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You could clear the previous key with the following command. cisco(config)# crypto key zeroize rsa Then sanitise the vty lines. Simple SSH Config cisco(config)# hostname cisco(config)# ip domain-name cisco(config)# crypto key generate rsa cisco(config)# ip ssh version 2


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Your config is correct to send 993 destined to your WAN IP to 10.0.1.2 port 993. Go through the troubleshooting steps. You can eliminate at least common problems 1, 6, 7, and 10-14 and probably more than that. https://doc.pfsense.org/index.php/Port_Forward_Troubleshooting First I'd filter Diag>States for :993 when trying to connect from the Internet, and ...


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You're close. Your second line should be server= instead. address=/#/127.0.0.1 server=/google.com/# Whereas address means "Resolve this domain and its subdomains as this address", server means "Ask this nameserver to resolve this domain and its subdomains." The server directive supports # in the second position to mean "the default upstream server". ...


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Frankly, I'm a bit worried that someone managing 100+ computers would ask such a question here. Consider getting professional support. To answer your question: You can configure them anyway you like, it really depends what you are trying to achieve. For example, if you are running an Active Directory on your Windows Server, then the computers within the AD ...


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This is a typical beginning of each failure story in deploying ASA. Someone decides he needs ASA instead of the router and starts to use it like router. But ASA isn't quite a router, it's a security appliance. It's not intended to be used instead of the router, it's intended to be used with a router. The fact that it's capable of doing some of the router's ...


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So, if I understand you correctly, the WiFi router gets the internet, and then sends it to the switch. Where is the cable plugged in on the switch? Is it one of the standard ports? Or is it isolated/says something like "internet" on it? If it's the latter, plug it into one of the main ports that you would expect to get internet from. You can also go into ...


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Connect an Ethernet cable directly to your router, If the router is set to use DHCP, wait to get an IP on your computer, then open CMD and type ipconfig You will see the IP, Subnet and Default Gateway IP If you router is not using DHCP, assign the same IP range to your NIC (Same IP as your Phone Ex. If your phone is using 192.168.1.27, assign 192.168.1.200 ...


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you can just visit https://www.whatismyip.com/ and the site will tell you what your external IP address is. Regards -- arl


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Yes, bridged mode + PPPoE on a pfSense box should work fine. One notable caveat to test though is that some ISPs who use PPPoE have an MTU blackhole and don't set PPP MTU (some Cisco client equipment fails to negotiate the PPP session if the far end tries to set MTU) and also don't themselves clamp TCP MSS to work around this. Setting your PPP MTU manually ...


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I probably misunderstood something but to set static IP you do not need to disable DHCP from the router. Add to the server as many ipv4 ip as you want by going to its advanced settings. I do not even think you'd need to have groups, I'd only use 1 lan for everything (since a router is not a firewall, so I'd not push it too far). Your server would have all ...


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The feature you are looking for is "policy based routing" (PBR), so you have to find a router that support it. Product recommendation is off-topic here, but among the various options, you can use a free network OS like VyOs It runs on any x64 platform.


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If you are using Windows Open network connections Open settings of VPN connection Go to Networking TAB Go to TCP/IP - Settings In Advanced disable: Use default gateway on remote network.


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Do you know the device's manufacturer? If so, you may be able to get part of the MAC. http://aruljohn.com/mac.pl The only other thing I can think of is vxlan but I'm sure it would be more difficult to set that up than to just get access to the router which would have the MAC directly. https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7348


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i don't know about router but if you have ip address you can use nmap to obtain mac address even in your local host you can do it as well so why the hell are you want obtain that from router or some thing like that ? if your os is linux you can use macchanger or lots of other apps so i have no idia why you want do this like that.


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If your setup is Modem --> Tap --> Router --> Devices Then all you should see is the Public IP because the NAT will take place in the router.


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On the WAN side of your router, only public addresses exist. The router is performing NAT. You will need to tap on the LAN side of your router to see private IP addresses since the router changes the source addresses of the packets as they travel from LAN to WAN.


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The use of OpenVPN is a requirement for your environment? if not you can try the VPC Peering. A VPC peering connection is a networking connection between two VPCs that enables you to route traffic between them using private IP addresses. Instances in either VPC can communicate with each other as if they are within the same network. You can create a VPC ...



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