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17

I've used GParted Live CD in the past with success, it's a linux boot disk designed for partitoning. I should have mentioned that despite being a linux disk, it works for sorting out windows partitions too. I split my laptop up to install the windows 7 beta using this.


14

Method 1: Using VMWare Converter: Turn off the virtual machine; Start the VMWare Converter application; Open the wizard; Select 'standalone virtual machine' as the source and destination system; Choose 'Select volumes and resize to save or add space'; Enter a new size and voilá, you're done! Some say that the expand process is slow and that VMWare ...


7

You can use the VMWare Converter to clone the machine, but change the size of the virtual disk in the process. When configuring the Source Data, indicate that you want to "Select volumes and resize to save or add space". You will then be able to specify the size of the destination drive in the "New Disk Space" column below. If you're simply trying to ...


7

Online resizing an ext4fs from 1 TB to 2 TB, on an RAID1 lvm2 took about 1h40min on a pair of seagate barracuta 2TB SATA drives. This was the root partition. During this time, the cpu never go upper than 10% (cumulating md2_raid1 and md2_resize). The load was about 3. If your resize2fs processis eating 100% of your cpu and that your HDD don't work, it ...


6

There's a free utility you can download called VHD Resizer that should simplify this task. There is also a step-by-step walkthrough of the entire process that might be of help.


6

You need to unmount a filesystem to shrink it. So, for /home you'll want to be log in as root and umount /home. If it's 'busy'. You may need to stop any processes using files here. Then, shrink the file system to just below your targeted logical volume size. resize2fs /dev/mapper/vg_nastgweblls01-lv_home 99G Shrink the logical volume to the targeted ...


5

You could use the /extend switch of Microsoft's VHD Tool. VHD tool is an unmanaged code command-line tool which provides useful VHD manipulation functions including instant creation of large fixed-size VHDs. The source code is included. Usage: VhdTool.exe /create <FileName> <Size> [/quiet] VhdTool.exe /convert <FileName> ...


5

Just cleanly partition the new disk to any size you like and copy the data over with Carbon Copy Cloner. It will be bootable and have the size you want. You can do that on a running system, and don't need any live cd's or anything, just an usb or firewire interface for the new/second harddisk.


5

It may be easier to replace /tmp with a plain file. dd if=/dev/zero of=/var/mytmp bs=1024 count=<desired size in K> mkfs -t ext3 /var/mytmp umount /tmp mount -o loop /var/mytmp /tmp Then, create a matching mount line in your /etc/fstab file.


4

OK, well given you have a P410i controller you're in luck, you can migrate from one RAID mode to another. I would strongly urge you to backup your system first then all you need to do is either boot from the SmartStart CD that came with your system (you can always download a new copy from hp.com if you can't find it), once that's booted go into the HP Array ...


4

Yes, you can reshape raid5 to raid6, provided you have a recent enough version of mdadm. In his blog, Neil Brown, the lead architect and developer of mdadm, discusses mdadm's current capabilities to reshape arrays and change raid levels. The key points relevant here are as follows: You need version 3.1 (or newer) of mdadm, as well as a fairly recent ...


4

Something else is holding a file lock on ibdata1. Use lsof on ibdata1 and figure out who is holding the lock.


4

This depends on the specific implementation. HP and Dell controllers will let you grow most RAID levels by just adding disks. You can even convert between certain RAID levels. All online without downtime. Some implementations of software RAID do this in one form or another, some do not. All modern filesystems that I can think of support online growing of ...


4

The standard solution afforded by server-class hardware RAID controllers is to allow the growth of logical drives via: The addition of like-size (or larger) physical disks. This involves a rebalancing or redistribution of the data across the drives. Replacing individual drives in the array with larger disks, one-by-one, allowing rebuild time in between ...


4

First, resize2fs may take several hours or even more than a day to run, depending on the size of your partition. If you interrupted it while it was running, that's a very good recipe for losing all your data. All of the filesystem data structures are probably in an inconsistent state. Now, your drive has errors at the very beginning of the disk, where the ...


4

You must begin with the partition unmounted. If you can't unmount it (e.g. it's your root partition or something else the system needs to run), use something like System Rescue CD instead. Run parted, or gparted if you prefer a GUI, and resize the partition to use the extra space. I prefer gparted as it gives you a nice graphical representation, very ...


4

The possible approaches are: install a larger hard disk perform a 1:1 copy of the data from the old disk - e.g. by mirroring the old disk using Windows Disk Management or employing a 3rd party Live CD remove the old disk expand the partitions / filesystems using 3rd party utilities (see below) or install a larger hard disk copy the partitions expanding ...


4

logrotate by itself doesn't support the splitting of the rotated log/s, only compression. You may be able to get the desired behaviour by writing a script of your own that handles the splitting, and call that as a postrotate script in your logrotate configuration for that particular file/s. update: based on your comment ("it is too late to split files, ...


3

What DerfK said, but however your system is set up, this very likely will be a complicated procedure with multiple steps that all have the potential for total data loss. In most cases, I would likely choose to just reinstall the system (and get LVM into the mix at some point) or, alternatively, free up some space on /. For this, you could move some ...


3

You can resize a dmcrypt volume with resize: cryptsetup --help|grep -i resize resize <name> - resize active device After that's completed, you can resize2fs. As for you comment about the random data: you can also do that from within the file system. So, resize it, mount it and then fill up every last byte with a random file: dd if=/dev/urandom ...


3

That is caused because you have snapshots for that VM. If you don't need them, you must first remove them and then you will be able to grow your disk. If you need the snapshots, you will need to modify manually the config file for that VM. SSH to the node and modify the file /etc/pve/qemu-server/VMID.conf where VMID is the number ID of the VM. Modify the ...


3

You certainly cannot unmount / ; you could perhaps first pivot_root to another / then umount the previous /, but there always has to be a /, and you cannot unmount a filesystem in use (and if it is /, it must be in use). Are you needing to grow or shink the partition? Some filesystems (such as ext2/ext3/ext4) will allow online growing, but not necessarily ...


3

in most cases you can resize your filesystem online, there is no need to umount it. it looks like you are using LVM so in high level your steps are: add another LVM partition to your disk add this partition as a physical volume to your volume group resize your logical volume use resize2fs to expand your filesystem to the new size


3

If you ran resize2fs with the -p option, it would print out regular progress reports. However, since you didn't, there doesn't seem to be any way to get that information while it's running. This related question seems to indicate that it is fairly normal for resize2fs to run for a very long time.


3

There are plenty of ways to check if a process is running. An old school ps aux | grep resize2fs would do the trick, just as well as pgrep -l resize2fs. You could also use top or htop and search for the process. There is a good chance that resize2fs aborted when your session got disconnected. If that is a concern, run it from within screen next time (as ...


3

You grow LVM by either: Resizing the underlying block device and running pvresize, or Adding additional PVs to your volume group. Your disk information above is a little unclear, so I'm going to ignore it and give you a general description of the procedure. If your 1TB disk is otherwise empty, except for the LVM partition, then you can simply: Use ...


3

In theory, yes, you can calculate the exact size of the LV required by the filesystem -- when resize2fs does it's thing, it'll print out how many blocks are in use. Unfortunately, getting it slightly wrong results in a broken filesystem, and wasting 100MB of space in exchange for not boning a filesystem is a tradeoff most people are willing to make. EDIT: ...


3

If you want to shrink a thin provisioned drive you probably need to start by using a tool like zerofree or sdelete to zero out all the empty space. Then use a tool appropriate to your hypervisor to clone recreate the VM from the old disk file. With Vmware products you can use VMware Converter to create a new VM from the old and if you thin-provision the ...


3

You have two options: move all the misaligned VMs into a datastore created specifically for that misalignment, or fix all the VMs. If you decide to fix the VMs, my understanding is that you will need to reboot the servers. Here's a Netapp link you can start research on if you decide to take an outage. mbrscan and mbralign are the tools needed. If you can't ...


3

Why not just tell MySQL to do its work elsewhere? Either set TMPDIR in MySQL's environment, or set tmpdir = /some/non/tmp/path in my.cnf.



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