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Sure. You can use something similar to: rsync -av --delete <src> <dst> to replicate src to dst. The first copy will be slow (all data must be copied), but successive ones will be much faster (only modified/added files will be copied). Using the --delete switch tell rsync to delete files which are not in src anymore; using it, you should be ...


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As an alternative, consider putting the folder under version control with SVN (if it's a lot of binary files, I recommend against Git). SVN has a lot of advantages over rsync and a few downsides: SVN handles binary files very well, sending only compressed deltas across the wire Everything is versioned, so accidental deletes can be undone Very efficient ...


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As has already been noted rsync can be used to make your backups. If you already have a backup, rsync can be used to apply the incremental changes. It also has features to save changes so you have historical backups using the --backup and related flags. There are a number of backup solutions built on top of the rsync protocol designed to keep historical ...


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I have found the problem. From server 1 I was using scp /storage/somefile root@server2domain:/storage instead of using the ip. The weird thing is that it worked for over 6 months and it stopped working yesterday out of the blue.


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When you say "mainly 15Mb tarballs", how many smaller files are there? Do you see the slow rate constantly or does it look faster on the larger files? rsync (and almost any other filesystem operation) is slower at processing many small files rather than fewer large ones due to the filesystem overhead of opening and closing each file (and any directory read/...



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