statement. But on the other hand, nobody has solid evidence for the opposite position either. NVRAM has been thoroughly tested on its own. But modeling all failure cases for an ...


14

What exactly does it do? The excerpt from this Compaq document explains it well: Power interruptions, even for brief moments, result in the loss of data which was being written to or read from storage... Power interruptions can have terminal effects on data which is in the process of being written and is temporarily residing in cache. This data does not yet ...


13

The short answer is use NFS. According to this shootout and my own experience, it's faster. But, you've got more options! You should consider a cluster FS like GFS, which is a filesystem multiple computers can access at once. Basically, you share a block device via iSCSI which is a GFS filesystem. All clients (initiators in iSCSI parlance) can read and ...


13

In my experience, the real problem are the dying controllers, not the flash memory itself. I've installed around 10 Samsung SSDs (830, 840 [not pro]) and none of them has made any problems so far. The total opposite are drives with Sandforce controllers, i had several problems with OCZ agility drives, especially freezes in irregular time intervals, where the ...


11

In my experience, it's been heat. There's not a lot of airflow in these devices (no fans) and they're usually tucked up in closets or somewhere with no airflow. My last wireless router was screwed into a wall high in a closet. It lasted a year, and the case was always warm. When I replaced it (with the same model of linksys), I put a fan up there with it and ...


11

We have a 2 server load-blanacing web cluster.We have tried the following methods for syncing content between the servers: Local drives on each server synced with RSYNC every 10 minutes A central CIFS (SAMBA) share to both servers A central NFS share to both servers A shared SAN drive running OCFS2 mounted both servers The RSYNC solution was the ...


11

I totally agree with sysadmin1138's post in every way bar one caveat - I don't think you're going to have the budget to really achieve what you want. There are 5 main functions you need to create; a standardised content and catalogue policy - I know you want to store everything in one format but you really should consider two - PDF for images and H.264 ...


10

Yes, we find it, and no, it's no fluke. Your servers hate you, I'm sure. I know my servers hate me, and whilst they'd happily see me dead, if they feel themselves flagging I'm sure they hold on until their ntp daemons whisper in their ears that it's the middle of the night, and now is a good time to die. They know that to fail at 1030h will ruin my day, ...


9

Many of these small devices have a hard time with power sags and brownouts. If the power goes completely out (and stays off for a few seconds), then comes back on, things are OK, but other power problems cause lockups or other strange problems (returns pings, but won't route). When we moved into our house 8 years ago, our power was rock solid for several ...


8

ECC RAM basically helps to prevent errors that occur when reading and writing from RAM. The chance of there actually being an error is quite small, but non-zero. I would say that if you aren't doing mission-critical stuff you could get away without ECC RAM - like I said, the chances of encountering an error that ECC would prevent is really, really small.


8

Data published by CERN IT staff (Data Integrity) would suggest that the amount of errors that comes from RAM is quite low. You still have to weight your data and the cost of hardware. You can read a bit more about this at StorageMojo.


7

One of the biggest factors here is the conditioning of the power before it gets to the power supplies. Server type hardware tends to be protected by UPS's and this generally seems to extend the life of the power supply because it gets a much cleaner sine wave and is generally subjected to far fewer hiccups etc. Most often, the power supply (and most of the ...


6

Two reasons heat and age. Inexpensive home routers have very poor heat dissipation, causing lockups and poor transfer rates. Transmitters wear out over time (probably due to item #1) Every WiFi router I've owned has lost the transmitter eventually (usually long before the wired connections failed.) You can extend the life of the router by mounting it in ...


6

My rule-of-thumb for clients is: two nines you get for free. Every extra nine increases cost by up to an order of magnitude. That is to say, you can have 99% uptime by just putting your application on a half-decent server on your corporate internet connection. To improve on that, you can colocate. You can colocate with load-balancing and fast failover. ...


5

Using the hard disk will most certainly increase the risk that it breaks, compared to not using it... However, since the drive can break anyway, I recommend you come up with some backup strategy for the actual data you are interested in. Backup to a second drive, or using RAID are the common strategies; depending on the risk you might want to backup to a ...


5

This all boils down to risk management. Doing a proper cost/risk analysis of your IT systems will help you figure out where to spend the money and what risks you can or have to live with. There's a cost associated with everything...this includes HA and downtime. I work at a small place so I understand this struggle and the IT geek in me wants no single ...


5

There is not enough data to be certain of the reliability of SSDs... There have been several examples of bad firmware destroying data. There is also wear problems and other issues. Data recovery from SSD disks is less well developed than the process of extracting from crashed hard disks. But they are far less sensitive to to vibrations and shocks, as there ...


5

I have two 500GB drives in a zfs-fuse mirror setup on my home NAS (debian lenny). It has been running for almost 6 months now, and I have not had problems. More details here on my blog.


5

nobody can answer this question better than youself. in other words, test it. it's not hard to do: take a typical machine, make it perform a similar load to what you want to do (in my case it was about copying small files between two SAN volumes). and while it's under heavy load, make it fail. try every failure you can imagine (in my case it was mostly ...


5

I think it is a bit early to tell if SSDs are any good at long-term vault storage.


5

It's not worth it. With ECC RAM and running HP management agents, it's pretty easy to detect bad memory. There are typically a few steps to intervene before you see a major problem that affects operation. Under standard support, RAM replacement is next-business-day, so there's no need to complicate your RAM arrangement by adding spare DIMMs. The worst HP ...


5

It uses UDP to get through stupid NAT devices. What's happening here is that the actual IPSec traffic is being encapsulated in UDP (IP protocol 17). The native IPSec packet would have an IP protocol header-value of 50. Since 50 is neither UDP (17) or TCP (6), stupid NAT gateways will drop the packet rather than pass it. Secondly, since IPSec is neither TCP ...


5

Yes, you can achieve high availability for all the services you listed without using a shared disk solution. Exchange 2010: Database Availability Groups (minimum three servers where one is just a file share, remember to load-balance client requests properly.) SQL 2012: AlywasOn availability groups. SQL 2008 R2 and downwards: Mirroring/log shipping VHD ...


4

One thing that comes to mind is that maybe it's not the device, but that the environment has become more noisy. More microwaves/phones/cell towers, and more other wireless networks in closer proximity may be giving your router fits.



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