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6

There are errors on your disk. S.M.A.R.T. stands for Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology The specific errors you mention correlate to mechanical degradation of the drive. You can possibly use this report to obtain a warranty replacement fomr IBM. The drive WILL eventually fail.


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The drive is physically failing at this point. The most important thing to worry about right now is having a good backup of your data, and a plan to get that drive replaced ASAP.


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Google is your friend. This is a list of all error codes and what action you should take to resolve the issues. For all 2xxx codes, it says to flash the latest BIOS and firmware onto the card. If that doesn't work, replace the card.


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There are three "vendor" methods to get alerts from the hardware: Configure the IMM to send alerts/SNMP traps on events (noweight option) Use ServeRAID manager to configure alerts (lightweight option) Setup Director and configure alerts in Director (very heavyweight option) As mfinni said, if you have a large IBM environment you'll benefit the most from ...


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Install the IBM ServeRAID software; pretty certain there should be an option for email alerts in there. A step better is to do that, and also set up an IBM Director server for your environment, if you've got more than a handful of servers.


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When the "Quick Init" option is used to create an array, the "Build" process is bypassed. While this is the fastest method for creating a RAID array, it is only recommended for use with new drives. Data can be written to the drive, but performance will be impacted while the array is in Quick Init mode. In order to get the array into an Optimal state, a ...


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If you want to know about specific option/server compatibility, you need to check ServerProven. (It may work even if it's not on the list). Since the EXP300 talks SCSI and the RAID controller talks SCSI, yes that's just fine. It's not functionally different between having a computer capable of using both IDE and SATA drives.


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The problem here is the write back feature of LSI controller, which only make sense for HDD´s. For SSD´s always use write through and no read ahead and DirectIO (even with RAID5). Then you see the expected performance with more SSD´s...


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Using the boot CD seems to be the only possibility. Download the IBM ServeRaid Support CD form here. Boot from the CD and hit ctrl + m. Raid migration eg. from Raid 1 to 5 is possible. The raid configuration was 3x Raid 1 with one degraded array.


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From a Seagate doc: Predictive failures S.M.A.R.T. signals predictive failures when the drive is performing unacceptably for a period of time. The firmware keeps a running count of the number of times the error rate for each attribute is unacceptable. To accomplish this, a counter is incremented each time the error rate is unacceptable and ...


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Does the controller leave some kind of metadata on the disks that forces my md raid-array to always be run off this particular controller, or will it be a completely generic array that I could plug into "raw" SATA-ports and run just as well? If you mean will you be able to take the disks and plug them into any other controller then probably not no ...


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Both controllers are based on LSI 1030 chipset and there will be 100% HW compatibility. Metadata is stored across the members of the array. You will need to activate RAID volumes from controller BIOS during bootup. Controller won't erase anything unless you want to do that or you set it up so, but anyway, there is no 100% guarantee for data loss prevention. ...


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If the controller supports it, you can use the -d option on smartctl to get access to the underlying devices: smartctl -a -d megaraid,0 /dev/sda Increment the 0 to access each drive in the array.


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there is no official documentation from IBM about this feature but our local dealer referred to the documentation directly from Seagate: http://www.seagate.com/files/staticfiles/docs/pdf/whitepaper/tp621-safeguarding-data-from-corruption-us.pdf EDIT (To avoid link rot): It states that the feature relies on the T10 Protection Information (T10-PI) standard ...


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try turn off raid bios in ur main BIOS.


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I finally solved the puzzle, the problem was because a power surge that fried the Mainboard... i didn't give any attention first, but on closer inspection the condensers on the motherboard where all leaking and some of them exploded.. i'm surprised this thing even booted. any way, thanks every one for the help.


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Check the syslog in the linux distro else If you tested your ram you tested the card in another server your CPU still works without errors (syslog in linux) You might want to conclude you could have a problem on your motherboard.


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If the card is plugged into one of the two slots on the PCI extender, consider moving it to the slots on the main board. It may not be getting enough power early enough in the boot cycle to perform its POST. Changing the slot it is in could help. If the system is lightly loaded with cards, try and have the slot next to it unused, as well.


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The boot off the SAS controller could come under "external device" or similar heading in the BIOS. You can also call IBM support, they should be able to tell you, how to set this up. The checklist to run: Is the controller supported by your server? Check e.g. here: http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/tips0740.html Is the controller supported by your ...


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I'm trying to do the same thing, but my Googling led me to believe that I had to configure the controller before installing the operating system using this bootable CD. Unfortunately, the CD did not detect my ServeRAID 8I controller on my MXE 460, but it might work for you. It turns out I didn't have a card in my server in the first place. DERP. This ...


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You need to load the RAID driver when booting from the OS installation CD.


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Your thought on building a new RAID 1 and cloning your existing install is correct, there really is no better way to do it. You will either need to load the drivers for the new controller into the existing OS, or use an imaging product that supports alternate hardware restores. EDIT: I mention the alternate hardware restore because I don't know what ...


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The quick initialization process initializes the first 1024 sectors of the logical drive. After initializing the array should go to the status Optimal. There is no need to synchronize after you create the array.


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DISCLAIMER: I can't say the following is 100 % true in your case since different controllers and algorithms are just too different. Probably this status is similar to what you get as result of using "assume-clean" option when creating RAID with Linux Soft RAID's mdadm. When you make a write to RAID, data gets written to both of the disks for sure. But ...


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Are you sure the new hard disk isn't "DOA"?


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CRC checks in disk I/O revolve around generating a unique checkword during a write operation to disk, and reading that checkword correctly back during the read operation. A sector is a subdivision of a track on a magnetic disk. Sectors are where we store information. Newer hard drives use 4096 byte sector size. Write operation. Imagine a 4096 byte buffer ...


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CRC is a basic integrity checking, it's a non-secure version of hashes like MD5 and SHA1. Computing CRC probably causes enough of a slowdown that either the controller or disks want to work in 1.5gbit mode No idea. Probably only slightly more of a risk then with it turned off.


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The orange led doesn't mean that the drive is broken: it means that it's marked as failed. Recently I had the same issue on a ServeRaid 6i: two drives disappeared. The raid was level 5. I put one of the two online and I rebuilt the second. At the end of the process I got my array rebuild. Of course it was not a broken disk but a weird bug into the ...


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Yes, it will work. I've got an old IBM Ultra 160 controller in a whitebox, and I have a HP controller in a Dell. Actually I just looked at it, and it's an IBM 4mx!



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