Hot answers tagged

33

In the SATA specification this is referred to as hot plug and hot removal and they are two separate events. While the electrical and communication layers support both hot plug and hot removal, check that your drive controller, operating system, and drivers support them. Note that all of the below ONLY applies to host and devices (ie, drive controllers and ...


6

If you use the built-in SATA ports, you'll be limited to 2TB by the Intel 5000X chipset. You could put a SATA or SAS PCIe card in the server that supports larger drives.


6

What's the real goal here? If you're just trying to get a pair of disks separate from the main drive array, why not use a PCIe SSD? Otherwise, you're butchering perfectly good and serviceable equipment and increasing the risk profile of the system by making bad modifications. The other approach to get a system drive or space out of an HP Smart Array is to ...


5

Some operating systems and file systems have 2TB limits. Some BIOS also have limitations as to how large of a drive they can detect. So yes it is absolutely possible that it won't work. If this is a Windows machine then the following article is useful: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2581408 More than likely the drive will work. It's likely that ...


5

That particular RAID controller claims 8-lane PCI Express 2.0 compliancy meaning that effectively you'll already be limited to 8 * 4 Gbs = 32 Gbs (or 4000 MB/s) regardless of what's connected to the RAID card. Each SAS SFF8088 connector will cary 4 SAS lanes over a single cable, when each link is at the maximum 6 Gbs port speed theoretically you indeed get ...


5

Brands and specific models of the equipment involved are ALWAYS appreciated. However, you'll be fine. The SATA 3.0 protocol is backward compatible with previous generations. The drives will link at their respective disk/backplane speeds.


4

I can't believe nobody mentioned AHCI yet... your SATA controller has to be in AHCI mode to enable hot swap. Check this by looking at the driver you are using: root@peter:~ # find /sys -name sdk /sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:11.0/ata5/host4/target4:0:0/4:0:0:0/block /sdk /sys/block/sdk /sys/class/block/sdk root@peter:~ # readlink ...


4

It is theoretically best to connect the power cable to the hard drive to allow the hard drive the brief second to initialize, but this is seriously only a brief 'moment'. If you look at the power connectors on a SATA 15-pin power cable and on the 7-pin data connector you will notice that some of the traces extend out slightly, this allows the powered ...


4

SATA/SAS are not like hubs, rather they work much like a network switch. This means that a single SATA/SAS port provides the entire advertised banwdwith, independetly from the other ports. In other words, a chipset providing 4x SATA 3.0 ports (6 Gb/s each) has a "SATA backplane" switching capability of 4x6 Gb/s = 24 Gb/s. For a 4x SAS 3.0 ports (12 Gb/s ...


3

This question would get more answer and attention on superuser's section. For your question, I would follow the manual from your motherboard (asrock). Usually the harddrive will warn up when you plug it, thus it's more logic to plug the Ac before, and after the data cable, but honestly I don't think there is a order, as hdd caddy do plug them at the same ...


3

Don't do it. There's no reason to pursue trying to convert an 11 year-old server to SATA. There's absolutely no upside to it. The backplane is not required to power the server on, though.


3

Based on my experience with similar controllers like Smart Array P420i from ProLiant ML350p Gen8 or ServeRAID M5015 SAS/SATA Controller from IBM x3560 M3 I'd say: 6Gbps per mini-SAS (i.e. 12Gbps) - best possible scenario. I have not tested two SFF8088 ports, only one, and I've hit 6 gbps limit.


3

I was able to get this to work on my Western Digital WD20EURS. After piecing together tips from all over google, I was able to get a master password, research the commands of hdparm, and use your example in your original question to resolve my issue. Maybe this will help with you too. First off, I found a list of master passwords for various brands of ...


3

It's going to share the SATA controller's bandwidth while in reading or writing from the optical drive, but since you don't plan on using the disk often I don't see how this would have a measurable impact on performance. Older IDE systems could slow down to the slowest item on the bus, so this is probably why you remember not putting optical and storage on ...


2

will be speed doubled? Yes, No, Maybe - anywhere in between - it entirely depends on the actual configuration and the nature of the use case. In real terms yes you should see some benefit but the only way to know is to test it as you need.


2

Some RAID cards can connect non-disk devices, but the 9500 does not support removable media devices. The 9500 has two completely separate interfaces, one to its disk and one to the host. The host interface provides only disk-like devices. It has no ability to provide a different interface to the host.


2

No, you can't just use any SSD in that model server. The Smart Array P410 array controller is a little sensitive, but will work with most SSDs. For others, it may not recognize the disks or will show error lights or even cause the system fan speeds to increase (because of misread SSD temperature sensors). Being more specific about which SSDs you'd like to ...


2

You'll probably get a 6Gbps link speed or a 3Gbps link speed, depending on the server, backplane and controller. A modern SATA SSD will likely be a 6Gbps device. But disk and storage speed isn't just about raw sequential I/O performance. The benefit of an SSD will be random I/O performance, which you're more likely to be impacted by.


2

Probably not. While there is nothing preventing you from hooking a SATA device other than an optical drive up to the SATA port for the optical drive, the engineering of your 1U server is so tight that there's nowhere to physically mount the drive. Unless you can find a hard drive or SSD that has the same physical form factor as the slim line OD, you'll ...


2

Use HP SAS disks with Smart Array P410 RAID controllers. SATA drives will downshift speed to 3.0Gbps on that controller. You can have monitoring and fan speed problems with random SATA disks on that controller. 2.5" SATA drives aren't particularly low cost or high capacity. HP SAS drives are available in 146, 300, 450, 600, 900 and 1200GB capacities and ...


2

Try using the master password to secure-erase the disk. Performing a secure erase will reset the user password. You can find lists of default master passwords by vendor through google searches. For example, this web site may be useful: https://ipv5.wordpress.com/2008/04/14/list-of-hard-disk-ata-master-passwords/


2

What you server experiences is basically a SATA renegotiation at a lower link speed after some problem communicating with the drives. These factors can be at work here (ordered by probability) very high-latency IOPS operations (eg: caused by SSD controller's garbage collection) resulting in SATA command timeout. Do your drive supports SATA Trim command? ...


2

According to Supermicro Support the board is defect: Qoute: This board may need ECO 16238 update.


1

I measured similar performance on a DL360G6, HBA SAS 9212-4i4e controller (JBOD) and 12x 3TB ZFS system. I never saw throughput higher than 400 MB/sec. Keep in mind that the MSA60 is quite old (10y+)


1

You need to run the HP Smart Storage Administrator utility to create a logical drive on your physical hard disk. Otherwise, you won't be able to see the disks in your operating system. Please read HP's detailed instructions on how to configure the RAID on an HP ProLiant ML10v2 server.


1

Modern HDD drives have a specific SATA command to limit the number of LBAs/sectors reported to the BIOS/OS. Can you issue smartctl <disk> and hdparm <disk> -N ? However, pay attention to not insert a numeric value after hdparm -N, and be sure to read the Host protected area section of hdparm manpage


1

It is 6 Gb/s per port, with 8 ports you can get up to 48 Gb/s total. For SAS controllers and disks, you can use "SAS Expanders" to connect one SAS port to multiple drives. In this case, all drives connected to one SAS port share the total 6 Gb/s bandwidth. For this reason, for maximum performance we avoid SAS expanders and use controllers like the LSI ...


1

Given that a single sata port is 600MB/s and each PCIe lane can only carry 250MB/s (2.0) or 500MB/s (3.0) its unlikely that anyone would design such a bottlenecked raid card for enterprise.


1

I realize this post is old (Linux now lumps IDE/PATA drives in with /dev/sd?) but the easiest way to do this nowadays is sudo hdparm -I /dev/sd? | grep 'sd.\|ATA' Which gives the following output for a system with one SATA and one PATA drive: /dev/sda: ATA device, with non-removable media Transport: Serial, SATA 1.0a, SATA II Extensions, SATA Rev ...


1

Apparently everyone saying to use enterprise drives...just because...are mistaken. There are several articles from companies that have actually done this vs just making stuff up. In short: enterprise drive failure rate 4.6%, consumer drive failure rate 4.2%. I really hate it when a well thought-out, passionate argument is destroyed by one tiny ugly ...



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