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5

In theory, you can do this using something called Universal Plug and Play (UPnP). In practice, it's turned off by default on most equipment, up to and including home routers, and most competent network administrators leave it that way. You'll likely need for your appliance poll a command and control service on a network that you control, or set up a proxy ...


4

This is impossible. SSH has no notion of a Host header as is present in HTTP. The best you can do is port-based routing.


4

"Relatively easy" is a difficult term, but you might set up routing tables for each of your links - one table per link, with a single default gateway use netfilter to stamp identical marks on all packets of a single stream use the ip rule table to route the packets via different routing tables depending on the mark use a multi-nexthop weighted route to ...


4

Your hosting provider (Hetzner, at a guess?) is correct. You will need to assign the single static IP address to your VMware server's VMK interface. This will allow you to connect to the server via the VMware console and create VMs. Your hosting provider should be able to route your /29 subnet to the server's MAC address. You will also have a single ...


3

Check that your VMs have ip addresses on 10.x.x.x/24 (netmask 255.255.255.0) Set 10.x.x.11 (br0 ip address) as the default gateway of your VMs Enable ip forwarding on the physical host Enable SNAT with: iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s 10.x.x.x/24 -o eth1 -j SNAT --to y.y.y.102


3

This is by design, the entire 127.X.X.X address range is reserved for loopback, as defined in RFC1700: http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1700.txt This is discussed a little more here: why is loopback IP address from 127.0.0.1 to 127.255.255.254? Just because MPLS uses it internally (For whatever reason), that doesn't mean a target server can listen on it and ...


3

Depends on your budget, but I'd pick up a few Cisco ASA 5505 or 5506-x units at ~$550 each. Industry standard, reasonably easy to configure and no babysitting. If you have dynamic IPs at any of the locations, maybe a Cisco Meraki unit with Auto-VPN functionality. Substitute Cisco with Juniper, Sonicwall, whatever. But I don't advocate homebrew ...


2

It really all boil down on the amount of internet bandwidth you have and how much of it you want be able to use for your VPNs. Even low end firewalls (under 500/600 euros) are capable of 50+ Mb/s of AES128 encrypted bandwidth (es: Sonicwall SOHO serie). For a even lower price (maintaining good performance) you can use Mikrotik's firewall. If easy ...


2

According to nixCraft: Genmask : The netmask for the destination net; 255.255.255.255 for a host destination and 0.0.0.0 for the default route. It's called 'genmask' because it shows the 'generality' (i.e. the netmask) of the route.


1

No, the AWS DNS servers will return the public hostnames for the instances in the remote region. Your only recourse is to set up internal dns servers for this purpose.


1

iptables -t nat -I POSTROUTING -s 10.x.x.x/24 ! -d 10.x.x.x/24 -j SNAT --to-source y.y.y.102 this must be changed to iptables -t nat -I POSTROUTING --out-interface eth1 -j SNAT --to-source y.y.y.102 According to your first rule, only packages with destination to 10.x.x.x must be processed. So, what about traffic from outside to your network? (source ...


1

I've found out the answer myself: You don't actually need to specify the default gateway - you can use the catch-all of 0.0.0.0 and then specify the interface number instead (the docs do not make this obvious!): Find the interface number of the VPN by running "route print" from the command prompt and use this for the IF argument in the command below. Add ...


1

You don't say what VPN software you are using. This comes down to a routing issue. Here's something to get you started from the Linux Advanced Routing and Traffic Control Howto: http://lartc.org/howto/lartc.rpdb.multiple-links.html Under OpenVPN, you can do this on the client side or server side. On the client: redirect-gateway def1 allow-pull-fqdn ...


1

First of all, your appliance need to support IPv6. There might only be a small percentage of IPv6 users today. But if you expect those appliances to be used for five years before being scraped, then you can expect them to handle more IPv6 traffic in their lifetime than IPv4 traffic. Any real solution to your challenge involves IPv6. Everything else is just ...


1

MAC addresses reside and operate at Layer 2 of the OSI networking model. Routing occurs at Layer 3 of the OSI networking model. In the strictest sense, routing isn't performed by way of the MAC address, because routing occurs at Layer 3 while MAC addresses operate at Layer 2. That being said, and using a very simple example, when a local host needs to ...


1

Solved: I put the following commands, I missed one. iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -s 172.19.128.248 -j DNAT --to-destination 192.168.200.202 iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -s 192.168.200.202 -j DNAT --to-destination 172.19.128.248 iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -p tcp -j SNAT --to-source 172.19.128.237



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