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8

You can use this command to see the top 10 applications regarding RAM usage: ps -A --sort -rss -o comm,pmem | head -n 11 Sometimes this command helps you if many sub processes have been generated: ps auxf This way you can see which processes belong together.


7

Running top in batch mode to report memory sizes periodically can be used to see who is using the memory when things go south. Runing sar in batch mode should give some good diagnostics on memory use, and related I/O. Running munin to monitor the system should give you a graph with good detail on what memory is being used for. This may help a lot. You ...


7

Book-wise, I recommend both Windows PowerShell in Action by Bruce Payette and Windows PowerShell Cookbook by Lee Holmes. Payette's book is more of a deep dive into how PowerShell works, and the "Cookbook" is all about solving specific problems.


6

The Debugging Tools for Windows has STOP codes in its help file. Simply search for bug check and the error code, e.g. "bug check 0xf4". (Thanks Windows Internals) Doesn't seem like the best option if you don't have it already installed.


6

Learn to use "sar", you'll be glad you did. Install the "sysstat" package. It will record tons of useful system statistics, CPU, memory usage, I/O, and more. The default retention period is 7 days I believe. Then you can go back in time for the day you want like this (for the 2nd, for example): sar -C -f /var/log/sysstat/sa02


5

Nothing is really using that memory in terms of applications. You need to deduct the 'cached' value which represents the page cache to get a better idea as to what your actual memory usage is in terms of program usage. Basically this is good memory management and this is ideally what you want. See the link here for more infomation: ...


4

Computers do exactly what they are told. The only way to ensure that a script "behaves properly" is to write it so that it will behave properly, under all scenarios. Some basic advice: Implement some kind of monitoring system. The fact that your system blew up without you knowing it was coming tells me you either do not have a monitoring system, or ...


4

You will see 6 x 2.4GHz (14.4GHz). The Intel HyperThreaded CPU cores do not count towards the CPU resources. Here's an example with a single quad-core Intel 2.26GHz CPU: And the socket information:


4

You can try Windows System Resource Manager. I don't believe you can control bandwidth but you can control CPU and memory usage. http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/technologies/management/wsrm/default.mspx http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc771218%28WS.10%29.aspx


4

More important than the frequency of execution is the nature of the script that's being executed. If the particular script uses a lot of resources when it executes, then your site users will probably see a lag in performance. It seems to me that a script that takes a minute to execute might be fairly demanding on system resources.


4

One the Windows side, I like TechNet magazine which has a print version, but is also available free online here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/default.aspx and Windows IT Pro which has their current articles online for free, but requires a subscription to read back articles (especially when I need a given answer from an old article ;)


4

I try to visit Hacker News daily (http://news.ycombinator.com/). Its a news aggregation website showing voted tech news by its registered members, somewhat a la serverfault. I also have a bunch of technology video/audio podcasts that I download to my iPhone daily. I do once in a while run through Linux Magazine or Linuz Journal to see if there's ...


3

You might look at a couple of the free e-books available as well, such as the two listed below. Effective Windows Powershell and The eBooklet Series: An Introduction to Microsoft PowerShell


3

I liked these two books: Windows PowerShell in Action by Bruce Payette Windows PowerShell Pocket Reference by Lee Holmes Also, check out these sites: MS Script Center Scripting with Windows PowerShell The PowerShell blog PowerGUI


3

I would recommend the following eBooks and eBooklets: Mastering PowerShell, a 20-chapter eBook by Dr. Tobias Weltner (PowerShell MVP). This is an English version of Scripting mit Windows PowerShell - Der Einsteiger-Workshop (656 pages) Effective Windows PowerShell, free 50-page eBook by Keith Hill (PowerShell MVP) Two Windows PowerShell Workbooks including ...


3

On Windows the only good way to find out (known to me) is to set an application pool for every site. By default everything is within a default application pool. Once they have their own application pool, they also have their own process. Having their own process will show you which one is taking all the ressources within the task manager. Good luck.


3

cPanel's not known for having the most CPU/Memory efficient processes out there. I'd be pointing the finger in that direction primarily. You could try using a service that injects IPTables rules, such as fail2ban or denyhosts, both of which are a lot lighter-weight and lower level than cpHulk appears to be. Your hosting provider ("iWeb") should be doing ...


3

In the creation of your daemontools::envfile object, you should add a unique identifier to the $name of the object. daemontools::envfile { $something_unique$env_names: path => $path, value => $envvars } By default, $name is each of your $env_names. When you create the second object with the same set of keys, it causes many duplicates. ...


3

Right, you're using $env_names (you may also want to look at consistent use of underscores there) as the $name for daemontools::envfile for semi-hacky iteration - I assume you don't want to use the future parser (quite reasonably). Note that also what you're trying to do with value => $envvars probably won't work either. So, prefix from puppetlabs/stdlib ...


3

You can use regsubst() function to modify an array of strings and return an array. See Puppet Function Reference. $filenames = ['fileA', 'fileB', 'fileC'] $filepaths_dir1 = regsubst($filenames, '^', '/path/to/dir1/') file {$filepaths_dir1: ensure => present, } Keep in mind that file resource title needs to be a fully qualified path, or the full ...


3

For the RAM: with what you're running, your free RAM is more than enough. After buffers and cache, you're still just at 30% utilization. (The key thing is the free column in the +/- buffers/cache row) For the CPU: Again, you're in the clear at 1% average. If it starts spiking to 100% regularly, then you have some capacity or code issues. As far as when ...


2

WMIC can be used to find pretty much anything you want provided you are prepared to do a bit of digging - for information similar to the examples you asked about: wmic computersystem get DNSHostname, Domain, Manufacturer, Model, NumberofLogicalProcessors, NumberofProcessors, SystemType, TotalPhysicalMemory wmic logicaldisk get Caption, FileSystem, ...


2

if its a web managed port then yes, check the make and model and get the manual from the maker, it will generally advise you the default settings, virtually all web managed switches i know of simply give the switch an IP on the network and you can manage it from anywhere on the network as long as the switch is connected to it managed switches are good for ...


2

The primary drawback is to memory consumption if you are on a low memory machine and have a huge number of file handles open. Each of those file handles consumes a small amount of memory. Nowadays, I wouldn't really worry about it. I'd just monitor it and adjust accordingly as needed. If you're continuing to run out of file handles, you have something else ...


2

Look in the jvm log for evidence it is hitting resource limits. Stack size might be the problem, depending how many java threads the killed process was running. Searching on your error message finds bug reports for pam_keyinit: check with your vendor's repository whether an updated version is available.


2

It's been a while since I used this but a define should handle what you want. define myfiles::config ($directory_name, $file_name) { ; add command to create directories if needed file { "myfiles/conf.d/$directory_name/$file_name": ensure => present, ... } } $directory_name= <from array> $file_name= <from array> ; loop the ...


2

For complete bandwidth control you will most likely need to setup a proxy with authentication, and give separate login/password pairs to your users. This way you will control both speed and total traffic consumed per month. Look for something like Kerio, ISA, Wingate, 3proxy, Freeproxy. Squid could be capable of doing that, too.


2

I'm not sure that this is what you're looking for, but the closest thing I can think of would be Monitoring Exchange, which keeps scripts that enable admins to enhance their remote monitoring. There's also a thread on HP's forums devoted to sysadmin scripts, but it's pretty old. If you want tips on writing good scripts, my fellow blogger Bob Plankers ...


2

The only way that UNC connections would consume less resources than a mapped drive is in the single case of how often those connections are opened. When you have a large number of mapped drives, the simple act of opening Windows Explorer or any open/save dialog that displays drive maps causes that workstation to reconnect to those resources. Have 15 drive ...


2

I honestly couldn't foresee much of a performance gain from having three seperate vm's, mainly for the fact that i'm guessing they'll be on the same host, and therefore will still be fighting over disk i/o. Also, with seperate vm's any queries that go across databases will have to hit the other vms. Seperate vm's also means more overhead. Each vm means ...



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