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The port forwarding approach is exactly what I take. However, a downside is that some networks (like when in hotels) implement egress filtering and only let you connect to known ports. So the servers on unusual ports will be inaccessible. There may be security/trust ramifications, but you could network share the files from all the machines to a central ...


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If an SFTP client does not specify permissions for uploaded files, the OpenSSH SFTP server assigns newly created files permissions 0664. That's for default umask 0002, which you can change using -u switch as an answer by @JimB shows. If an SFTP client specifies the permissions, OpenSSH server uses the specified permissions (umask does not apply). Overview ...


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The OpenSSH server does not support this. WinSCP SFTP client can do this from a client side, if that helps. See http://winscp.net/eng/docs/resume#automatic By default is uses the .filepart suffix for files over 100 KB only, but you can configure it to use it for any file. See http://winscp.net/eng/docs/ui_pref_resume (I'm the author of WinSCP)


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AFAIK OpenSSH doesn't have a support for that. <opinion>The probable reason behind that, that the OpenSSH guys favorize the minimal feature, maximal security concept which is quite visible on their other projects, too.</opinion> But it is not unconditionally a problem. You can do this by watching the system log, and setting up condition for ...


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From the server log record ("Did not receive identification string from..."), I assume you are connecting to an SSH/SFTP port (22) using an FTP protocol. Make sure the application B really supports SSH/SFTP and that you selected that protocol in its configuration (as opposite to entering port 22, but using FTP protocol). Make sure you did not confuse ...


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This is a known bug in FileZilla 3.10.0-beta3 through 3.10.0.1. https://forum.filezilla-project.org/viewtopic.php?t=34953 Either upgrade to 3.10.0.2 or later. Or use another SFTP client.


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According to the sshd_config man page, the internal-sftp is an in-process sftp server that requires no support files when used with ChrootDirectory. It was added much later than the sftp-server, but it is a default by now. It's suports everything that sftp-server does and has the above mentioned advantage. Another advantage is performance, as it's ...


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I'm sure that you have wrong permissions on ChrootDirectory This is quote from man sshd_config All components of the pathname must be root-owned directories that are not writable by any other user or group. Also check /var/log/auth.log on server, there you will see a error message.


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Internal-sftp require chrooted user home to reside inside root-owned dir: /some/path/root-owned/user-dir1 Root-owned dir should have 555 permissions and user-dirs should be created by root and owned by specific user. Inside subdirs user can do anything, but he can't delete or rename them. In your case the good approach is the next: ...


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Internal-sftp require chrooted user home to reside inside root-owned dir: /some/path/root-owned/user-dir1 /user-dir2 Root-owned dir should have 555 permissions and user-dirs should be created by root and owned by specific user. Inside subdirs user can do anything, but he can't delete or rename user-dir[12]. This is internal-sftp ...


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You cannot use condition in ChrootDirectory directive. But the Match directive allows conditions, that's what it is for. Put some users to one group, while other users to another group. And introduce a rule for each group with a different folder: Match Group sftp-users1 ChrootDirectory /upload1 Match Group sftp-users2 ChrootDirectory /upload2 ...



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