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18

Using Folder Redirection to get the "My Documents", "Desktop", and potentially "Application Data" folders out of the user's roaming user profile will help matters tremendously. I'd review this document from Microsoft: "Managing Roaming User Data Deployment Guide". It's dauntingly in-depth, but it's filled with very good information. Some people only use ...


13

Roaming user profiles are going to be painful to use via the Internet. Any significant number of files in folders (which the AppData folder is notorious for having) is going to cause painful delays in profile synchronization during logon and logoff. Due to the way profiles are copied (file for file) latency will impact this, though as long as you're using ...


12

Everything in the local user profile folder (pointed to by the environment variable %USERPROFILE%) gets synchronized with the roaming profile on the file server at logoff, except folders configured in the exclusion list. By default, the exclusion list contains (on Windows 7): $Recycle.bin AppData\Local AppData\LocalLow The list is stored in the ...


11

Yes, though its probably too time-consuming a task for a home setup. You'll want to set up your Linux box as a Samba Domain Controller Using OpenLDAP for authentication. set up your shares and user's home drives and profiles in smb.conf and in ldap */ - for apple connectivity - */ - Add in the apple schema to your ldap (you'll need to disable schema ...


8

My recollection was that starting with Windows 2000 the roaming profile client would compare the dates / times of files in the server copy of the profile with the local copy and, if the local copy was up-to-date, it would not copy the server-side file back to the client. Finding documnetation from Microsoft of this behaviour has proven impossible. (Yet ...


7

Oy... so i've gone through this before and it's not the most fun. Basically, you need to go offline for each client computer. Then copy the offline files to a safe location, and finally purge the offline folder cache (follow the instuctions linked here http://support.microsoft.com/kb/230738). Then you can copy the file back and everything should be in ...


6

You probably want the following Group Policy: Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> System -> User Profiles Delete cached copies of roaming profiles


6

The basics: Is the computer's network configured to use Active Directory DNS servers (and only them, no external ones)? Can you succesfully resolve DC names? Can you succesfully ping them? Can you access network shares on them (f.e. SYSVOL)? Also: what happens if your stop and/or uninstall Symantec Endpoint Protection?


6

You can do this via group policy: User Configuration\Administrative Templates\System\User Profiles\Exclude directories in roaming profile If you wish to exclude more than one folder, you could type, for example: cookies; application data Note: By default, profiles are stored in the "Documents and Settings\user name" folder on the local computer, where ...


5

"Too big" will depend on your network speed, users at the end of a slow WAN with GBs of documents will notice slow logons. Those in the same office as their home server should be fine. A best practice (well, not best, but better than most alternatives) is folder redirection combined with client-side caching, and ideally DFS. This is rumoured to work much ...


5

The feature you're looking for is folder redirection. This feature, on it's own or in combination with roaming user profiles (I recommend using both) will allow you to keep the largest folders of the user's profiles on the server and speed up logon times. I also recommend creating the folders and setting the permissions yourself on the destination folders. ...


5

Roaming profiles, eh? The other users' roaming profiles have likely already been loaded, which is why they can log on. Clear out some of that full disk and try again.


5

You can use ssh -t to run setup scripts, then a shell, then cleanup scripts. ssh -t allows you to run commands, but still run one or more shells in the middle and allocate a terminal properly Your setup script can include wget'ing/curl'ing/scp'ing a temporary home directory to something like $HOME/tmphome, then running a script like this to start a shell ...


5

Lots of things - it sounds like your understanding of Roaming Profiles is fairly lacking. The user registry (Which is really NTUSER.DAT) is only one half of the story. I'd suggest browsing to your roaming profiles location (The one on the server, rather than the workstation) and you'll all of the other stuff such as Application Data and maybe the Desktop etc ...


5

You can do this. Were I you, I would only do this if : You had no need for local servers, at all. Your internet connection was rock-solid.


5

Large files in the profile can make logon / logoff slow. Large numbers of small files can really, really slow down the process. If you're not seeing error messages then everything is working alright. How big are the profiles that are problematic, both in disk usage and number of files? You should probably have a look at Roaming Profiles: Best Practices ...


5

At the most basic level, A user profile is entirety of the files and directories that contain the user-specific data (a very basic way to look at it is the profile is anything and everything contained within the c:\users\username directory). A straight roaming profiles implementation will COPY the entire user profile to a system on logon and copy the ...


4

The recycle bin on a local computer only stores files that were deleted locally. A file deleted on a network drive isn't placed in a local recycle bin. In the Recycle Bin, they can look at the column (view, details) for Original Location to see where the file really was deleted from. At that point, it's up you you/them to decide what really happened. ...


4

"There are a couple of ways to configure Process Monitor to record logon operations: one is to use Sysinternals PsExec to launch it in the session 0 so that it survives the logoff and subsequent logon and another is to use the boot logging feature to capture activity from early in the boot, including the logon." I don't believe that either of the above ...


4

No, the profile format is different between Windows XP and Windows 7; you can't use a roaming profile between these two systems, even on a native Active Directory domain. More info here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc766489(WS.10).aspx.


4

What you can do is making a simple schedule task, using a tool like delprof2, that runs at the interval you want. You would would likely have to add a check to make sure you dont try to delete the profile of a user that is logged in. This being said you should take into account the much longer login time after a profile is deleted ( In terms of how often ...


4

How did you setup the profile in the first place?? Very Very important information. Otherwise, we have to ask, "Did you turn on the DC?" :) To create a roaming profile: Open Active Directory Users and Computers and connect to the Domain Controller. Or just login to the DC itself and open the AD Users and Computer Right-click the user account and then ...


4

Use the group policy setting "Do not log users on with temporary profiles", to be found in Computer Configuration -> Policies -> Administrative Templates-> System -> User Profiles.


4

This is achieved using folder redirection, where you stipulate that the my documents folder (for example) resides on a network device.


4

How'd you delete the profile? I'm betting that you just deleted the folder from C:\Users. This is the wrong way to delete a profile. Profiles should be deleted using the profile management tool that comes with Windows. In order to fix the problem that you've created, follow the steps in this KB article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/947242


4

First, there's nothing wrong with using roaming profiles so long as they're implemented correctly. Just because they're an older concept doesn't make them any less useful or valid in today's IT environment. Roaming profiles were not designed with the intention of one user per PC and one PC per user, they were designed for your exact use case, one or many ...


4

...even if it means that their data is still coming in when they reach their desktop This is referred to as profile streaming. It is implemented in third-party profile management products only, namely Citrix Profile Management, RTO Virtual Profiles (bought by VMware and currently not available) and Appsense Environment Manager. The only one of these ...


4

My first suggestion would be to disable or remove all Symantec components on one client machine and see if that resolves the problem.


4

Designing roaming profiles is a complex task. The following article tries to give an overview: User Profile Design: A Primer The links at the end lead to articles that go into additional detail.


4

If you have access to the user's machine, go to System Properties -> Advanced -> User profiles; there you will see if it's a local or roaming profile. You can also have a look at the user's profile settings in Active Directory (they are in the user account's properties).



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