Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

121

If I were you, I'd call the company's insurance company, and have them place out an accelerometer. This way - the insurance company will know that you're not the one shaking the disks, and the insurance company will know for sure when every blast has gone off, in case your SAN dies at the exact same moment. (We did this.)


112

In no particular order here are some suggestions that have been helpful to me over the years- Can any of the equipment in those racks be eliminated, upgraded or consolidated? It's hard to tell what's there, but in my experience these kinds of messes tend to be aggravated by gear that should have been pulled out years ago. Once you've got some idea of the ...


111

Please call a cabling contractor in to spend a day or two onsite to "dress" your cables. I used to spend time dealing with this type of work on my own, but realize that cabling contractors are faster and more organized. A good cabling contractor is better at this than you are! They will have the right resources to tag, test, get custom lengths, dress ...


88

Now would be the time to make sure you've verified your backup solution. All the replacement hardware in the world won't save you if your backups are corrupt or have otherwise been rendered useless.


72

This is a strange question, but I'm gonna attempt to answer it anyway. All electrical fires must be extinguished carefully. Especially if they're still live. Fire departments will all recommend the use of a CO2 extinguisher. In a datacentre environment, however, I'd (But I don't recommend you) do one of two things. Hit the EPO (Emergency Power Off) ...


71

Carpet is a big 'NO! NO!!' for a room hosting equipments that are of high value, because of the fire risk. Water is too, for obvious reasons. You should straight call maintenance immediately and have them repair the drainage system. The water could really cause problems, inform your superiors right away and draw their attention on the matter.


69

Check local fire-codes. Really. In 2003 I was involved in setting up a new datacenter for work. My job was more moving the gear, not wrangling with the architects and contractors who were building it. Imagine my surprise when I found sprinkler heads in the datacenter during my first walk through. I got about a quarter of the way to indignant outrage before ...


57

Enough space for expansion Plenty of network ports Sufficient network bandwidth Plenty of dedicated power sockets Should not be on the ground floor (risk of flooding + less secure) Fire suppression facilities + smoke alarms IP KVM for remote access Telephone (so the operator can call a support line while looking at the hardware) Pens + paper A label printer ...


55

Nobody has mentioned "why" water in a server room is dangerous. It might be obvious, but just to put it out there... Server rooms have a good deal of electrical equipment running on AC and DC current. Usually they are well grounded, but sometimes insulation breaks down, or a wire gets pinched. A person touching an electrical potential is protected by ...


50

A co-worker and I recently cleaned up a mess that was pretty bad (I might post pictures later if I get some time) and I wholeheartedly disagree with the contractor approach. You will learn significantly more about the system itself and what deficiencies it has if you do the work yourself. Also when you make a mistake, as you or any other mortal is likely ...


49

If these machines are directly on the carpet (carpet in a server room ? seriously ?) then you might want to lift them off a few inches. Any non-conductive material will do - wood, stone, plastic, foam, whatever. In a pinch, put some cardboard under them.


47

In addition to all the other excellent suggestions (particularly off-site backups) you should consider dust proofiing your room to the extent practical: Weather stripping around the doors, tape around the windows, etc. If you have external air intakes plan on changing the filters when the blasting is over. All that said, I wouldn't waste time/resources on ...


46

Do you work in your server room? Generally no, although in some companies with only 2-3 servers, yes - my office was the server room. Is this a common practice? For small companies and technology startups, yes - space is an issue. How do you cope? I make a business case against it, security, cost, etc. If that doesn't work, I bring a sound level meter ...


42

My sympathies to you. I was tasked with a similar problem for a number of cabinets, equally as horrendous. The approach I took was as follows: Use a spread sheet to make a list of which port is connected to which port on which piece of equipment (arduous manual process of cable tracking). Try to use a spread sheet cell to represent a port, and order ...


40

Recommendations on server room temperature vary greatly. This guide says that: General recommendations suggest that you should not go below 10°C (50°F) or above 28°C (82°F). Although this seems a wide range these are the extremes and it is far more common to keep the ambient temperature around 20-21°C (68-71°F). For a variety of reasons this can ...


40

It's bringing this thread back from the dead, but I wanted to add my two cents to this question. Novec 1230 from 3M is great stuff also. It's a liquid fire suppressant that's: Non-conductive Evaporates harmlessly (and is broken down by UV light as it evaporates) Doesn't damage paper It truly is amazing stuff. You can drop a textbook in it and it'll be ...


37

Things that I always carry on my person, so would be present: cell phone iPod pen/notepad thumb drive multitool Things that I keep in my laptop bag so I don't have to think about it: "carb bars" (I don't know what these are, but they last forever. My wife made me start carrying them after I had to sleep in a data center during a blizard.) quarters for ...


36

A workspace with enough room to work comfortably on a broken 19" server, with screen, keyboard, mouse. Separate from the racks. An old PC. Optimally with controllers and slots to fit every piece of hardware you may have to analyze. Mine speaks SCSI wide & narrow, IDE, SATA, PCI, USB, Firewire 400. Keep a small stash of old computers, if you can. They ...


36

Here's a bit of information not generally published and at times even denied - the insulation used in most electronic components will burn and burn rather well once a suitable temperature has been reached. This includes the material circuit boards are made of, as well as the lacquer used to coat most components. Some types of insulation, once lit, will add ...


33

HP servers, Supermicro server and surely any non-Dell systems likely don't have an LCD on the front. If I label, the location depends on the server model/type... And this is really a common-sense, do-what-works-for-you question. For instance, on the 1U rack mount systems pictured below, I'd likely add a label on the CD/DVD drive. For the systems here, I ...


30

I seen this a while back and thought it was a good idea. Granted it only works with dell servers. Replacing the dell logo with a bottle cap http://blog.gtuhl.com/2007/05/25/server-naming-conventions/


29

We have a couple of tower servers in a small server room. Put them on a table.


27

First: When the server room becomes a building site, you must remove all the servers, for several reasons. power outages cooling outages access (you dont know who walks past your servers, on what hour) mechanical stress due to building machinery direct damage by workers who go bump residual dust from the building site, especially metalic or mineral dust ...


26

You might want to place a small shelf near the entrance to put a pair of these


25

Mount your server racks on ISO-Base platforms. This will isolate your server rack from the ground shocks and allow your systems to function even in the event of movement. It's not easy, but is effective. Especially in earthquake zones. To see the ISO-Base in action, check out this video showing the effects in a server rack during an earthquake simulation. ...


24

First of all, carpet in server room is also very dangerous when it's dry, because moving around on them generates static electricity that is very unsafe for computers. If you can, remove the carpet and buy some kind of special anti-static lining/mat. If you cannot remove the carpet, then buy some anti-static lining and cover the carpet with it. If you ...


23

Speaking from organizational experience at my last job, a small fire in one rack can turn into a big fire with a whole rack, and very shortly afterwards, the rack next to it as well. Fire spreads fast. Once the insulation jackets of all of those power and Ethernet cables gets involved it travels. It travels really fast. Then the flames start tickling the ...


23

says it all, really :)


23

Water + Electricity = Disaster Water cooling allows for greater power density than air cooling; so figure out the cost savings of the extra density (likely none unless you're very space constrained). Then calculate the cost of the risk of a water disaster (say 1% * the cost of your facility). Then do a simple risk-reward comparison and see if it makes sense ...


22

It's really difficult to buy an unsuitable rack today if you're purchasing new. I usually encounter generic, custom or unbranded racks, APC Netshelter, Dell and HP (10642 G1 and G2 models) in the field. They've all been solid and have handled the systems and equipment I've needed to mount within them. The basics: Begin with your servers. Why not match ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible