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2

Use --inplace The --inplace argument instructs rsync not to upload the new file as a temporary file first. This may be risky as a network problem // disconnect may put the dest file in a weird state.


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There were a few efficiencies to be made to this script: On my system at least, the perl buffer reads are 8k, so use 8192 block size. autoflush so the local end doesn't block until the remote output buffer is 'full', as we are feeding lzop the buffering seems pointless. ssh -i /root/.ssh/rsync_rsa $remote " perl -'MDigest::MD5 md5' -ne ...


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Make sure the lines in the /path/to/list.lst do not have blank spaces at the end of the line. I don't know why rsync is so sensitive to that.


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The exclude should look like this foo & the rsync CMD should look like this rsync -a --exclude-from=exclude.filter /home /dest Hope this was helpful.


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One possible solution is described in the following web page. It looks like that error line is misleading, check the "code" error that comes latter. http://kenfallon.com/rsync-mkstemp-failed-no-such-file-or-directory-2/ https://access.redhat.com/solutions/60592 I have similar problem with "(code 23)" but I am still don't know why or how to fix it. If I ...


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The thing you need to think about is how up to date you need both devices to be. The nearer you get to 'real time' sync, the more difficult and expensive it gets. Fully synchronous replication options exist, but they're bandwidth intensive and very sensitive to network latency. I wouldn't normally suggest doing that on sites that are geographically ...


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DRBD is more or less a RAID1 implementation for block device replication over networks and does sync in real-time. For high latency/low bandwidth communication using a indirect setup using DRBD proxy is recommend. When using DRBD over high latency, possible instable WAN connection, a active/passive (called primary/secondary in DRBD) setup is highly ...


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Have you tried without /* ? Please try the below command. You are missing / at the end. rsync --delete /src-dirname/ /dest-dirname Let us know if this worked too


6

RAID is definitely not your answer. RAID is generally for drives being used in an array in the same physical location. If you want to sync file systems across continents, then you need to use a NAS product that has some form of live mirroring capability. Most enterprise-class SAN/NAS products have this feature. Otherwise, something like lsyncd or even a ...


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Last version (at least 3.1.1) of rsync allows you to specify the "remote ownership": --usermap=tom:www-data Changes tom ownership to www-data (aka PHP/Nginx). If you are using Mac as the client, use brew to upgrade to the last version. And on your server, download archives sources, then "make" it!


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Since this question was last answered, there is a new AWS command line tool, aws. It can sync, rsync-like, between local storage and s3. Example usage: aws s3 sync s3://mybucket /some/local/dir/


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You can make use of Bash globopt (**) to match each file recursively, as described in this post. Since you're only invoking rsync only once, it should be much faster than other approaches where you invoke a command for each file (like find ... -exec).


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You could run rsync with -e "ssh -C" thereby compressing the ssh tunnel instead of only the data as it does when running with -z. Or connecting thought a vpn which compresses the traffic (openvpn can do this).


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It's unrecommended for most cases, but given that your goal is to reduce the difference calculation bandwidth, it's appropriate. Consider the following script flow: touch a file to be your "high bar", this needs to be systematically named and not overwrite your last "high bar", which is now your "low bar". The script will transfer anything with mtime ...


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For each run rsync needs to establish a complete listing of both the local and remote directory structure and compute the differences, before it has determined which files are newly created and sending those new files over. That is what is "expensive". You haven't mentioned what the OS of the file-server is, but on Linux you can use something like ...


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Rsync is often not be the best tool to facilitate promoting code from development into production. If your developers are shipping compiled code, they would benefit from a workflow to build-test-package-deploy, and you can empower them by setting up a repository and a workflow engine to do this. If they are simply pushing scripts, they can probably use ...


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Rsync? Sure, that will get the job done. But it's like using a hammer to drive in screws. If you're pushing code, use a proper repository tool. There are plenty out there, and if the code isn't compiled, a Git client on the box or a post-commit hook would work fine. Remember, don't simply solve today's problem, make sure your solution is scalable enough to ...



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