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First, let's sort out some factoids that are easy to confuse: SSH (and hence scp) supports various methods of authentication. The two most popular by far are "password" and "publickey" If one uses "publickey", then the client side has to have a private and a public key file [1] The private key file may or may not be encrypted with a passphrase When the ...


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You should read this post: 3 Steps to Perform SSH Login Without Password Using ssh-keygen and you can change your script to this: rsync --rsh='ssh -p(Type your SSH port)' -av /yourBackupDir backupUser@backupserver.example.com:/backup | mail -s "backup on `hostname`" your@email.account


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You can't provide passphrase to scp with argument. However you can use authentication by key: ssh-keygen will generate rsa keys pair for authentication ssh-copy-id will copy your public key to another host. if you can't or don't want to use authentication by keys then you can write expect script and provide passphrase from this script. It's not most secure ...


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Well -r is the recursive flag and -R is an invalid flag. Use man pages for these kinds of questions, man scp


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Why you can't use public key authentication, ForwardAgent yes in .ssh/config and just scp user@server1:path user@server2:path ? I've try and it works for me.


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The closest suggestion I can come up with is using ssh-agent Start an agent, if you don't already have one: ssh-agent bash Load a key: ssh-add ssh to one host and have it initiate a copy to/from the other: scp user@server1:path user@server2:path Instead of using scp without the -3 flag, you can explicitly ssh to one host and start scp, then you get to ...


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Actually scp transfers files over SSH protocol, so you need SSH access to the machine to be able to use scp. If you are concerned about security a firewall is what you need - blocking access from unwanted visitors on the public interface. Alternatively you can configure sshd to listen on the private IP only and setup an OpenVPN server to gain access to ...


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SCP is ssh. There is no "server" as in ftp, that listens, aside from the sshd daemon. If you enable ssh connection, you also enable scp (which is not a distinct protocl) and vice versa..


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If scp is not possible and the transfer should be between 2 *nix hosts, you can always cat the file over ssh. serverA: local machine serverB: remote machine on serverA you do: ssh serverB "cat /path/to/remote/file" > /path/to/local/file this way you order serverB to cat the remote file while grabbing the output of this and putting it in the local file.



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