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This error doesn't affect the health of the drive itself. If you will move the drive to another chassis that doesn't have the link problem the drive will be fine. That is assuming that the link problems do not originate from the drive port itself. These errors mean that there is a problem in the link between the drive and the upstream port, if you have a ...


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If the disks you're using are not HP drives and you're using a Gen8 ProLiant server, there's no guarantee that the disks will be recognized or will even work reliably. Your best option is to use actual HP branded/supported drives in the server. See: Third-party SSD solutions in ProLiant Gen8 servers


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Yes, you usually can connect more disks than the number of ports in your controller (see the other answer's link for information on what an 'expander' is). Of course, the performance will be limited to what those 4/8 ports can support. For instance, check the Supermicro SC418 chassis. The backplane does not have 24 ports but a complex backplane that will ...


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This depends on your server, the backplane and whether an expander is involved. If you are connecting to the disks without a backplane or expander solution, you will need the 8i card and SAS breakout cables. Edit: You don't have an expander backplane, so you'll need an 8i (2 x SFF-8087 ports) controller and two SAS breakout cables. Please see: How ...


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Normally you'd use your hardware warranty to exchange failed and pre-failed disks. This can come in the form of the server chassis warranty (HP/Dell, etc.) or even just the manufacturer's warranty.


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Yes and no... Think about this: Your disks will not perform at 6Gbps (unless they're SSDs). So some level of oversubscription is okay when you go to using a SAS expander. A more common scenario is the use of an external JBOD storage enclosure. Those usually have 1 or 2 x 4-lane SAS connectors linking them to the main server. Let's assume 4 x 6Gbps, so ...


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If performing a low-level format on a 4TB drive takes 16 hours, it's formatting at a rate 70MB/s. That's comparable to the 100MB/s at which you say you can normally write to the drive.


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It's a hard disk with a FC interface. Nope, you probably can't just arbitrarily replace one of them with a disk with a different interface, and different IO characteristics, especially in a storage array. But ask your vendor to be certain, or consult their documentation! And, spend 30 seconds on Google, too.


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Some common methods, you have to see what your model supports: Export all drives as JBOD. You'll end up with n drives you can wipe separately. Export them as RAIDx with max capacity, again without a spare. If you see a drive with the expected capacity in the OS, wiping this should also destroy all data. See if the controller offers a specific feature ...


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Without knowing what this enclosure was connected so, I'm going to make some assumptions. If you were connected to a RAID controller, just delete the logical drives/virtual drives/RAID groups. That's usually good enough. Your RAID controller may also have an option to wipe the drives. Also, SAS-to-USB adapters don't exist. Otherwise, this is too much ...



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