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6

rootfs is a special tempfs image used in initram, and stays in this instance because you have an encrypted LVM setup. Normally, init would overwrite rootfs with the actual mounted / file system, but Fedora may not have that fixed with your setup. There is no harm in it. see: http://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/filesystems/ramfs-rootfs-initramfs.txt


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There are multiple entries for / in /proc/mounts, and the second entry shows information about your real root filesystem (note the ro flag there): /dev/disk/by-uuid/548b00b0-bd98-4017-9e62-5c27b633268b / ext4 ro,noatime,errors=remount-ro,data=ordered 0 0 The first entry with the rootfs filesystem type appears because the Linux kernel creates a RAM-based ...


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Most Live CDs have an option to 'Run from RAM'. You can find an incomplete list at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Linux_distributions_that_run_from_RAM Technically, other distributions can be made to boot from RAM as well (also referred to as "RAMboot", "toram" or "copy2ram").


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I hate to say it, but I don't know of an easy way to do this. It's quite probable you could make something work by creating an image file with dd, then partitioning it with fdisk, then creating a second image file with dd, and formatting it directly (or using something like genext2fs), then dd'ing the second filesystem image into the first partitioned image ...


1

Depending on why you want to avoid root access, sudo might be a solution. Write a script that does all the stuff you need to do for the task, making sure users can't misuse it with "creative" input, and then give the user in question sudo rights for exactly that script and nothing else.


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The initrd contains a gzipped cpio dump that's put onto a ramdisk during init. Setuproot loads any necessary modules (contained in the initrd), generally for things like LVM, populates /dev (the initrd contains a limited /dev). Switchroot pivots off the cpio archive to the real root filesystem. nash is extremely limited. Every binary must be static, ...


1

It's certainly possible; the only thing you need to shrink your root filesystem is another root filesystem to boot into. I don't know if a custom initrd.img will be sufficient. (It might be. I'd love to hear a way to do it.) If it were me, I'd make a minimal system installation on another partition, containing only the necessary tools. You'd reboot into ...


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I would expect you could put everything you need into your initrd, and then unmount root (I'd put everything you normally have in your initrd, plush the ssh or what ever for remote, + the fs etc tools), this way you don't risk much. The other thing is, what happens if you screw up? The added down time might make another plan a better choice, such as adding ...


1

Youre trying to boot up an init ram block device (initrd), but you havent provided an initrd to grub, so /dev/ram0 doesnt exist. Additionally initrd is old school. If youre building a new server, you should be using initramfs not initrd, and you shouldnt specify root= at all, it is taken care of automatically. If youre not using and initrd or initramfs, ...


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The right thing to do is to first figure out which partition is mounted. Then you'll need to deactivate the other one so you can remove the disk from it. And then grow the mounted disk under mdadm to add the new disk to it, and the md software will sync the currently mounted partition to the other disk. After that cat'ing /proc/mdstat should show only a ...



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