Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

If you just want one extension, in one directory, why not just use regular globbing? rsync /home/you/rsync_this/*.jpg user@server:/remote/folder/


0

-a option includes -r (recursive) option. Regarding man : -a, --archive This is equivalent to -rlptgoD. It is a quick way of saying you want recursion and want to preserve almost everything (with -H being a notable omission). The only exception to the above equivalence is when --files-from is specified, in which case -r is not implied. So, from now, ...


0

Use the -n flag, combined with the -c checksum flag and the -i flag: # rsync -naic test/ test-clone/ >fcst...... a.txt >fcst...... abcde.txt >fcst...... b.txt In this example, only one file has changed, based on the contents of the file itself. However, no file syncing is done because of the -n flag Bonus If you want to run chown on the changed ...


1

You can use rsync's --itemize-changes (-i) option to generate a parsable output that looks like this: ~ $ rsync src/ dest/ -ai .d..t.... ./ >f+++++++ newfile >f..t.... oldfile ~ $ echo 'new stuff' > src/newfile ~ $ !rsync rsync src/ dest/ -ai >f.st.... newfile The > character in the first position indicates a file was updated, the ...


0

From the rsync manual: rsync -avz foo:src/bar /data/tmp This would recursively transfer all files from the directory src/bar on the machine foo into the /data/tmp/bar directory on the local machine. The files are transferred in "archive" mode, which ensures that sym‐ bolic links, devices, attributes, permissions, ownerships, etc. are preserved ...


4

That is a terrible approach. An IMAP daemon expects to have full control over its file system structure and manually circumventing this is never a good idea. Try do use IMAP ACLs instead and allow everyone to read/write a common shared folder and designate this as the sent folder for your MUAs. To make this clear: This approach is not about syncing. With a ...


0

a tested complete command is like this: rsync -av --delete -e "ssh -o ProxyCommand='ssh -l username -W %h:%p jumphost-ip'" ./source_path/ username@internal-ip:/dest_path/


2

This doesn't look like something you should be rsyncing to/from an ESXi host. VMware is NOT a general-purpose operating system and the use of rsync is not supported. Hence the fact that you had to compile a static version of the utility. Can you find another approach to move/copy the data you have? If this is for backups, you really should be using ...


1

Note: the following is all going off theory -- the real right way to make sure this is correct in your situation is to run tests on various combinations of options. The data connections in an rsync operation look something like this: Source disk <-> rsync instance <-> other rsync instance <-> destination disk In general, rsync is ...


1

You can mount your destination folder from your windows system as a drive in the Ubuntu system and use rsync to achieve your goal: rsync -rtv source_folder/ destination_folder/ In the source_folder notice that I added a slash at the end, doing this prevents a new folder from being created, if we don't add the slash, a new folder named as the source folder ...


0

Sadly --exclude applies to the source side, not the destination (as you said). My best recommendation is to move the data you want to keep outside of the destination area. For example, instead of /home/virtual use /keep/virtual


0

I gave up. A work around was to run apache as john:www-data. The rsync copies new files to the destination as john, but apache can read them fine as running as john:www-data. [...] <IfModule mpm_itk_module> AssignUserId john www-data </IfModule> [...]


0

The quickest way to solve this is to reverse into Windows. If you rsync on Ubuntu from Windows you should be able to set permissions there.


1

If you are using a cygwin version of rsync then you probably should be able to use the /cygdrive/ folder. A drive with the letter D would be seen in cygwin as /cygdrive/d.


0

You should check everything on both sides of your backuppc config. first, check the server and try to increase it performance, but if you have other machines that perform better, lets skip this one. Next check the network! Network speed detected by the desktop, package size, cable quality. do some benchmarks, do a rsync (rsync-rsyncd) test of a big file. ...


1

checksum is also useful if you have been using another system to sync files, that has not preserved timestamps. Checksum will only tranfer files that are different AND update all the timestamps on the receiving end so that they match


1

It may be faster to run rsync directly on the server. You have about a million files to access over the network. There are a couple of minimal installs of rsync that you can run. I've setup BackupPC on Windows this way. You can run a full Cygwin install, or the minimal cygwin-rsycnd install available in the BackupPC project.


1

You should read BashFAQ/050 aka I'm trying to put a command in a variable, but the complex cases always fail!. A TL;DR: This fails because [...] the [...] quotes inside the variable are literal; not syntactical. Word splitting is also a problem when trying to store a command in a variable. Although not with your immediate example this is something one ...


0

diff -r actually works quite well. If you just want to know if the files differ, not the actual contents of the differences, then do diff -qr



Top 50 recent answers are included