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19

The first thing I do when RDP is not talking is this in Powershell: PS> $service = get-service -computername MyServer -displayname "Remote Desktop Services" PS> $service.stop PS> $service.start The majority of the time this revives RDP and I can get back in. If this doesn't do the trick then I have to rely on iLO or one of the other console ...


10

See this question here for your command line options. Basically, you've got WinRS/WinRM, PowerShell Remoting and PSexec and the other SysInternals Suite utilities. You can also install SSH, or even telnet on a Windows server, and connect to that, once it's installed. Additionally, your tools in the Administrative Tools folder will let you connect to ...


7

It doesn't require reinstallation, it requires the installation of a the remote desktop services role and the purchase of licenses to enable additional RDP connections. Why do you need so many RDP connections, is this just to manage Microsoft services on the server? Management tools can be installed on client computers to manage many of Microsoft's products ...


6

I'm assuming that you want to RDP to it so that you can change it's ip address? If yes, then you can try this: Temporarily assign your workstation an ip address in the same 172.18.2.x range, then RDP to the machine, then change the ip address to match your new ip address range, then change your workstation ip address back to what it was.


5

It turned out to be as easy as adding the users to the "Distributed COM Users" local group. The "Enable remote assistance" policy does not change this group's memberships and unsolicited remote assistance seems to depend on DCOM remote activation.


5

The RDP GDI Acceleration Extensions document is the closest thing I can find to an official reference, and it makes references to 16-bit RGB values being sent across the wire for things like GDI brushes as being 5/6/5 format (5 bits of red, 6 bits of green, 5 bits of blue). 5/6/5 has always been how Windows has handled 16-bit video modes (at least, in my ...


5

VNC on Windows acts like you are physically tapping into the keyboard, video, and mouse of the remote computer. So what you do through VNC basically has the same effect as if you were physically present at the console. Remote Desktop was originally a terminal server protocol. To permit lots of computer to run applications remotely on a server. These days ...


5

Remote Desktop Gateway would probably do what you're looking for. RD Gateway encapsulates the RDP protocol in HTTP or HTTPS. RD Gateway decapsulates the RDP protocol from the HTTP(S) and makes an RDP connection on behalf of the remote client to the appropriate RDP server. This allows a number of RDP servers to be present with the RD Gateway brokering ...


4

One method would be to use a Remote Desktop Gateway. The Gateway can be fitted with multiple Connection Authorization Policies and Resource Authorization Policies (CAPs and RAPs) to define exactly who is allowed to connect to what. You could, for instance, create an Active Directory security group named "Internal Network Access" and assign that security ...


4

The licensing and broker roles generally are installed to a server that is not one of the servers providing the Remote Desktop sessions to users. I have often seen these two roles put together on a single box. In a small 3 server farm the broker/license box will probably be idle most of the time. These roles seem to work perfectly fine in a VM, so also ...


4

PowerShell is what you're looking for. TechNet PowerShell Remoting


4

I have had a similar issue a while back. Ended up being that, although I was only putting in login in CoRD's dialog, it was actually sending the down-level login name (domain\login) to the server. Once I added domain\ prefix to login on RDP, it all worked. Hope this helps.


4

To allow more remote users on your MS Windows server you need to install the terminal services role. Microsoft calls those Remote Desktop Services since MS Windows Server 2008. This does not require reinstallation but probably one or more restarts. You need client access licenses and a license manager to use this feature. The following links will give you ...


4

With a Cisco AnyConnect VPN there is an option on the client side to allow this IF the VPN admin is allowing split-tunneling. You can see the option here: As far as on the firewall itself, if you are the VPN/firewall admin (I'm guessing you aren't) then the setting is similar to this here:


4

Maybe this is related to KB2962806. You should try to apply it. I don't know how to apply this update because it is not available on the Microsoft site. I only get it with the automatic Windows update but not on every computers. This update solved a similar problem for me. And since this update is applyed on SOME computers, every others work too. I didn't ...


3

Here is the documentation on the Remote Desktop Services CAL licensing for Server 2008 R2, from Microsoft. That's as much as we're willing to say about the strictly licensing part of the issue. Regarding the technical question (the behavior of RDS): Generally speaking, the Remote Desktop Services will not block you from using those 2 default sessions you ...


3

I have had great success in making scenarios like this work in VMWare ESXi, but just one experiment with Hyper-V. In that particular instance, I ended up with a very nice setup for client VMs with vGPUs working fine, but for Windows Server edition, I could not make it work. This is actually detailed by MS here. Quoting the document: Note, RemoteFX vGPU ...


3

I suspect your corporate laptop VPN has been set up and configured a mode to tunnel ALL traffic down it and not just corporate traffic. In order for you to remote desktop, you will need to have it set up in a split mode. I am unfamiliar with the Cisco VPN but, for example on Sonicwall SRA devices the option is "Tunnel all mode". Many sysadmins setup their ...


3

net localgroup "Remote Desktop Users" Ryan /add The above command will add the user account named "Ryan" to the "Remote Desktop Users" group on the local computer.


3

I'm setting up the RDS servers in a farm - never tried it before and I need your help. Based off of your original comment at the top of the question here, and my love of RDS systems I thought I'd chime in on this one even if I get a bit lengthy. Another reason for my potentially lengthy answer is that I see this question about RDS Farms asked a lot and ...


3

Since it hasn't been mentioned: There's always "smart hands". Never underestimate the simplicity of calling someone and saying "can you walk over to the server and tell me what you see? ...OK...do this for me." Unless the server is orbiting the earth, that is likely an option.


3

It's not a timezone problem - the system clock is skewed too far. Timezones... don't really affect the computer in this fashion - they use epoch time anyway. (Yes, even Windows uses a system based on epoch time.) Try using the /console switch (call mstsc.exe from a command line) and a local account - otherwise, you'll have to connect physically to the ...


3

While you're remoted into another computer, minimize your current RDP session, then right click on the Remote Desktop icon on the taskbar and select Remote Desktop Connection. See my screenshot (it's Server 2012, but it's the same concept exactly). Alternatively you can: Minimize your current RD session and hit Start+R on your keyboard which brings up ...


2

You can use mmc to accomplish what you need since the snap-in works on remote computers. See: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc731617.aspx. The caveat to this is that you need another Windows Server computer handy to use this snap-in, and working over the network is questionable if the firewall blocks a lot of things.


2

This is a client side feature and cannot reliably be disabled from the server side. There is a way to "suggest" to the browser that it should not be saved, but this is not a standard: <form id="loginForm" action="login.cgi" method="post" autocomplete="off"> Have a look here for more information If you have control over the client computers, then ...


2

Using Group Policy Preferences is the way of mapping printers (and drivemaps) these days. Nothing even come close to the flexibility you have with the plethora of targeting rules. We run a RDS environment with 600 users spread across 80 different locations. What we did was to build a single GPO targeting all the users. This GPO controls the mapping and ...


2

You can use X Forwarding to do that. Make sure that firefox is installed on your server, then from your desktop, run: ssh username@ip_adress -Y [command line] if -Y does not work, you can still use -X instead. If it's not working, be sure that: in /etc/ssh/sshd_config on the server, X11Forwarding is set to yes in /etc/ssh/ssh_config on the client, ...


2

Is it possible to configure the server (using native Microsoft / Windows tools) to obtain the ability to connect using remote desktop to every machine in the network from my remote office? Yes, it is possible. The first question if you are in a Windows Small Business Server network is whether this is even necessary? By default, SBS installations ...


2

I am assuming this is VMware Workstation (VMware is a company that makes several different virtualization products), so the specifics will be for that product. Since you don't want to use Bridge Mode, you can use port forwarding. Enable RDP in your two VMs and then add a port forward for each VM, so for example, if your two VMs are on 192.168.88.100 and ...


2

You have so many inaccurate misconceptions of how this stuff works I'm really not sure where to start, so I'll just run down what you said and respond quickly... Sorry! I don't mean to be offensive, but almost everything you said represents a misconception of how these systems function. Each app has their own session when I'm logged in Nope. RD ...



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