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First, the direct answer: Per the official rsync documentation, I can't find an explicit answer; it depends upon interpretation. However, I believe you're not seeing the correct behaviour. At any rate, I do have a recommendation. Per http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/17204/six-simple-tips-to-get-reputation-fast-on-any-stack-exchange-site, ...


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If you don’t have the latest rsync (e.g., OS X has 2.6.9) and can’t use --info=progress2, here’s another alternative to save yourself from pages of scrolling text on progress: rsync -aPh <source> <destination> | xargs -L1 printf "\33[2K\rTransferring: %s" That will print out, on one line, the name of the latest file being transferred: ...


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As simple as: #!/bin/bash echo ----Starting Backup---- echo Start Time: $(date +%m-%d-%Y) $(date +%H-%M) echo ------------------------ echo Deleting if older than 7 days echo ------------------------ find /var/application/application-data/exports/*.zip -mtime +7 -exec rm {} \; echo ------------------------ echo Sending to AppDataBkp echo ...


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My help would be to use -delete instead of the exec rm ...


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I want to sync files from serverA to serverB, but there's no direct connection between them, but I have serverC that can access both serverA and serverB. what worked for me is: on serverC: ssh user@serverA 'rsync -avP -e "ssh -ax user@serverC ssh " /source/files user@serverB:/des/tination'


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It takes that long for rsync just to analyze that many files, even though the transfer is efficient. It has to do in excess of 15M IOs, plus or minus caching. You could throw very fast storage at it, but that can be costly. The zfs suggestion is to use block level copies in which this becomes one giant file to transfer. The concepts also apply to lvm, ...


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I've got 3.1.1 under fedora 22. The requisite config files for rsyncd are in the rsync-daemon package. I've listed the files in each package below. I'd just install the extra package. But, I did notice a typo in your config file ... Change: EnvironmentFile=-/etc/sysconfig/rsyncd Into: EnvironmentFile=/etc/sysconfig/rsyncd Here's a list of files ...


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I opted for doing a first dd and then use rsync in order to update the backup. The dd does a perfect copy of the system including fstab as well as the boot stuff. Rsync will keep the copy updated and include the mounted drives. dd if=/dev/sdb of=/dev/sdg bs=4M Replace source and destination drives accordingly. The rsync procedure will be exactly the same ...


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Preface: Backups should always be offsite offline/read-only redundant. If you just use an external hard disk connected eg. via USB, you dramatically reduce the amount of protection your backup can offer against catastrophic damage like theft, fire, flooding etc. user and or software error leading to deleted data on connected drives, inlcuding your ...


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To cite from the rsync manual section FILTER RULES: [..] the first matching pattern is acted on: if it is an exclude pattern, then that file is skipped; if it is an include pattern then that filename is not skipped; if no matching pattern is found, then the filename is not skipped. Thus, it might be your best option to read your filter rules from ...


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Yes, however have these two considerations present: from freedup page "There are neither warranties nor guarantees for freedup working correctly" make sure to use --links as parameter for rsync, and not --copy-links or -a because (again from freedup page): "If hardlinking is not possible soft links are tried, except one of the paths is not starting at root ...


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rsync -a --exclude "__pycache__/" source/ destination/ You may also want to pass --delete-excluded to remove __pycache__ files that have been copied (of course it removes all other excluded files from the destination too too).



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