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Yes, there are two solutions: Use SSLv3 compile without /* #define TLSEXT_TYPE_padding 21 */ Reference here.


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Circumstances forced me to compile openssl 1.0.1g from sources and I encountered behavior identical to that reported above. This is under Fedora 18 on a 64-bit Intel. Like the original poster reports, most mail went out OK but one mail destination suffered the same TLS handshake failures. The openssl change log showed only three changes from 1.0.1f to ...


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OK IPTABLES was to blame. I flushed my rules, restarted sendmail and got a backlog of emails arriving in my inbox. Now I'll restore my IPTABLES rules and figure out which rule was blocking DNS.


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The easy fix is to rename the host to a name that actually does exist in the DNS.


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AFAIK there is no such sendmail's command line option. You may use sendmail wrapper script/program to fix your problem. Does your code accepts custom sendmail's path? You may use FEATURE(use_ct_file) in submit.mc to stop sendmail from generating X-Authentication-Warning: for users listed in /etc/mail/trusted-users file.


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The fact that you're seeing delay between "MAIL FROM" and next command implies that sendmail is validating the sender address. This does strongly suggest a DNS/networking issue but you say that DNS lookups by hand are OK. If this mail server is using a DNS server under your control, could you try turning on query logging to see what questions are being asked ...


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Try sendmail -bv root. It should show how where sendmail is going to deliver messages for given recipient. man sendmail : -bv Verify names only - do not try to collect or deliver a message. Verify mode is normally used for validating users or mailing lists. If you want to see also processing by internal rulesets then ...


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Honestly, the right thing to do is to pick the ISP where you put your main mail server a little more carefully. But assuming that's out of the question, I wouldn't do this at layer 3 (iptables), I'd do it at layer 4 (application, being SMTP), taking advantage of SMTP's inherent store-and-forward nature. The procedure looks somewhat like this: Set up a ...


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Try attaching strace to your sendmail process and see what it gives you acter the you manually type the mail from command (of course you should make sure nobody else is using the SMTP service by that time. This should give you a better idea of which sender check is slow. If unsure how to use Steve this simple blog post may be of some help (especially ...


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A mail server can perform a lot of validations of the sender address. Most of these validations involve DNS lookups. If DNS is misconfigured on the server or if the sender domain is misconfigured some of these DNS lookups can time out. Reverse DNS on the client IP could also have been misconfigured such that lookups time out. Two checks that are sometimes ...


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dsn=5.0.0, stat=Service unavailable This is generic error. It also indicates in the log that your message is relayed to root@localhost, so check it's mailbox for more information. I think your problem is that you have localhost set as your hostname. Set it to normal: Change your server's hostname from localhost to FQDN hostname; Update /etc/hosts and ...



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