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17

What I did to disable local delivery. I'll be using the example.com domain. Requirements: example.com A entry pointing to IP address assigned to one of the eth interfaces. /etc/hosts defining example.com assigned to the very same IP address as above example.com MX records pointing to Google servers (ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM, etc) default sendmail installation ...


14

check /var/log/maillog or /var/log/messages if you're on *nix Also, if nothing is going out you may want to check your firewall as follows (be sure to do this as root): [root@web01 ~]# iptables -L Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT) target prot opt source destination ACCEPT tcp -- anywhere anywhere tcp ...


14

Perhaps you've installed sendmail by using the sendmail-bin individual package instead of installing the sendmail wrapper package. Anyway, if you install sensible-mda (or the sendmail wrapper package), the problem you're seeing should disappear.


14

One consequence of removing the MTA is that mail generated by the system itself (usually sent to root), for example by Cron, Logwatch, rkhunter and others cannot be be delivered. So yes, an MTA is an integral part of any Unix-like system and I doubt Debian will let you uninstall the MTA without complaining and suggesting an alternative. But it's not a big ...


13

Instead of using /root/.forward, have you tried putting root: me@batcavern.com into /etc/aliases? (Note that you need to run newaliases after updating the aliases file.)


11

Queued messages are stored in /var/spool/mqueue. So try this (I assume you want to get rid of all messages in the queue): Stop sendmail rm -rf /var/spool/mqueue/* (might be called mqueue-client on Ubuntu) Start sendmail


11

Sendmail is a different (and much older) program from Postfix. However for every mail server to succeed in the Unix environment, a sendmail binary (with some of the expected command line options) must be provided. EDIT: See for example the manual page for the sendmail program provided by Postfix


11

Well, if I understand RFC 822, they are legal in certain cases, I think it's an artifact from the days of small screens with 24x80 resolutions.. These sections seem to be fairly clear Subjects can be folded, and folding is a CRLF plus LWSP(linear white space) character.. it's possible they've been supeseded, Wietse (on the postfix lists) knows his RFCs ...


10

Sendmail: short host name to FQDN via /etc/hosts entry Reorder your /etc/hosts file entries: 127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain 127.0.1.1 myhost.mydomain.eu myhost.domain2.eu myhost It should qualify myhost to myhost.mydomain.eu (the leftmost name in /etc/hosts line with myhost)


10

Simply changed: 127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain 127.0.0.1 foo.bar To this 127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain foo.bar Sendmail looks for a fully qualified domain (FQDN) name and will use the localhost.localdomain in the single line version.


9

formail, part of procmail (and probably already available on your system) can take a mailbox, split it up into messages, and then run a command on each one. From the man page: -s The input will be split up into separate mail messages, and piped into a program one by one (a new program is started for every part). -s has to be the ...


9

/bin/mail -s "Enter Subject Line here" -a /home/.../whateverFileYouWantAttached "you@YourEmailAddress" < /home/me/textBody.letter try above command :)


9

You're not actually receiving traffic on port 25, but on port 80, via your web server. This traffic is attempting to use your server as a proxy to disguise the origin of the traffic. We generally call such servers open proxies, and they're quite useful for delivering spam and conducting attacks on other sites. For some reason, some people seem to think ...


8

TL;DR: Your webmail program is badly written and thinks that the response code 354 is an error, even though it isn't. Long answer: This is what the SMTP conversation looks like (S = server, C = client) S: 220 foo.com Simple Mail Transfer Service Ready C: EHLO bar.com S: 250-foo.com greets bar.com S: 250-8BITMIME S: 250-SIZE S: 250-DSN S: ...


8

The short answer is "you can't". The longer answer, from the sendmail FAQ, is How can I automatically copy messages based on sender or recipient addresses? It would require custom programming [...] Note that no such feature has been added to sendmail. When asked about this one of the sendmail developers said it was "because we still believe a ...


8

I added the following in sendmail.mc: define(`confDOMAIN_NAME', `mail.foo.com')dnl and then: m4 sendmail.mc > sendmail.cf service sendmail restart I also verified that this worked with the email verifier service at http://www.port25.com/domainkeys/ (auth-results@verifier.port25.com). Neat service, you send it an email and it replies to the from ...


8

MTA - Mail Transfer Agent - sends and receives email between MTAs and among other elements of an email system Postfix Sendmail Exim MDA - Mail Delivery Agent - receives email from an MTA for delivery to a mailbox procmail dovecot Courier MUA - Mail User Agent - email client Thunderbird elm Exchange Here is an overview of how the elements ...


8

I did this on my development box by disabling sendmail completely and then having a simple perl script listen on the SMTP port and dump the emails into a directory. I'm sure it's possible to do with the sendmail configuration, but the perl script was much easier. Here's it stripped down to the essentials: #!/usr/bin/perl -w use Net::SMTP::Server; use ...


8

Make sure that mail server MX record is referring has A record, CNAME is not enough. This is important but I do no remember why. Here is an example: $ORIGIN example.com. @ IN SOA dns0.yourisp.com. zone.yourisp.com. 1308717736 21600 7200 1209600 10800 @ IN NS dns1.yourisp.com. @ IN NS dns2.yourisp.com. @ IN MX 10 ...


8

Currently you have: iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 25 -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp --sport 25 -m state --state ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT Which allows: packets to your sendmail in, packets from your port 25 out, but only for already established connections (so only connections from the outside). For outgoing ...


7

The postfix documentation tells you exactly what you need to do.


7

On Debian-based systems exim logs data in /var/log/exim4/mainlog. You might find the eximstats tool useful for parsing and culling useful information out of that log file.


7

My choice is setup a postfix server in the same web server that sent mail only for localhost and with this setting in main.cf to use a remote SMTP server: relayhost = [a.b.c.d] It works for me.


7

Where are the logs? The default location depends on your linux/unix system, but the most common places are /var/log/maillog /var/log/mail.log /var/adm/maillog /var/adm/syslog/mail.log If it's not there, look up /etc/syslog.conf. You should see something like this mail.* -/var/log/maillog sendmail writes logs to the mail facility of syslog. ...


7

The sendmail package. No problems with it really, might even be installed by default. # echo "test" | mail -s "test" your@email.com None other then that. Check out the reference page.


7

The following line in your m4 config generation file will cause sendmail to listen to port 25 only on 127.0.0.1: DAEMON_OPTIONS(`Port=smtp,Addr=127.0.0.1, Name=MTA')dnl


7

The MTA is used to handle all kinds of messaging, not just email to user mailboxes. On my CentOS system, it is using a whopping 4 MB of RAM. That's less than one PHP thread. Don't jeopardize the stability and operation of your server for a pittance of extra capacity. Buy more capacity instead.


6

according to the man page can disable cron mail by adding -m off to the daemon args -m This option allows you to specify a shell command to use for sending Cron mail output instead of using sendmail(8) This command must accept a fully formatted mail message (with headers) on stan‐ dard input and send it as a mail message to ...


6

The service --status-all command tries to figure out for every init script in /etc/init.d if it supports a status command (by grepping the script for status). If it doesn't find that string it will print [ ? ] for that service. Otherwise it will run /etc/init.d/$application status. If the return code is 0 it prints [ + ]. If it's not 0 it prints [ - ]. ...


6

You have specified answer in the question itself. You can do that using define(`SMART_HOST', `smtp.your.provider')dnl Are you facing any problem using this. After editing /etc/mail/sendmail.mc you should go to directory /etc/mail. Type make and then restart sendmail service for changes to take effect. Then send a test mail and see message headers ...



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