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7

This functionality is provided by rpm, not yum: rpm -ql [packagename] From the documentation: The general form of an rpm query command is rpm {-q | --query} [PACKAGE_NAME] [query-options] Information selection options: -l, --list List files in package.


7

Most modern servers come with an out-of-band management option, eg HP's ILO, Dells DRAC, IBM's RSA, so you don't actually need to go to the rack anymore to manage them. Simply use the correct form of KVM over IP to take over the console from the comfort of your desk! They come with virtual media which uses an ISO image on your desktop to emulate an CD/DVD ...


7

I also love eject! anyway, you need to check support package from your server vendor. for example, HP provides a command line utility to check/set/unset UID LED for their proliant servers. and iLO, HP's remote management tool, provide same function.


7

If your out-of-band management does not allow you to flash the indicator, you could try ethtool if you have a spare/empty network interface ethtool -p eth2 Should flash the LED for eth2: -p --identify Initiates adapter-specific action intended to enable an operator to easily identify the adapter by sight. Typically this involves blinking ...


6

If they've still got internal speakers, I used to get mileage out of doing cat /kernel/unix > /dev/audio, and then running around a dark and empty trading floor homing in on the shrieking machine.


6

rpm -ql packagename is roughly equivalent. You should think of yum as similar to apt-get and rpm as roughly equivalent to dpkg. yum deals with packages in terms of repositories, and rpm deals with individual packages. Ubuntu actually provides a cheat sheet on similar actions: Switching between RedHat and Ubuntu


6

If you absolutely want to use yum security plugin, there is a way to do this, although a little elaborate. But once you have it setup, it's all automated. The only requirement is that you will need to have at-least one subscription to RHN. Which is a good investment IMO, but lets stick to the point. Once you have the subscription, you can use mrepo, or ...


5

It could be an SELinux issue. Check /var/log/audit/audit.log for any related messages. See this informative post for more information, including a possible fix: # chcon -t home_root_t /homedir/stefanl


4

I have just tested an automated kickstart install (driven by cobbler) and it works fine for me. All I had to do is press Ctrl+Alt+F2 (virt-manager has a menu for this). The only problem is that the shell is not avaialble right away, you have to wait for the installer to reach a certain stage. Regarding debugging, you might find the Anaconda logging page ...


4

I use CentOS, but the easiest way I've found to configure a system via kickstart is to install and configure a system the way I want it to be, then look at /root/anaconda-ks.cfg. That file is a kickstart the install you just did. I assume that Scientific has this file as well. Once you have that file, I've found it much easier to modify (add/remove) what I ...


4

While you can check some things, during shutdown, you cannot run fsck effectively for your root filesystem. fsck requires that the filesystem is not mounted before it can attempt repair. This is only possible during boot, while still running from initramfs.


4

Well, get creative - there's USB controlled LED device like the blink(1) or the blink stick that may work, though the blink(1) seems out of stock everywhere. For a more ghetto solution, get a bunch of the cheapest USB keys you can, stick them on a USB port, and when you need to identify a system, create and delete a small file (or just keep writing to it) ...


4

Make sure you have shadow and passalgo=sha512 on a machine, set the root pass to whatever password you want on that machine and take it from /etc/shadow and put it in the kickstart. This is not advisable for production use. To do it programmatic, use the crypt library of your chosen language that generates the kickstart file: RUBY: 'password'.crypt('$6$' ...


3

The way a hashed password is generated is documented here. $ python -c 'import crypt; print(crypt.crypt("My Password", "$6$My salt"))' The reason why it is not working for you is because you are using a Mac to generate the hash. The crypt implementation differs from the GNU/Linux one. From the crypt(3) manpage: Glibc notes The glibc2 version of ...


3

when I tried to install I had the same problem. using the procedure in xenserver (cli) xe vm-list get uuid of your vm xe vm-param-set uuid=uuid_of_your_virtual_machine platform:viridian=false I could continue the installation.


3

Never, ever edit any system files by hand unless you have a good clue about what they do and their correct format. By editing any copying those files by hand, you have corrupted their contents, and reset the permissions of the original ones (Thanks god you did a backup). I do not know about the stock configuration of CentOS, but this might or might not ...


3

Scientific Linux can now list security updates from the commandline. Furthermore I can update a system to only apply security updates, which is better then the default ("Just update everything! Including bugfixes which you don't care about and which introduce regressions." I have tested this on both Scientific Linux 6.1 and a 6.4. I'm not sure when this was ...


3

Download the package(s) and type rpm -Uvh <packagenames> as root or sudo rpm -Uvh <packagenames> as normal user I used rpm -qpR yum-3.2.27-14.el6.noarch.rpm to get a list of dependencies for yum, hope that gets all off them in one go: Download all the packages with the following code block: wget ...


2

Since you have CFEngine, you could apply changes to groups of systems at time based on the security updates posted at: http://twitter.com/#!/CentOS_Announce I'm not the biggest server security engineer out there... but I tend to find that I only care about a few packages when it comes to security. Anything that's public-facing (ssl, ssh, apache) or has a ...


2

Scientific Linux (at least 6.2 and 6.3; I don't have any 6.1 systems left) not only supports yum-plugin-security but the configuration file for for yum-autoupdate, /etc/sysconfig/yum-autoupdate, allows you enable only the installation of security updates. # USE_YUMSEC # This switches from using yum update to using yum-plugin-security # true - run ...


2

On CentOS you can use yum list updates instead of yum-plugin-security, or maybe you want to try this script scanning based on CentOS security news feeds: LVPS.


2

The correct command without setting SELinux to permissive is: #chcon -t home_root_t /homedir (note the missing stefanl directory)


2

Another option is to install the openjdk available via the distribution. yum install java-1.7.0-openjdk java-1.7.0-openjdk-devel


2

A little late to the game but if you need to configure kdump for the future: I think the path directive designates a path from the partition or file system designated. By default this is the root fs. If you have a separate partition in fstab for /var it will obfuscate the crash directory when your system is booted normally. ie if you were to boot normally ...


2

AFAIK all of the modern servers come with the BMC [Baseboard management card] and provide an IPMI compliant interface both accessible from the OS and network, Other vendors should provide something similar, in case of Dell servers this is the generic IPMI command which starts flashing the chassis LED: ipmitool chassis identify 1 and ipmitool chassis ...


1

I was just going to advise the OSP option, but the real fix is probably upgrading your ESXi host to the current revision/patch level. As of this writing, your build number is 1065491, and the current is 1483097. VMware Tools often get incremented in the ESXi patch releases. It makes sense to keep your hosts up to date.


1

I'm guessing the machine you're using also has the puppetlabs repo installed in /etc/yum.repos.d/? If you remove it from there (and flush the yum cache), do you still see this issue? I would suspect you're going to want to give reposync an entirely new yum.conf (via --config), specifying a different cache directory then the normal system one.


1

Create a node(server) group and add any server to it that you deem necessary. In the Spacewalk WebUI go to Systems, then click into your group, then click the button at top right that says "work with group" Select the package tab and choose either some or all of the package's that apply and then click apply package.


1

The functionality is called "system set manager" for dynamic groups and "system groups" for pre-defined groupings. See this screenshot and the getting started guide from the Red Hat Satellite manuals – HBruijn 3 hours ago As requested copied as an answer, but a two line comment with two links does not make a good one :( Especially since your question is ...


1

Pull apart your kdump initrd in /boot/ check to to see the final path that its trying to dump to. I think the "path" option is a little weird, I'd probably leave it to the default or set it explicitly to /var/crash Do you have some kind of watchdog rebooting the machine ? this may also prevent the core being created by rebooting the machine before the is ...



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