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1

you can't block https unless you decrypt the traffic somehow. The whole packet is encrypted so the router has no idea what the host header it. It only see's the destination IP and a bunch of encrypted traffic.


0

Without narrowing your question down to specific products, this can only be answered generally. Typically, if a switch fails all devices that have a connection to that switch will lose connectivity. As for the switch being exploitable, barring any sort of bug, a properly configured device should not be exploitable by someone connected to an open "guest" ...


4

You need to disable the router to send the redirects: sudo sysctl -w ipv4.conf.eth0.send_redirects = 0 You will need to edit /etc/sysctl.conf and add the following line to apply the config at boot time. ipv4.conf.eth0.send_redirects = 0 However your config is neither optimal, nor secure. You should either use a router and split the network in 2 VLANs. ...


1

From what i know, changing BSSID is hardware related. So, unless you provide some details regarding your router, i doubt you'll get much help. Now, considering your main goal is to protect your wlan, using WPA2 with a 63 chars passphrase will do a way better job than hiding/changing SSID/BSSID.


0

Because it is extremely difficult that you have a WAN link capable of more then 100 Mb/s full duplex. Heck, basically you need to have a optical link to the home (FTTH) or some very fast VDSL+ evolution. On the other hand, having a very fast internal network is very useful. For example, file transfer between two wifi-connected PC will be much faster on a ...


2

This cannot be done using DNS directly. A domain name always resolves to a single IP address, the port isn't related to DNS records at all. However, you can set up a reverse proxy on your web server that is listening on port 443. You would set up virtual hosts server.machine.com and other.machine.com on the www.machine.com web server, which would then ...


2

Your subnet mask is undoubtedly 255.255.255.0, so that address is not on your network. If your subnet mask is 255.255.0.0, your machine wouldn't be sending traffic to it through your gateway.


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No idea what happened (I mean I'm a guy that can format re-install until he gets it right) but I managed to get DHCP and DNS servers to install and not bug me about domains or certificates or anything it's working now! Hallelujah All I can suggest is if you are having the same issues as me just make sure you don't do anything even remotely close to domain ...


0

Depends on how mean the AP is to you: 1) It might only want to see packets coming from you, with your known link layer address (and hence not of bridged packets) 2) It might actually be even smarter, and know which IP address should belong to which link layer address (cause it knows DHCP and inspects it) If 1+2 are both true, you need indeed something like ...


1

Presumably you are using PPPoE, which explains why eth1 is connected to the modem. When the PPP session is established, pppd will invoke the various scripts in the ip.up.d as you mentioned. The ifconfig commands that you show are an entirely reasonable way to set up an IP alias. The most logical reason why multiple IP addresses are used is for when ...


0

Its worth noting you have redirect methods available in almost every web programming language. For example php. header("Location: http://www.yourwebsite.com/user.php"); /* Redirect browser */ exit(); More info here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/768431/how-to-make-a-redirect-in-php


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The old school way to do this is via HTML meta refresh. # Redirect to http://example.com/ immediately: <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; url=http://example.com/"> Have a look at these docs for further reading : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meta_refresh


1

We had the same model (or same family) long time ago and it had similar symptoms before it completely died. Network traffic slowed down, and WiFi range dropped dramatically. When opened, I noticed some of the capacitors had noticeable 'bulges'. So I'm guessing the electronics inside yours is just coming to the end of its life.


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As Jason has said, the NAT does seem to be coming into play. My advice would be to try the service policy on f0/0 instead and to change the directions. This should take effect before/after NAT has occurred, which should rule out NAT as a problem. interface FastEthernet0/1 . . service-policy output DW service-policy input UP Hope this helps!


0

Because you are NATing from G0/0 to G0/1 you cannot use an access-list to allow traffic. NAT acts as a firewall so you need to use a Port-Address Translation rule. For the single port, that would look like this: ip nat inside source static udp x.x.x.x 5060 interface g0/0 5060 The port range is a bit more tricky, as IOS doesn't usually deal with port ...


0

@Stuart I am working on similar project at the moment I am experiencing similar problems with the setup. Initially we used bonded DSL connection with Sharedband routers which despite ISP claims that 'there are no ports blocked', APs connected were not obtaining DHCP and failing to talk to controller. It was due to blocking TR-068 layer. We managed to solve ...



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