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9

You need a SAS expander and/or a server with a disk backplane that has an embedded expander... Please see: RAID card w/1x mini-SAS connector : how do I physically connect 16 disks? and How exactly does a SAS SFF-8087 breakout cable work? + RAID/connection questions


8

It's a hard disk with a FC interface. Nope, you probably can't just arbitrarily replace one of them with a disk with a different interface, and different IO characteristics, especially in a storage array. But ask your vendor to be certain, or consult their documentation! And, spend 30 seconds on Google, too.


8

Yes, the extensive command set of the SCSI is a big bonus of using it over SATA. from SAS' Wiki: SATA uses a command set that is based on the parallel ATA command set and then extended beyond that set to include features like native command queuing, hot-plugging, and TRIM. SAS uses the SCSI command set, which includes a wider range of features like error ...


6

You can't use non-HP SSDs in HP ProLiant servers like this. Just because this worked on your G7 server doesn't mean it is okay for your Gen8 ProLiant servers. (basically, why buy enterprise gear, then cripple it with incompatible components?) Please see: 3rd party SSD drives in HP Proliant server - monitoring drive health or Third-party SSD solutions ...


5

For that much storage, you're going to need a storage solution, not a single server. Something like an Isilon installation, or a clustered/scale-out file solution on either Windows or Linux. Given that you're not even sure how to do RAID for this, I'd recommend that you hire a pro, if this storage is going to be used for something professional. It will be ...


4

Whether there's read or write activity, the drives are still online and spinning! Edit: This may just be a function of using the Dynamic Smart Array driver (hpvsa module). HP explains the drive functions here. Please also see HP's video detailing their SmartDrive disk carrier.


3

Intentionally degrading your array because you don't want to take a proper backup is a bad idea. I would never consider this as a valid option. If you don't want to back up to tape (a lot of people don't) then, at least do disk-to-disk backups where the disks are in a separate server. A backup that is stored on the same server being backed up is no backup at ...


3

Consider using a purpose-built internal or external RDX backup drive system for this. RDX consists of ruggedized SATA disks in cartridge form and is intended specifically for hot-swap and backup purposes. The drive is inexpensive and you can purchase "cartridges" or disks separately, as you need them. If not, an external USB3 disk and backup software go ...


3

You need to first initiate devfsadm cleanup subroutines. # devfsadm -C -c disk -v Then, configure and create device path # devfsadm -c disk -v If that is unsuccessful, then... Remove the disk. # cfgadm -c unconfigure sata0/5::dsk/c2t5d0 Initiate devfsadm cleanup subroutines. # devfsadm -C -c disk -v Verify the disk has been removed. # cfgadm ...


3

Yes, it's called a SAS-based disk controller :) There's nothing else to be done I'm afraid, SAS disks are generally SATA-capable but not the other way around sorry.


2

You should use RAID-1 for your setup. Even if you don't noticed improvements for writes, you still get faster reads, as stripes can be read from both disks and you if one of your disks fail, you can just ask the provider to replace the broken disk and sync them. Just because you haven't had a hard disk fail with a provider, doesn't mean you are safe. You ...


2

From the HP site:Storage Controllers: Integrated IntelĀ® 82801IR Serial ATA Host Controller with RAID 0/1 support. (Better known as ICH9R). This one seems to use IntelĀ® Matrix RAID which is Fake RAID. In other words, you need to configure the RAID in the BIOS, but the actual implementation is done by drivers rather than via hardware. This means that you will ...


2

My recommendations vary a bit based on the distribution and approach to ZFS... SSD-only pools work well - However, you need to think very carefully about the controller, backplane and drive layout. Main considerations are: no expanders, use pure SAS HBAs, ZFS mirrors are king. 15k SAS disks in 2014 are Meh - If you need the random I/O performance of SSDs. ...


2

Sure, this is an easy process... Once the rebuild is done, you can either use the "Unused Space" to create another Logical Drive (e.g. Logical Drive 3), or you can Extend Logical Drive 2 to utilize the extra space. Once this is done, you'll see a larger block device available to your operating system. If this is Windows, the free space will be ...


2

Wow, 3 days of pulling my hair out... I don't know if it is because my motherboard chipset doesn't support VT-d (only VT-x), but in the DomU I have to add a simple iommu=soft to the kernel boot parameters in /boot/grub/menu.lst and it solved everything!! It's always the simple things in the end.


2

We tried lots of different things, from reseating all the HD, to making sure all connections were solid on the board, to power cycling, to configuration changes, etc.... As the last option, we pulled the two data drives and booted just with the OS drive. I allowed the RAID controller to think the two data drives had failed. The server booted up and applied ...


2

You can use SATA drives with these servers. The SAS interface is also SATA compatible. However, the reverse is not true. The biggest concern with using SATA disks in such an old server/controller is that the SATA link speed will likely be 1.5Gbps instead of 3.0Gbps or 6.0Gbps. Used SAS disks aren't expensive. I'd really recommend considering those ...


2

There's nothing on the market that will make it cost-effective or worth using those particular drives. I do own a SansDigital Mobilstor 8-bay SAS enclosure. It's 8 pounds and measures 7.0x10.5x5.5 inches. It only has SAS output, but can be coupled with a Magma or OWC Helios Thunderbolt expansion enclosure outfitted a Mac-supported SAS card (ATTO, LSI, ...


2

I'm assuming your server is either an HP ProLiant DL380 G5 system (2U rackmount) or a ML350 G5 server (5U rackmount or tower). The DL350 G5 does not exist. I'm also assuming 72GB SAS disks are in use. Either way, that server is old. It was available on the market from 2006 until 2009. Your BIOS and RAID controller firmware are likely out-of-date, given the ...


1

The drive will need to be offline on the host to mount it as a pass-through. So, if it is mounted as a SCSI device on the VM, you should be able to remove it from the VM, it should disappear from the VM You'd need to make sure it removes the disk gracefully though. Do your swap and then replace the disk and reverse. Sounds good in theory, but on the VM, ...


1

As long as the drive isn't part of an active RAID array, not in RAID 0, and not being accessed at the time, you should be able to replace failed drives no problem. SATA is hot-pluggable and hot-swappable. Are you using a hardware RAID controller, or the fake RAID built-in to some motherboards?


1

You should probably have a look at the SBSbackup HCL (apparently compiled by some forum enthusiasts, not MSFT) if you're going to depend on something like this: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/1780.windows-small-business-server-external-backup-drives-compatibility-list.aspx WRT to the "x-dock" in your coolermaster, it's easy to ...


1

The Fusion-MPT SAS controller you have is a low end RAID controller. If you're not using it for RAID, it may still be providing an unhelpful layer of obstruction/abstraction. You may need to poke at the RAID controller with mpt-status or lsiutil to get it to actually scan the bus. http://hwraid.le-vert.net/wiki/LSIFusionMPT has a nice amount of ...


1

With regard to non-HP SSDs in ProLiant servers, nope... nope... nope... nope... Anyway, this is an HP ProLiant server, so it has an onboard Smart Array RAID controller. In order to use the disks connected to that controller, you have to create a "logical drive". (here's a guide) Please tap F8 to enter the HP Smart Array BIOS utility when prompted or use ...


1

If you have physical access (to add disks) but it's headless, do one of two things (depending on physical constraints): Attach a KVM Use a crash cart If you are only swapping disks the boot order should not change unless there is a BIOS bug; in which case, try updating or reflashing it.


1

I see the same type of problem with my SuperMicro X7DCA-L with the latest BIOS (R1.2a), though I don't even have to change anything for it to happen. The machine just randomly decides to move things out of the excluded list and/or change the boot order. Sometimes I can reboot several times in a row before it happens, but it happens regularly. I'm assuming ...


1

Nope, not that I know of. This is SOOOO fringe that noone makes something like that. External SAS enclosures with thunderbolt do exist, and they ARE portable, I am just sure they are not your definition of portable ;) It is also off topic here as we do not look kindly on people asking for product recommendations. A good site to ask is this thing called ...


1

I would consider purchasing a NAS device with its own RAID array to do your backups. We (the company I work for) has a NAS that all our backup jobs dump their data to on a daily basis allowing us to leverage incremental backups. The NAS is in turn backed up via USB3 to an external disk which is taken off-site nightly (we use two disks so one is always ...


1

The major vendors are becoming more protective and restrictive in their "acceptable" drive configurations. However, the firmware on the disks is also a way to ensure compatibility and a consistent process for maintenance and monitoring. That said, you can usually use generic disks in branded servers... For instance, an HP may complain, but basic ...


1

The first thing that should be noted is that for most practical workloads of a single mechanical disk, even SATA1 which offers a transfer rate of 150 MB/s would not present a bottleneck. The higher transfer rates are mainly relevant for either cached I/O or high-performance SSDs. The first case is rare enough not to make a significant difference in overall ...



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