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This answer uses the following assumptions: None of the IP addresses in the network 10.0.0.0/16 are in use anywhere in the existing enterprise. The red lines on the diagram indicate point-to-point connections terminated by serial interfaces on the routers that are connected by red lines. You need to assign IP addresses to the six serial interfaces that are ...


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You're not supposed to have the same network configured on multiple interfaces, there's no point in it. If the two interfaces are now connected to the same thing, it's just wrong (things on one either side will think they're in a net with things on the other side, but not be able to reach them), if they are, that thing will probably just use one of the ...


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As you don't mention you added a route on the third system, I'm guessing the problem is that the third system doesn't know how to route return packets to 172.28.11.0/24. So you need to add a route there. Note that the route command has been deprecated in linux for a very long time now. You should familiarize yourself with the ip command, it is very powerful ...


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I found the problem. The gateway for 10.0.2.x was wrong. I fix it and it's working. ec2-user@ec1 ~# route Kernel IP routing table Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use Iface default ip-10-0-1-1.ec2 0.0.0.0 UG 0 0 0 eth0 10.0.1.0 * 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 ...


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The problem is now at least partly solved (I'm fine with this). I was testing the network with Windows clients in the beginning, and both PCs had got the Windows 10 upgrade lately. The problem itself was really stupid: Windows didn't response to pings since there is some new security enabled by default in Windows 10. When I added one Linux laptop to the ...


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First, your default policy in the FORWARD chain is ACCEPT, so you're not actually denying any traffic. This explains why the 20 -> 50 forwarding works. You can fix this with iptables -P FORWARD DROP. As far as the other pings, notice that in your log entries, the TTL is either 127 or 63, indicating the firewall has already made its routing decision and ...


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127.0.0.1 is your loopback. It is always local to the machine you are on. Creating a VM means it is a new machine and it has its own internal 127.0.0.1. You could create 50 VM's and they're each going to have their own internal 127.0.0.1 and no way for the computer to know which one you want. So you should only be able to get to web pages on the VM's at ...


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If there are many possible lines in routing table, kernel select one with lower METRIC. In your case, your interface eth0 have metric 100. Other interface eth1 have default metric (probably 0), so kernel select eth0.


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1800 seconds sounds like a default timeout for a Router Advertisement. My first guess would be that there is a Cisco router on the network that is configured with ipv6 nd ra suppress on the interface. In that mode the router will send out an RA when a host requests one with an RS, but doesn't refresh it regularly. A host sends an RS when bringing up the ...


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IP packets have a header field indicating the protocol that is being sent over IP. If OSPF is sent inside of an IP packet the value of this header field must be set to 89 so that the receiving party knows it's an OSPF packet in the IP packet. OSPF does not use any transport layer protocols and does not know or care about ports.



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