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--no-owner may or may not do what you want, depending on whether dest exists or needs to be updated. This is the negated version of --owner, which is described by the man page as: This option causes rsync to set the owner of the destination file to be the same as the source file, but only if the receiving rsync is being run as the super-user (see also ...


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Create a separate config file for this host cp /etc/rsnapshot.conf /etc/rsnapshot.link.conf Only add the directories where you want the symlinks to be copies and remove all of the other backup definitions. add: rsync_long_args --copy-links near the cmd_rsync /usr/bin/rsync line. and invoke like: rsnapshot -c /etc/rsnapshot.link.conf daily ...


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you simply have to authorize your IAM user to access to the buvket, within the S3 bucket policy, like so: { "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "whatever", "Effect": "Allow", "Principal": { "AWS": [ "<ARN OF YOUR IAM USER>" ] ...


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That's how rsync does its thing. It writes the file to a temporary location (starting with a dot) and then when the file is completely written, it renames it to the final location. It needs to keep the original file around because how rsync's algorithm works -- it reads chunks of the original file and interleaves them with changed data sent over the ...


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Short answer: the culprit was the way we deleted old backup directories, namely rsyncing an empty directory. Now we use: find "${old?}" -delete This is also fast and avoids the problem. Longer answer: in fact, the runs which took exceptionally long occurred absolutely deterministic. We always keep a number of, say n, backups and delete the oldest one ...


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You don't have write access to the /var/www/html on the destination server, since the folder belongs to root and everybody else only has read/execute rights. The best way to fix this is changing the owner of that directory to your ssh user: chown -R developer. /var/www/html This changes the owner of /var/www/html and all its subdirectories to the ...


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You need --existing too: rsync -r --delete --existing --ignore-existing /home/gallery/images /home/gallery/thumbs From the manpage: --existing, --ignore-non-existing This tells rsync to skip creating files (including directories) that do not exist yet on the destination. If this option is combined with the ...


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Don't pass the --owner flag to your invocation of rsync. Note that --owner is implied by --all, so if you're using that option, you'll need to specify --no-owner to turn off that behaviour.



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