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19

The first thing I do when RDP is not talking is this in Powershell: PS> $service = get-service -computername MyServer -displayname "Remote Desktop Services" PS> $service.stop PS> $service.start The majority of the time this revives RDP and I can get back in. If this doesn't do the trick then I have to rely on iLO or one of the other console ...


10

See this question here for your command line options. Basically, you've got WinRS/WinRM, PowerShell Remoting and PSexec and the other SysInternals Suite utilities. You can also install SSH, or even telnet on a Windows server, and connect to that, once it's installed. Additionally, your tools in the Administrative Tools folder will let you connect to ...


9

To display the Start screen in your remote desktop session, press Alt+Home.


8

Try Group Policy Preferences. These provide fairly painless support for the mapping of network drives, and can be set to only apply to particular groups, leaving you to create just one GPP for each group. You could then bundle up any other custom settings for each group into the same Group Policy object while you were at it.


7

A Remote Desktop Gateway server would do the job for you. From here: Remote Desktop Gateway (RD Gateway), formerly Terminal Services Gateway (TS Gateway), is a role service in the Remote Desktop Services server role included with Windows ServerĀ® 2008 R2 that enables authorized remote users to connect to resources on an internal corporate or ...


6

Q: "Can it be set in Group Policy?". A: "Yes it can." Go to Computer Configuration>Policies>Administrative Templates>Windows Components>Remote Desktop Services>Remote Desktop Session Host>Connections Specifically the Set rules for remote control of Remote Desktop Services user sessions and change it to Enabled and set the option to Full Control with User's ...


6

I'm assuming that you want to RDP to it so that you can change it's ip address? If yes, then you can try this: Temporarily assign your workstation an ip address in the same 172.18.2.x range, then RDP to the machine, then change the ip address to match your new ip address range, then change your workstation ip address back to what it was.


5

The RDP GDI Acceleration Extensions document is the closest thing I can find to an official reference, and it makes references to 16-bit RGB values being sent across the wire for things like GDI brushes as being 5/6/5 format (5 bits of red, 6 bits of green, 5 bits of blue). 5/6/5 has always been how Windows has handled 16-bit video modes (at least, in my ...


5

Remote Desktop Gateway would probably do what you're looking for. RD Gateway encapsulates the RDP protocol in HTTP or HTTPS. RD Gateway decapsulates the RDP protocol from the HTTP(S) and makes an RDP connection on behalf of the remote client to the appropriate RDP server. This allows a number of RDP servers to be present with the RD Gateway brokering ...


5

This is a licensing issue: When remote desktop is used only to administer the server, no additional licenses are required but the number of simultaneous connections is limited to two. When remote desktop is used to do normal business work on the server (eg running LOB application) or when more than 2 simultaneous connections is required, you need to buy ...


4

There is no more /console RDP switch since Windows Vista. Yes, the Remote Desktop Services mmc snapins that you were used to in 2008 have been removed. A Windows license grants you two "administrative" simultaneous remote desktop sessions before you need to install the Remote Desktop Services role with CALs. There is no "2 administrative connections +1 ...


4

No, you cannot get the MAC address of a Remote Desktop client, unless the server and the client are on the same subnet.


4

I suggest using Group Policy & the Internet Explorer Maintenance Extension for this. Create a GPO for your IE settings, link it to the Terminal Services OU. (example: IE Terminal Server Settings) Open GPO for IE settings Navigate to: User Configuration\Policies\Windows Settings\ Internet Explorer Maintenance\Security Change settings and click OK. Test ...


4

You don't just jump in to VDI as your first virtualization product. VDI typically builds on many complementary technologies, such as the hypervisor, the management suite for that hypervisor, VM images and templates, linked-clones, IP pools, etc. If you're completely new to virtualization, I'd recommend installing Hyper-V or VMware ESXi in a test lab, and ...


4

The RDP clipboard in Windows Server 2003 is notoriously unstable. Rebooting the server is the only "real" fix. If you want a more stable and reliable RDP clipboard then upgrade to Windows Server 2008 or Windows 2008 R2, both of which have significant changes and improvements to the RDP clipboard.


4

On suggestion I'm turning the comment into an answer. As it sounds that you need some sort of keep-alive signal, there is one available for RDP connections but it is turned off by default. The setting which you're looking for is: Computer Configuration -> Policies -> Admin Templates -> Windows Components -> Remote Desktop Services -> Remote ...


4

VNC on Windows acts like you are physically tapping into the keyboard, video, and mouse of the remote computer. So what you do through VNC basically has the same effect as if you were physically present at the console. Remote Desktop was originally a terminal server protocol. To permit lots of computer to run applications remotely on a server. These days ...


4

One method would be to use a Remote Desktop Gateway. The Gateway can be fitted with multiple Connection Authorization Policies and Resource Authorization Policies (CAPs and RAPs) to define exactly who is allowed to connect to what. You could, for instance, create an Active Directory security group named "Internal Network Access" and assign that security ...


4

The RDP client is interpreting the ".\" locally and filling-in the name of the local computer rather than passing the ".\" literally to the remote computer. (I believe this changed around the time that the RDP security layer was abandoned in favor of SSL, but I can't give you a specific RDP client version number...)


4

I am assuming you need to install the x64 bit driver. On your print server, go to Printer Properties, then click the Sharing tab. Click Additional Drivers.... When you download the x64 bit driver from the manufacturer's web site, you'll want to make sure the driver name matches exactly the same as the x86 driver and you should be good to go from there. ...


4

PowerShell is what you're looking for. TechNet PowerShell Remoting


3

It's not a timezone problem - the system clock is skewed too far. Timezones... don't really affect the computer in this fashion - they use epoch time anyway. (Yes, even Windows uses a system based on epoch time.) Try using the /console switch (call mstsc.exe from a command line) and a local account - otherwise, you'll have to connect physically to the ...


3

Essentially my question boils down to: does a computer joined to the domain automatically trust certificates issued by a CA on the same domain, or would they still need to be manually installed on each client device? Typically, the root certificate for your internal PKI is distributed via GPO to all clients. This makes it "automatic"


3

Were you qualifying the username you entered with the local machine name? If not, it's likely Windows was assuming you were attempting to login as the administrator account for the domain instead of the local system. In order to explicitly tell Windows that you want to login with the local administrator account you either need to qualify the username using ...


3

While you're remoted into another computer, minimize your current RDP session, then right click on the Remote Desktop icon on the taskbar and select Remote Desktop Connection. See my screenshot (it's Server 2012, but it's the same concept exactly). Alternatively you can: Minimize your current RD session and hit Start+R on your keyboard which brings up ...


3

Since it hasn't been mentioned: There's always "smart hands". Never underestimate the simplicity of calling someone and saying "can you walk over to the server and tell me what you see? ...OK...do this for me." Unless the server is orbiting the earth, that is likely an option.


3

The licensing and broker roles generally are installed to a server that is not one of the servers providing the Remote Desktop sessions to users. I have often seen these two roles put together on a single box. In a small 3 server farm the broker/license box will probably be idle most of the time. These roles seem to work perfectly fine in a VM, so also ...


3

You can use X Forwarding to do that. Make sure that firefox is installed on your server, then from your desktop, run: ssh username@ip_adress -Y [command line] if -Y does not work, you can still use -X instead. If it's not working, be sure that: in /etc/ssh/sshd_config on the server, X11Forwarding is set to yes in /etc/ssh/ssh_config on the client, ...


3

A couple of things: Computer Configuration settings apply to computers, not users. That's why you needed to add the Domain Computers group to the GPO security filtering... because Computer Configuration settings apply to computers... so the GPO can only affect Computers that are in the OU where the GPO is linked and are in the security group being used as ...


3

If you look at the properties of the RDP in rules of the Windows firewall you can configure which hosts can access from the remote computers tab.



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