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1

Yes they're allowed and supported (but not your last 2 examples, can't use it for a drive letter, see link updated in 2014: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2962341


3

There is a known problem with powershell exit codes (see the end of this answer) that can manifest when using powershell installation scripts with SCCM. To workaround the problem, I take two measures: I always have SCCM invoke a batch file which runs the powershell script by invoking powershell.exe explicitly. I ensure that every code path in the ...


1

This is by design, only users logged into the computer can install apps via the app catalog. Trying to "fake out" the app catalog by logging into it with a different Id won't work. The proper way to go about this is to either advertise the programs to all users, or, since that could get messy, have your Rockstar techs log into the computer with their admin ...


1

Since there is a technician involved anyway why don't you just have the technician deploy the desired application to that user from the SCCM console? If you wanted to make it more interactive for the end-user the technician could temporarily add the end-user to an "all applications available" user collection while they access the catalog and figure out ...


2

If your goal is to build a Collection based on specific usernames, I think the easiest and maintainable way to do this is add those users to a security group and create a User Collection. For Example: We have a User Collection for a specific group of contractors. select ...


3

Does user need to be logged in to the target laptop, or is it sufficient that it is on the corporate network? In general, the answer is no the user does not need to be logged in, the only exception being that if in the Application-Program model the Deployment Type you are using in this instance requires a user presence (Deployment Type - User ...



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