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At time of writing no, you can't. See: http://dba.stackexchange.com/q/61305/7788 http://dba.stackexchange.com/q/66372/7788 Please nag them, both on the forums: https://forums.aws.amazon.com/message.jspa?messageID=547192#547192 and via any AWS sales/support contacts you may have.


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Yes. You will want to stop the secondary mongo process, comment out the replica configuration parameters ( replSet, keyFile, etc ), start the mongo process then login and perform the repair. Once it completes, stop the mongod process, change the config back to original settings and start mongod. This assumes you have a three member deployment with correct ...


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Depends on source of your data. If data you want to sync is generated somewhere else (developers workstation, etc) and only distributed to clients via those 3 servers, I would recommend to push the data to each of three servers via rsync, or some CI tool like Jenkins, keeping the files on local disks of each server. If the data is generated and served by ...


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This could easily turn into either opinion-based or "minimal understanding required" to be honest. Since this isn't a one size fits all thing. It will depend on your environment, options at your disposable, downtime allowed (which you stated), size of environment, IP network provisioning and overlap if any, and many other factors. However, given your ...


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XtreemFS seems to be the thing you want to achieve. You can probably do pretty much the same things with CephFS.


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GlusterFS is hard to deploy. For web data, file sync level like Unison is much easier to deploy and maintenance. DRBD is a perfect solution for keep data sync at block level. But you have to format them to special format like OCFS2 or something similar.


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Gluster would solve the problem you have because it can hold the locks, propagate changes - delete the file on all other nodes, but it may add additional latency that can be a problem for a webserver. The next alternative is DRBD+OCFS2 or GFS, but that's probably more complex as with gluster you are using the underlying filesystem - it doesn't operate at the ...



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