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0

Figured out my problem. An IP conflict. :( Wonderful.


0

VNC is a good tool, but not in any open or work environment unless you encrypt it. There are VNC servers and clients that support this but you can do it using an ssl tunnel. Firewall off the normal VNC ports, then open an ssh connection with a tunnel from your workstation/tablet/whatever. I use putty for this. So long as the tunnel connection is open you ...


1

For the enlightenment of those supplying the comments: in the old unix days (mid 1980s), certain ports could be queried via inetd for responses: for example, "finger" would be able to provide information about a user on a remote host. The OP of this thread is basically asking if there is a similar way that one can obtain the date/time of a remote Linux host. ...


5

It sounds like you are trying to solve the symptom and not the problem. I would suggest that a time sever hierarchy in your organization would be the appropriate and professional approach and that the effort it would take to either implement a monitoring system (which you will want eventually) or hack together some kind of script with cywgin to check to ...


2

If you have a remote console and can remotely re-image the box, you should be able to remotely boot a rescue image as well. If that is not possible for some reason (lack of admin access to tftp/dhcp/pxe servers, no remote power control, etc.), maybe you could use a local exploit of some sort, eg (since I don't know the exact kernel version) ...


2

If your iptables rule was temporary, you could try a reboot. Else, you would need console access to the machine, in which you could boot into single user mode and change it back. Otherwise, you have effectively firewalled yourself out and would need to re-image if you can't get a console.


3

I'd suggest just buying better servers. You want this functionality built into the hardware platform, not as an add-on... Yes, this could be done with switched PDUs (e.g. APC 8941), IP KVMs (i.e. Raritan rackmount or Lantronix Spider)... the higher-end IP KVMs can also perform virtual media functionality via USB dongle. I've had to manage an environment ...


1

So, given the real IP address here is the traceroute; Note the routing appears to change regularly, but these two examples appear to take similar paths. Port 80 traceroute to 103.231.8.238 (103.231.8.238), 30 hops max, 60 byte packets 1 192.168.1.1 0.290 ms 0.435 ms 0.520 ms 2 92.25.242.1 13.350 ms 13.348 ms 13.343 ms 3 78.151.225.189 15.084 ...


3

The traffic is likely being filtered. Because you supplied your domain name (assuming here, that despite having two A records with two different addresses 141.101.117.86 is accurate.. Tracerouting to port 80, which we can demonstrably prove is open.. $ sudo traceroute -T -O info 141.101.117.86 -p 80 traceroute to 141.101.117.86 (141.101.117.86), 30 hops ...


1

To be honest, I've never used rsh (only SSH). I am under the impression the rsh server is not started / listening to connection properly. Is the server process running ps aux | grep rsh Note: "ps aux" will list all processes. You should have a line with "rsh". Is the process listening to TCP/514 ss -t -l Note: Display all tcp socket which ...


2

This isn't completely true, there is a way around it that I found purely by accident while trying to get this to work. I too run a dedicated graphics card (Nvidia Quadro K600) because I have a 30" monitor and the in built graphics won't run at the resolution I want. The connection is through a KVM switch - this is key to this solution. You have to have the ...


1

You can read the text currently displayed on the screen from /dev/vcs. If your terminal window has the same number of columns as the actual screen output on the server, then you can simply type cat /dev/vcs and get a recognizable output. You can append a number to access a specific console rather than always the active console. And you can use vcsa, if you ...


3

It looks like you have a private IP on your server. So you need a DNAT / port forwarding rule on the gateway that directs to port 80 on the web server.


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If it's an actual server, it will have out of band management (IPMI) features which will allow you to access the system console. For instance Dell servers call it iDRAC, HP servers have iLO, etc. If your server has no such functionality then you can connect an IP KVM device to it.


0

Here they suggest the following solution using WmiSecurity: WmiSecurity.exe /C="%computername%" /A /N=Root/CIMV2 /M=" DOMAIN\USER:REMOTEACCESS" /R Alternatively, you can use the built-in utility like demonstrated here. But I think that both solutions can't limit the access just to processes information.



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