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When not using chroot or internal-sftp, the OpenSSH package uses a program named sftp-server to handle incoming SFTP sessions. The documentation for sftp-server lists a command-line option for the starting directory: -d start_directory specifies an alternate starting directory for users. The pathname may contain the following tokens that are expanded ...


0

Turns out that neither restart or even stop+start was sufficient as it wouldn't kill the running daemon of sshd. I had to grab a physical access to the server, stop, then kill <sshd PID> (so that the server wouldn't accept any new incoming connection), and then start again the daemon.


2

The OpenSSH sshd_config documentation is pretty clear about the requirements for the chroot directory. The restriction applies any time the ChrootDirectory directive is used: ChrootDirectory Specifies the pathname of a directory to chroot(2) to after authentication. All components of the pathname must be root- owned directories that are not ...


0

internal-SFTP provide an easy way to chrooted SFTP, with some limitations indeed. If you want to avoid limitations like root-owned parent dir, you have to use sftp-server, but you have to create some minimal chrooted environment for user, with bash, cd, ls and so forth. Chrooted environment should be created as described here: ...


-2

WinSCP itself (unless they fixed in the lasts version?) is dreadfully slow compared to others, I'd recommend Filezilla over WinSCP, MUCH faster for ssh file transfers compared to winscp.


5

WinSCP uses PuTTY code internally. So there should not be any difference in an encryption algorithm selected. Though WinSCP employs some optimizations on top of the PuTTY code, particularly larger internal and network buffers. That helps in certain cases to achieve a better throughput. Some references: http://winscp.net/tracker/show_bug.cgi?id=615 ...


-1

Pscp has no -c switch to select a cipher like scp on *nix. To get around this you can save your destination host as a putty session, which allows you to change the cipher selection order. Blowfish tends give better performance than the default AES.


0

After trying so many methods I searched on net related iptables, I got one best solution, now everything is working like a charm. And applied below command with root access using putty. 1)First I tried this commands: iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 2030 -j ACCEPT //press enter service iptables restart //press enter 2)then below commands: iptables -I ...


0

You have a couple of options here, you can specify commands that can be executed in the authorized_keys file (if you are using public/private keys) Here is an article which talks about this method: http://cybermashup.com/2013/05/14/restrict-ssh-logins-to-a-single-command/ The second way to skin this cat is to give the user account a restricted shell. In ...


0

Mar 19 10:41:51 myers proftpd[29675]: myhost.com - unable to create namebind for 'www.mydomain.com' to IPAddress#21: No such file or directory It's just a cosmetic warning. As I understood you are using proftpd-1.3.5. As part of the final work on 1.3.5, I started adding some of the foundation for supporting the HOST command (RFC 7151), which will ...


0

When I want to change the file modification time, I use an FTP client on the console. Log on with ftp ftp.example.com, then cd commands go to the correct directory SITE command to move the extended command mode UTIME somefile.txt 20050101123000 20050101123000 20050101123000 UTC Change the access time, modification time, it's time to create a directory ...



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