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0

I've searched everywhere on the Internet to no avail for the right solution to this problem, until I got here. After running the OpenVPN GUI with elevated administrative access, the problem was solved. Just running the application as administrator got everything right. Thank you for sharing your experience.


0

I don't know Tomato, but just plugging them into each other won't work, not without adding custom routes and IP aliases. Your PC will get a 'default' route to the gateway of 192.168.3.0/24 (probably 192.168.3.1 or 254 or something). Anything that doesn't match 192.168.3.* will be sent to the router, which will probably not do anything with it, because it's ...


1

I've had a similar problem... BT's my ISP, my router is a Draytek 2820 and is TX and RX packets, I can access google.co.uk and search on wired and wifi connected devices, on none can I access any other websites. Issue across whole network, happens around 11am each morning for the last week. It's killing VOIP, gmail etc, everything bar google. I can ...


2

Q: Can a site get my router mac address? A: No.


0

On typical Ethernet networks, technically, you could do static arp entries (if all devices supported it) and not require any ARP traffic, but this is definitely not a common practice. Is there a chance their router is configured to not respond to ping?


1

Definitely not, without ARP you'll have no IP link so it's important to have working - and the fact that it works on other equipment means you're getting ARP replies from them in some cases (so it can't be disabled). More likely is either a hardware or configuration problem on the new router that's preventing it from getting a working layer 2 connection to ...


0

So, I feel kind of stupid now but I'll share the solution with the rest of the class. It turns out that the network team we had setup on the Server was the issue. Our switch isn't load balancing and that apparently caused the connection to the server to be unstable in our new building and unreachable in our old building. So we disabled the network team and ...


0

For enp2s2f1, Change: TYPE="Bridge" To: TYPE="Ethernet" Unless you want enp2s2f1 to be part of a bridge. If so, follow the RHEL 7 instructions.


2

The ISP also has a DHCP server, just like your router. The DHCP server may have your old address cached like previous answers posted, and may give you a new address if not. DHCP sometimes runs directly over your uplink, and sometimes it is terminated at the network equipment that runs the uplinks. In bridged mode, for example, DHCP is used to assign the ...


0

Schemes vary, but in the most common scheme, the ISP keeps track of which IP addresses it has assigned and which are available. When a customer establishes a connection, they assign them the same IP they assigned them last time they connected if it's still available. If that fails, they're assigned an IP address known to be suitable and unused.


8

(Here I'm talking about the customer edge router. The one which is on your LAN. In the ISP network, the router is usually/probably configured manually). If you have a PPP-based connection (PPPoE, PPPoA, PPPoEoA), your router will receive its IP addresses from the ISP addresses: using IPCP for IPv4; using IPCPv6 and SLAAC or DHCPv6 for IPv6. If you have ...


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IANA is the organization responsible for global IP assignments. They assign "blocks" of IP addresses to Regional Internet Registries which are geographically based organizations responsible for allocation within their geographic areas -- there are 5 RIR's: AfriNIC (Africa) LACNIC (Latin America & Caribbean) APNIC (Asia Pacific) ARIN (United States, ...


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Record keeping prevents duplicates. Like you said, the ISP assigns the address to customers. Above the ISP, a numbering authority such as ARIN or RIPE assigns the ISP a block of IP addresses that it can use. So no two ISP's have the same range of addresses.


-1

An old thread I know, but I've just had to turn off the DoS defences on my Draytek 2850 home router to prevent some connection problems (almost everyone's in-bound bandwidth dropped to 0). Oddly enough, when all the kids are using their iPhones, PCs and chatting on Skype, etc. it triggers the DoS defences! We had a very similar problem on a 2930 shortly ...


0

While this is a little unconventional it should work. I've tried something similar before and did not get it to work, the PPOE server did not respond, however we had a fairly complex setup and also had firewalls in the mix. You may find the type and number of switches you have stops it working. Assuming you just have the one uplink cable between the two ...


0

Well - it sounds like you have a classic "WTF-IS-GOING-ON" situation on your hands. First thing; You mention there is a firewall but that you tried disabling it. I am assuming this is something like a Windows firewall on the server itself? Second thing; The router at the new building is handling DNS and DHCP. Does it, too, have a firewall? If so, have you ...


1

Enterprise-level products, like Cisco's, are designed and built for a professional market; as such, their customers are expected to know and undertand what they are doing and how to properly manage them. There are lots and lots of "simpler" products out there, but they are nowhere near the levels of performance, reliability and flexibility you can expect ...


1

You can accomplish this with routing. The network is so small, you might even just do static routing, but any supported routing protocols like RIP, EIGRP, OSPF, etc. would do the trick. The main points to hit on: The connection between routers should be its own subnet, such as 192.168.3.0/24, and each router's interface must have an address in the ...


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If I understand well then the new server is the only one that does not behave as it should. Did you check the IP addresses? All in the same subnet? Did you change/activate a firewall on the new server last Friday?


1

I've had the exact same problem for almost a week. Had to re-dial / reboot the server so many times manually. I just found a possible solution and it has worked fine for past hour. Log into the router as admin, Firewall >> DoS defense Setup, Unticked "Enable UDP flood defense".


0

Some more advanced router options are only accessible through telnet. You should be able to telnet your router's IP (e.g. telnet 192.168.1.1) and access those from the command line.


2

You are assuming the router is performing NAT. The router will drop the packet, or less likely send an ICMP reject code routers don't forward anything that is not "established"(outgoing/STUN) or port forwarded (firewall/uPnP). Just like if you were running Apache and IIS on the same box they can't both directly use the same port. IIS comes with a proxy ...


2

I assume your router is running NAT? Because why else would you have "port forwarding rules". If so, the packet will get dropped by the router.



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