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5

Reverse DNS points an IP to a domain name. An ISP/Hosting company should own the IP range, and it should be no problem at all for them to create a reverse DNS entry for your IP, unless it's not just your IP (you're on shared hosting). Should that be the case, you are not going to get anywhere. Your ISP/Hosting probably can get you your own individual IP, ...


3

The information they need from you is the name(s) of your DNS server(s). You can chose to set up your own authoritative DNS servers for that purpose, or you can chose to use one of the many providers of authoritative DNS servers. Some of them are free some are not, some supports RDNS for IPv6 some do not. Since the information you need to give the provider ...


2

In a word, yes. Their message means they are willing to have you set up a BIND server to control rDNS records yourself for the IPv6 block you have been allocated.


0

Within named.conf, one can specify check-names ignore for the zone. Presumably in-addr.arpa zones default to fail whereas forward-lookup zones do not.


0

If you want reliability then you'll want to make sure your email/marketing domains specify your e-mail server in their SPF record. Also, amongst other things, you'll want to throttle the amount of e-mails you're sending per hour/time interval. http://www.openspf.org/FAQ/Examples Check your domains and the e-mail server's IP via the RBLs to make sure it's ...


1

The PTR reverse record is supposed to point to the canonical hostname of the server, it's not directly tied to any email addresses. Ie, the PTR record should probably point to something like zeus.example.com. This has no actual implication regarding which domains the server is expected to deliver mail for, it's just a sign of a correctly set up ...


1

The receiving mail servers just want to see a valid PTR record when they query. It doesn't have to match the domain in the email. For example: Let's say you host emails for domain1.com and domain2.com at 1.1.1.1 When the receiving server does a query on 1.1.1.1, they just want to see a domain come back. It doesn't matter if it is domain1.com, ...


0

OK, your subnet mask for a /23 network would be 255.255.254.0, and it looks like Microsoft would recommend using a reverse zone of 16.172.in-addr.arpa for that. Seems weird, but I checked on our DNS server, and our reverse lookup zones are setup that way as well, and we have no problems with it. If you had a large number of hosts in the 172.16.0.0/16 ...


0

The problem "Reverse DNS Mismatch" should be solved with my ISP or with the company where I bought the domain? Your ISP. The TLS warning is good information, but not a "problem", will not lead to spam flagging. Make sure your forward and reverse DNS, and HELO match. Ie: the software is configured to use mail.example.com, the IP it uses reverses to ...



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