Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

Apache would see the IP address 192.168.0.123 as the source and that needs to be added the RPAF_proxyips directive, this tells mod_rpaf that its a known proxy. Quoting from http://www.stderr.net/apache/rpaf/ It changes the remote address of the client visible to other Apache modules when two conditions are satisfied. First condition is that the remote ...


2

You can't do this with mod_rewrite, as that is only for requests. Further, operating on Location is not a 100% solution (that it would be pretty high), as it won't capture things like HTTP meta-refresh (not very common these days...), or instances where the URL is generated using client-side solutions (eg. Javascript, embedded content). Thus, the desire ...


1

Based on what I've read you should be able to continue down your current route. One thing that is very important if you are using a dual homed TMG is to use the "change source IP" options in your publishing rules. Without it you'll have your traffic routed back out the Cisco device and likely dropped since it doesn't have an established connection. That's ...


1

If you do not need sharding, haproxy is a good choice. haproxy is transparent, so you can use all redis command(scan/keys/info ...) but you may need sharding someday :)


1

As far as I know, AWS does not have a built-in implementation for reverse proxy, even for ELBs. You can use Apache, Nginx or HAProxy for a reverse proxy implementation, though.


1

The location syntax you have doesn't seem like what you are trying to do. If you are trying to do regex with the location URL, the proper syntax is: location ~ /ws.* { If you are trying to do everything under ws directory, you should have: location /ws/ { You may want to review the documentation for more information on location. ...


1

For nginx-to-apache in same host and single public IP address (for example 192.168.99.1), there are several available options: Nginx listen on 192.168.99.1 port 80 and and Apache listen on 192.168.99.1 on other ports except 80 (for example port 8080) Nginx listen on 192.168.99.1 port 80 and and Apache listen on 127.0.0.1 on port 80 (the same port) The ...


1

This configuration will do what you want: server { listen 80: server_name example.com; return 301 https://$server_name/subdirectory; } server { listen 443; server_name example.com; location = / { return 301 https://$server_name/subdirectory; } } The = / specifiers means a full match, so it matches only the exact root ...


1

You can just use the stunnel service in client mode to listen for unencrypted traffic at localhost and then pass it on to the SSL backend. Example configuration: [gmail-pop3] client = yes accept = 127.0.0.1:1110 connect = pop.gmail.com:995 Then point nginx to localhost:1110 as backend and it will in fact connect to GMail's POP3 server over SSL.


1

Marko, maybe too late, but I was able to get nginx and wildfly working following your configuration, let me share that: In proxy_headers.conf: proxy_set_header Host $host; proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-Proto $scheme; add_header Front-End-Https on; In my app.conf location / { include conf.d/proxy_headers.conf; proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8080; } ...


1

(I am aware that this is not a full answer, only advise how to troubleshoot. But it helped at least in this case) Double and triple check that nginx is really not reloading, even after a restart (nginx might be stuck in an unhealthy state). It is easy to wrongly think nginx would not reload. Here is how you can verify: Note that in many default ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible